Recommended if You Like
Lyle Mays Michel Petrucciani Russell Ferrante

Genres You Will Love
Moods: Instrumental Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz Blues: Piano Blues Classical: Art songs

By Location
Hungary

Links
Band website

Janos Nagy

Janos Nagy

profession: pianist, composer, arranger

After graduating form The Franz Liszt Academy of Music with a degree in jazz piano, composing and arranging, he won first place at the Jazz Juniors contest in Cracow, received the “Best Soloist” award at the Getxo International Jazz Festival, and in 2003, as “Best Soloist of the Year,” he recieved an eMeRton award. In 2005 he was given an Artisjus award. Over the course of his carrier he played and recorded among others with Al diMeola, Alex Acuna, Arnie Somogyi, Ben Castle, Bernard Maseli, David Murray, Dave Samuels, Dewey Redman, Krzysztof Scieranski, Garry Willis, Paco Sery, Sangoma Everett, Tony Lakatos and Winston Clifford.

After participating in the competition in Vilnius, he gave a series of solo concerts in London and Prague. Not long after forming his own trio (Janos Nagy Trio), they played together with world-famous saxophonist David Murray at the Mediawave Festival in 2001. The concert was later voted “The Jazz Event of the Year” by the critics of Gramofon Magazine. In May 2002 the trio had Dewey Redman in its midst as a special guest. The trio has since then performed in various festivals abroad (Cracow, Macau, Vilnius and Warsaw).

In the spring of 2004 he a founded the ’Freestyle Chamber Orchestra’. The FSCO comprises both classical and jazz musicians, including some who prefer to ignore the strict boundaries between the two genres. By its name and musical nature, it is known as an orchestra which represents freedom. Its leader, Ferenc Erkel Prize-winner János Nagy, demonstrates his multi-faceted skills as a musician, playing piano and a variety of keyboard instruments, besides acting as composer and orchestrator. Regular collaborators with the FSCO, bagpipe player Balázs Istvánfi and hurdy-gurdy player Béla Szerényi contribute greatly to the ensemble’s unique sound by injecting the musical styles of the Carpathian Basin and the folk music of other, similarly spirited peoples.

In 2011 he formed the Monamo. MONAMO the Hungarian jazz band made its debut in Budapest Jazz Band in 2011. Since then they had already performed in the Palace of Arts in Budapest (MÜPA). The band combines the creative energies of singer-violinist Edina Mókus Szirtes, percussionist Kornél Mogyoró and János Nagy. They play own compositions, songs written for poems by contemporary Hungarian poets, and some of their favourite compositions. MONAMO comprises both classical and jazz musicians, including some who prefer to ignore the strict boundaries between the two genres. By its name and musical nature, it is known as an orchestra which represents freedom.

He played with other bands in the past: such as Fusio (1989-91), Fortinbrass Quintet (1992-94), Kőszegi Imre Kvartett/Kvintett (1992-94), Borbély Műhely (1998-2002), 9:30 (1996-2009), In Line (1996-2001),Class Jazz Band of Eszter Horgas (2002-2004). He play

He teaches in the Jonh Kodolanyi University of Applied Sciences and in the Tibor Pikethy Music Secondary School jazz piano.

In 2002, on a request from the Béla Kövér Puppet Theatre of Szeged, he composed a one-act opera, which premiered in November 2003.

In the same year, together with co-writer Miklós Malek he engaged in the adaptation of Bizet’s Carmen. Their collaboration gave birth to a new piece mingling elements of classical, contemporary and jazz music. The premiere of this featured special guest Al Di Meola. The piece was later preformed at the Arena of Pula in Croatia.


Awards:

1995 the second prize at the 14th Jazz-piano Improvisation Contest in Vilnius.
1996 Jazz Juniors Competition, Krakow - best group, best soloist
1997 Getxo International Jazz Festival – best soloist
1998 and 200 eMeRTon prize as the Best Group of the Year (prize of the National Hungarian Radio)
2005 Artisjus Musical Foundation's award
2011 Ferenc Erkel prize (prize of the Hungarian Culture Department)