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Genres You Will Love
Moods: Solo Female Artist Rock: Adult Alternative Pop/Rock Rock: Adult Contemporary Rock: American Trad Rock Rock: Classic Rock

By Location
United States - Michigan

Links
Laurie Horn's Facebook Music Page Laurie Horn PassAlong Tradebit PayPlay Apple iTunes Bitmunk

Laurie Horn

For Laurie Horn, her new album “Alive Again” represents two journeys. It is a mid-point between two lives – one long, silent journey has come to a close and another journey, a more liberating and creative one, has begun. When listening to “Alive Again” the sense of liberation and renewal radiates with years of built-up creative energy that Laurie has infused into every song on the album. Through these works, Laurie wishes to ignite something in the listener’s spirit so that they might also soar and feel alive again.

Laurie’s silent journey started, ironically, amidst the sound of an American musical renaissance. She began her musical career as a teenager during the turbulent ‘60s and ‘70s. A singer with amazing range and power, Laurie thrilled her audiences and felt energized with every performance.

Young, talented, touring the country with her band, singing, performing, partying with some of the greatest names in Rock ‘n Roll…Laurie was on an adventure that most people only dream of, and during a time that laid the groundwork for modern American music.

It should be no surprise, of course, that there is a turn of events. This is where the night of youthful recklessness comes along, the one that has broken so many potential artists throughout the centuries. But in Laurie’s case it wasn’t an overdose or a night of passion that lead to motherhood. Energetic and enthusiastic, Laurie pushed beyond her limits one night. With a bad case of laryngitis, she decided to go on with a show. It was a Janis Joplin impersonation that did her in -- that night she severely damaged her vocal chords and that was, for a while, the end. For a year she could only whisper. Her musical instrument damaged, the doctors believed she would never sing again.

Twenty invisible years passed.

It was a day in the late ‘90s, far from the turmoil of the ‘60s, that reopened the doors for her. Laurie ran into one of her old band mates from decades before. It was as though a script had been written for her life and some force had dropped a dues ex machina, a lifeline, right in her lap. Her friend invited her to a party where he had secretly arranged for studio time with her and another old band member. Their mission: to reawaken Laurie’s belief in her potential and bring her back to doing what she did best.

That was it. All she needed was a little spark, a tiny push, and she was hooked. That night marked the beginning of a new journey.

On paper these transitions look so easy. Just add a little inspiration and the montage of writing music and singing into a microphone begins, ending in bright lights and loud cheers. What they leave out, of course, is the years of doubt, the work, the false starts. For three years, Laurie tried forming bands only to watch them fall apart or fronting bands with no ambition, vision or higher aspirations.

Frustrated, she determined that now was the time to do her own music – a solo project. She began writing again. For Laurie, writing is a cathartic experience as she experiments with thoughts and ideas around her, turning them around and examining them from different angles. Writing these songs for her was a test and a testimony as she took the watershed of creativity she had built-up over the years and poured it onto paper.

With a few songs under her belt, she began the search for a studio and producer, another frustrating process which ended happily when she met Nick Dalbis. Skilled with multiple instruments and recording Nick proved to be a perfect match for Laurie’s musical style. Thus began an incredible collaboration between the two.

It was through this partnership that “Alive Again” finally emerged three-and-a-half years later.

“Alive Again” is a collection of passionate and deeply felt songs framed in the theme of renewal and the struggle we face as we work toward something better. The warmth of new life Laurie felt with the creation of each track translates to the listener with deep clarity. From the pop of "Never Mind", the country flavored "Falling" to the moody, emotionally charged "Little Girl Lost," you'll hear subtle influences from several decades.

Laurie draws from an eclectic group of inspiration: Led Zeppelin, Sarah McLachlan, Sheryl Crow, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, The Beatles, the Mamas & Papas, Pat Benatar, Fleetwood Mac, Bonnie Raitt and Chrissie Hynde, to name a few. For each song she chooses her influences carefully, hoping to touch her audience on many levels; intellectual, emotional or spiritual, with a desire to inspire people to look inside themselves and learn to forgive.