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Jazz: Bossa Nova Moods: Instrumental Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz

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Tsuyoshi Yamamoto and Marco Bosco

In 1980, as bandleader of Grupo Acaru, Marco Bosco recorded, during stay in Tokyo, the album "Live at Hot-Crocket" (RCA Victor), album that has been also distributed in Europe. Back in Brazil in 1981, Marco Bosco had effective participation in the beginning of the Brazilian independent phonographic production, occasion in which he independently produced, recorded and distributed "Aqualouco" (Café/FIF), the second album of the Grupo Acaru. In 1983, Marco Bosco recorded his first solo album "Metalmadeira" (Arco Íris/Odeon) with the participation of Belchior, Luli & Lucina, Ruriá Duprat, Nico Resende and Nico Assumpção. In 1986, recorded "Fragmentos da Casa" (Carmo/Odeon), his second solo album with the participation of Egberto Gismonti, Oswaldinho do Acordeom and Paulo Calasans amongst others. In 1990, Marco Bosco moved to Japan to study with Edo Sukeroku Taiko, a traditional Japanese drum group. In 1991 Marco Bosco launched his third solo album "Hánêréa - Power of Nature" (JVC/Japan), based upon the Guaraná legend of the Amazon Tribe Sateré-Maué, with the participation of Cesar Camargo Mariano, Sebastião Tapajós, Pique Riverte, Walmir Gil, Ruriá Duprat and Paulo Calasans. In 1993, Marco Bosco has released "Tokyo Diary" (New Frontier), his fourth solo album recorded in Tokyo, Los Angeles and São Paulo, with the participation of Oscar Castro Neves, Don Grusin, Alex Acuña, Jane Duboc, Flora Purin, Airto Moreira, Jimmy Johnson, Ricardo Silveira, Gary Meek, Paulo Calasans, O Edo Sukeroku Taiko and others, Record that has also integrated the Pioneer 3D Museum LD ROM. In 1994 Marco Bosco released his first single in Japan, "Soccer Alegria" (Toshiba/EMI) and in 1995 he had his first experience as actor with the Sino-American director Ping Chong and his company, in the Documentary Theater "Gaigin - Undesirable Elements, in Tokyo, commemorating 50 years of the end of the Second World War. In 1998 Marco Bosco recorded “There Will Be No Money Today” (Ape’s/Sony-Japan), his fifth solo album with the participation of Tsuyoshi Yamamoto, Casey Rankin, Paulo Calasans, Cisão Machado, Marcelo Mariano and Eiki Nonaka.
In May 2000, Marco Bosco returned to Brazil for the Nina Simone’s tour and decided to stay at home and start, together with Maestro Ruriá Duprat, the Rainbow Records, his own record label, as well as record the album “Techno Roots”, released in late 2001; a techno version of the songs of the great master Jackson do Pandeiro, with the participation of Egberto Gismonti, Dominguinhos, Marlui Miranda, Jean Garfunkel, Genival Lacerda, Vicente Barreto, Fuba de Taperoá and Miltinho Edilberto amongst others. In 2004 Marco Bosco returned to Japan to record the album "Live at the Brazilian Embassy", this time directed to Jazz Standards and Bossa Nova; recorded live in the Auditorium of the Brazilian Embassy in Tokyo with the participation of the international Japanese jazz pianist Tsuyoshi Yamamoto and the American singer D’Nessa, album released in June 2005 in Japan and worldwide over the internet. In Brazil, either in records or live performances, Marco Bosco worked with Egberto Gismonti, Maestro Rogério Duprat, Raul de Souza, Sebastião Tapajós, Nelson Ayres, André Geraissati, RPM, Wanderléia, Raul Seixas, Toquinho, Luiz Ayrão, Neguinho da Beija Flor, Nilson Chaves, Jean & Paulo Garfunkel, Simone, Lucinha Lins, Baby do Brasil, Belchior, Adoniran Barbosa, Zé Geraldo, Ronaldo Bastos, Renato Teixeira, Pena Branca & Chavantinho, Chitãozinho & Xororó, Zezé di Camargo, Sá & Guarabyra, César Camargo Mariano, Zé Rodrix, Ivan Lins, Rita Lee, Caetano Veloso, Elza Soares, Zélia Duncan, Sandra de Sá, Maestro Moacir Santos and others. In 1990 Marco Bosco moved to Japan, mainly to study with “O Edo Sukeroku Taiko”, a traditional Japanese drum group. Since his departure from Brazil Marco Bosco worked in Europe, Asia and North America with artists such as: Tsuyoshi Yamamoto, Zainal Abdin, Hank Jones, Sérgio Mendes, Ana Caran, Tânia Maria, The Boom, Melodie Sexton, Paul Jackson, Sadao Watanabe, Cesar Camargo Mariano, Leila Pinheiro, Eiki Nonaka, Sandii, Coba, Anri, Sepultura, Roberto Menescal, Airto Moreira, Flora Purin, Nina Simone, Gary Bartz, Dr. John, Simon Lebon (Duran Duran) Nick Wood, Leon Lay, U.F. O, Nina Simone, Randy Brecker, Zwey, Ronnie Cuber, Toninho Horta and his own group "Sururu Gang", besides of several works for the National Television Radio of Japan (NHK) in domestic broadcasts and BS Hi-Vision satellite for Asia and Europe. In February 2009 Marco Bosco received the American Grammy in the category of Best Contemporary Jazz for the Randy Brecker Album in Brazil and Leila Pinheiro’s album “Raiz” was nominated for the Latin Grammy in the category Best MPB Album in 2012.
Now, in 2013, Marco Bosco release the “33”, a compilation to commemorate 33 years recording career.


Marco Bosco
Past Press Reviews


Tsuyoshi Yamamoto & Marco Bosco Live at Brazilian Embassy in Tokyo, this album is something more than a reunion of two friends; is something more than the joint presentation of two wonderful musicians; is something more than the fusion of two different cultures and finally, is something more than the fusion of two musical styles. This album is the subliming of everything of these points.
Jazznin Magazine - Tokyo - June 2005

The live recording of the album of Marco Bosco and Tsuyoshi Yamamoto, in the hall at the basement of the Embassy of Brazil, started with a percussion solo with birds sounds and the whisper of leaves inside the nature. The introspective tone of the piano that then heard was emotive. The affectionate, generous and happy performance of both is full of smiles.
Jazz Life Magazine - Tokyo - July 2005

Joint presentation of Tsuyoshi Yamamoto and the Brazilian percussionist Marco Bosco - the session was opened in sounds of the nature created by Bosco. Beyond the quality of music, the fact of being an event for live recording in the Embassy of Brazil was surprising.
Swing Journal - Tokyo - July 2005

The result is infectiously danceable, eminently listenable, and cohesive in concept and sound, Jackson would have approved.
Techno Roots CD Review - Daniella Thompson on Brazil (http://daniv.blogspot.com/2002_05_01_daniv_archive.html#76134172) -
USA, May 2002

The first release package of Rainbow Records, bring to us "pearls" of Brazilian virtuosos, starting with "Techno Roots by Marco Bosco”.
Isto É Magazine – Brazil - October 2001

In all the tracks of Techno Roots album, Marco Bosco shows many instruments and good ideas using great samples and the perfect collocation of percussion elements inside of sometime complex harmonic and melodic structures. A great album.
Drums Magazine – Brazil – October, 2001

Techno Roots proves that the mix of new and old, result as eternal. One of the most creative albums of the last times
CD review at www.almanaquemusical.com.br - Brazil - August 2001

With his roots in the feisty rhythms and supple melodies of his native country, he carefully integrates elements of jazz, funk and other styles into his musical vocabulary.
Tokyo Classified CD Review – Japan - March 1999

This album, “There Will Be No Money Today”, has a fantastic mood and new wave of sound based on Brazilian roots. The album no wonders appeals to fusion fans that like Pat Metheny, Jim Beard and Bill Evans.
Cyber Fusion CD Review (http://www.jazzfusion.com) - Japan, October, 1997

Marco keeps creating his own music perceiving the spirit of nature. “There Will Be No Money Today” makes us feel his sensitivity. This album is full of comfortable sounds created by blending Japan and Brazil.
Rhythm & Drums Magazine - Japan - February1997

Marco, (concerning to Tokyo Diary album) is not only a rhythm player but also a space creator, like Airto and Naná. We can feel his inner sensitivity and strong musical conviction.
Latina Magazine - Japan - November 1993

Marco introduces the music of Amazon Indians so effectively. It is also fresh as environmental music.
Adlib Magazine - Japan - September 1991

"Hánêréa, Power of Nature" is, so to speak, "a sound of soul" that can shift his audience to the imaginary place he created without a word.
Jazz Life Magazine - Japan - September 1991

Marco has painted a world of vital Amazon with his various percussive skills. This CD "Hánêréa, Power of Nature" is bringing out a lot of visual images.
Latina Magazine - Japan - September 1991

In "Hánêréa, Power of Nature," Marco Bosco develops a vast situation before us, which is very imaginative and percussive skill, whilst showing us a taste of free jazz or modern music.
Swing Journal - Japan - September 1991

As matter of fact, (concerning Marco Bosco's concert) there are great moments to show a good dose of virtuosity.
O Estado de São Paulo - São Paulo Newspaper - Brazil - January 1987

"Fragmentos da Casa," percussionist Marco Bosco new album is something beyond the samba beat, and has great bright moments.
Mauricio Kubrusly - Globo Television - Brazil, October 1986

The performance of Marco Bosco in his new album places him amongst the most creative percussionists and showmen such as Naná Vasconcelos, Airto Moreira and Djalma Correa.
Jornal Zero Hora - Porto Alegre Newspaper - Brazil -July 1986

"Fragmentos da Casa" it is records that break taboo. It proves that, in regarding to percussion in the Brazilian pop music, there is someone else besides Naná Vasconcelos, Paulinho da Costa and Djalma Correa.
O Estado de São Paulo - São Paulo Newspaper - Brazil - July 1986

Marco Bosco already has an outstanding musical background, which place him amongst names of Brazilian music.
Folha de Londrina - Londrina Newspaper – Brazil - July 1985

The Album "Metalmadeira" of Marco Bosco is, with no doubt, a very serious and creative work.
Diário de Pernambuco - Recife Newspaper - Brazil, July 1984

"Fragmentos da Casa," percussionist Marco Bosco new album is something beyond the samba beat, and has great bright moments.
Mauricio Kubrusly -- Globo Television – Brazil - October 1986

The performance of Marco Bosco in his new album places him amongst the most creative percussionists and showmen such as Naná Vasconcelos, Airto Moreira and Djalma Correa.
Jornal Zero Hora - Porto Alegre Newspaper - Brazil - July 1986

"Fragmentos da Casa" is a record that breaks taboo and proves that, with regard to percussion in the Brazilian pop music, there is someone else besides Naná Vasconcelos, Paulinho da Costa and Djalma Correa.
O Estado de São Paulo - São Paulo Newspaper - Brazil - July 1986

Marco Bosco already has an outstanding musical background, which place him amongst names of Brazilian music.
Folha de Londrina - Londrina Newspaper - Brazil -July 1985

The Album "Metalmadeira" of Marco Bosco is, with no doubt, a very serious and creative work.
Diário de Pernambuco - Recife Newspaper - Brazil - July 1984



Tsuyoshi Yamamoto

Tsuyoshi Yamamoto was born on 23rd March 1946. He started to play the piano when he was in primary school. In junior high school, he played the trumpet. His interest in jazz began when he first heard Art Blakey’s tunes in the French movie, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”. It inspired him to return to the piano, to perfect his technique. During his university years, he played for Mickey Curtis and the Samurais and began his professional career, including tours with the group in Europe. Following this, he joined other bands and played in clubs. In l973, he formed his own band. As he polished his piano skills, he came to idolize pianists such as Bobby Timmons, Wynton Kelly and Red Garland. Yamamoto’s melodic technique and phrasing reflect Kelly’s influence. His use of block chords in ballads is similar to Garland’s. He had also heard Monk’s solo. When this record was made, his chief interest was pianists such as Randy Weston. Isoo Fukui was born on 10 April 1947 and came to Tokyo in 1968. He has played in a number of groups and in 1972 joined the MASARU IMADA TRIO. Tetsujiro Obara was born on 23 March 1941. At the university he played in the brass band. In l965,he became a professional. He has played in a number of bands, in many clubs and formed his own band. His favourite drummer is Elvin Jones.

1. Misty - The title number is one of Enroll Garner’s famous creations. Most Garner’s compositions are cooly erotic and this one is no exception. The performance skillfully preserves the original mood.
2. Blues - By Tsuyoshi, this number shows his emotional affinity with the blues. It has a relaxed atmosphere.
3. Yesterdays - By Jerome Kern for the musical “Roberta”, this is a famous jazz standard. Isoo’s bass begins the theme.
4. Honoy Suckle Rose - By Fats Waller, it is the theme song for the musical “Load to Coal”. In this pleasing interpretation Tsuyoshi begins with a light piano phrase.
5. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes - As “Yesterdays”, this was in “Roberta”. Tsuyoshi’s piano changes expression in a striding and individual manner.
6. I Didn’t Know What Time It Was - This Richard Kodgers composition is a famous jazz standard - A fine performance.
7. Angel Eyes - One of Matt Dennis’ representative compositions, an appropriate close to the album. In his solo,Tsuyoshi extends the mood of this ballad.

This album won the “Best Engineering Award” of Jazz Disk Award, Swing Journal Magazine, Critic’s Poll 1974.