Bonedome | Thinktankubator

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Thinktankubator

by Bonedome

Drawing from disparate sources including ELO, AC/DC, Buddy Holly, The Dandy Warhols, Depeche Mode, Love & Rockets, Bob Mould, Thinktankubator assembles a collection of relationship songs clothed in quirky, sad, introspective, and self-deprecating timbres.
Genre: Rock: Retro-Rock
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1. Sandman
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2. Fade Away
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3. Girl One
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4. Slow Jesus Xing
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5. Eraser
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6. I Can Lose You
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7. Easy
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8. Red Flags R Trouble
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9. The Other One
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10. Steven
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11. Better
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12. Custody Lullabye
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Allan Hayslip (vocals, bass guitar, guitars, tracking engineer, composer, producer) established Bonedome as the nom-de-rock for songs and performances that have never quite fit in his other bands. Although he wrote, performed and recorded material for SPAM, Crackbox, Vibrolux, Sixty-Six, Prince Jellyfish and The Big Guns, and even took a few turns singing songs in some of those bands, Thinktankubator comprises material developed under the influence of but outside these projects and other projects like Tablet, Sushi Gabor, Floor 13, the Barry Kooda Combo, and the Darren Kozelsky band, and with Allan as the primary singer.

Gerald Iragorri (drums, percussion) was Allan's primary working partner for Thinktankubator from its inception. Gerald and Allan spent a month of weekends tracking and tweaking the basic rhythm track arrangements from demos. If there is a consistent basic sound for Bonedome, it's because of the work done by Gerald and Allan early in the process. A graduate of Dallas' prestigious Arts Magnet, Gerald has studied with some of the finest jazz mentors, and has been playing professionally (and multi-instrumentally) in successful Dallas bands for over 2 decades, among them Zane Gray, Whild Peach, Methatone, Leroy Shakespeare & The Ship of Vibes, Arthur Riddles Quartet, Yeah Yeah Yeah, Jounky Southern, and Prawn. Gerald & Allan started working together in the Rock Star Karaoke band, which, in addition to providing a little needed cash over the years, has provided a shared library of decades of material from which they have drawn in developing the Bonedome songs on Thinktankubator. Gerald and Allan also play together in the Barry Koooda Combo.

Edward McMahon (guitars) - Iowan Ed McMahon gravitated towards the music school and thriving jazz scene of Denton, Texas in the late 80's along with so many aspiring players. From there he found his way into a later iteration of Paul Slavens' Ten Hands (1993-1995). Not really cut out for the dayjob life, Ed has always been a "working musician," which translates to a wild and weird variety of pickup and session gigs over the years. In addition, Ed has played in Funktion Junktion, the Metal Shop band, Drive By Orchestra, as well as Reggie & Chad Rueffer's vastly underrated The HoChiMen, who shared a stage with Prince Jellyfish and gave Allan his first long, slightly uncomfortable look at Ed's amazing guitar playing. Ed would later replace Gregg Prickett in the Rock Star Karaoke band. Ed generously gave his time to put some of the guitar tracks on all but one of the songs on Thinktankubator, including signature passages in Fade Away and Red Flags R Trouble. Ed continues to do restaurant gigs with Tyla Taylor, session work, and is recording and performing with math-metal band The Better Death. There are unverified rumors that he was the King of Norway for 3 months in 1984, but he quit because he couldn’t tolerate a public healthcare option.

Paul Williams (guitars, keys, tracking engineer, mixing engineer) - Paul Williams is a native Houstonian whose first real band effort worked out pretty well; Paul played with singer/songwriter Steven Holt in Mercury Records' rock band Tablet in the 90's, where he honed an already strong natural melodic sense. Tablet and Vibrolux shared the same management, so when Tablet needed a soundman for one tour or a bass player for another, Allan was a natural pick. Paul & Allan would later play together with Jeff Halbert and Tommy Watts in Sushi Gabor, which Paul left to become an assistant, then chief engineer at Last Beat Studios. Paul developed a powerful engineering skillset and helped make numerous local favorite records, including those by Sorta, Vibrolux (after their return from LA) and The Sparrows. Paul even performed on guitar and keys with Vibrolux, which included Kim Pendleton, Paul Quigg and Trey & Clay Pendergrass. After Last Beat was closed by it's owner Caron Barrett. Paul struck out as a freelance hired gun engineer/producer. He still finds time to play with the Bryan Wakeland band as well as the Homespun Remedies, whose respective albums he also helped make. When tracking in 2007, Paul offered some of his signature melodic guitar figures on several songs, including Better and Slow Jesus Xing. During mixing at Tom Bridwell's Tomcast studio he added in a few tambourine and organ parts.

Colin Boyd (guitars, tracking engineer) - Singer, recording-artist, producer, Colin Boyd is a rare chameleon who shifts easily between the roles of frontman and sidmean. Colin is always received enthusiastically wherever he's found performing - and his songs... well, they've been recorded by a variety of musical artists. Jack Ingram, Kristin Garner, Monte Warden, Sara Hickman, Domestic Science Club, Big Twang - all are artists who've sung Boyd tunes. Colin and Allan became friends in the rock 'n' roll trenches of Rock Star Karaoke where Colin would frequently, fresh from his solo patio gig down the street, select and execute a perfect choice to restore some sanity to the evening. Colin pulled out his sweet vintage Tele for some choice parts on several songs, including The Other One and Red Flags R Trouble. Colin's several fantastic records can be found on the Happy Cat Records label, wherever you find the good stuff.

Jonathan Lacey (guitars, composer) - Jonathan's education in music started as a teenager, when he was welcomed into the Dallas music scene first as a photographer, then later as a guitarist in the 1984-era Barry Kooda Combo and the Cut Rate Toxins. Jonathan moved to New York City in the mid 80's, where he joined/formed the band that would become Warner/Giant recording artist The Beautiful. Jonthan returned to Dallas in the mid 90's, playing with early versions of Vibrolux. Later he and Allan became roomates, and were involved together in several projects inclulding Garland, F. Bean, and Prince Jellysfish. Several songs on Thinktankubator were written during, or at least inspired by this time. Jonathan and Allan developed "Steven" from the combination one of Jonathan's riffs and a set of lyrics Allan conceived during a bike ride home to Deep Ellum from The Gold Rush. Jonathan would later co-found (with Howard Kelley & Gregg Prickett) Rock Star Karaoke which Allan joined first as a soundman, then later as a bass player. Jonathan & Allan played together in the Punk Rock Dinosaurs (with Nervebreakers Barry Kooda & Mike Haskins, as well as Gerald) and currently also play together in the (2009) Barry Kooda Combo.

Gregg Prickett (guitars) - Gregg was nurtured in the mid-80's Dallas incubator that produced the Loco Gringos and The Buena Vistas. Gregg was the guitarist for The Buena Vistas for nearly a decade, beginning his never-ending accrual of guitar techinques and style. Never one to settle, Gregg was also simultaneously in 39 Powers and then Sixty-Six (with Allan, Bruce Alford, and Bill Longhorse). After the accidental demise of Sixty-Six, Gregg continued on with Bill Longhorse in the successful lounge act Mr. Pink, first on guitar, then bass, then Bass 6. Meanwhile Gregg joined Jonathan Lacey (The Beautiful), Mike Daane (Andy Timmons, Ugly Mustard), and Bryan Wakeland (Polyphonic Spree, Tripping Daisy) in the The Idiots, more homage than tribute to the Stooges. Gregg, Jonathan & Allan would join Earl Darling for rock band Prince Jellyfish. Meanwhile Gregg continued to cultivate his jazz chops while playing Shanghai Five. The culmination of this disciplined study was found in his compositions and leadership of neo-bebop jazz combo The Monks Of Saturnalia. In 2007 Gregg and his pack of wolves relocated to Chicago, where he has been doing pickup gigs and playing with Rabid Rabbit. Gregg recorded all the guitars on "I Can Lose You" on a return visit to Dallas in later 2007.

Chad Stockslager (keys) - Chad Stockslager made a name for himself in Budapest One the Denton/Dallas combo he shared with Keith Killoren. Chad came directly into Allan's sights when he made repeat performances at Rock Star Karaoke shows, where his verson of If I Had A Hammer would bring the house down. Chad can be seen regularly playing with The King Bucks, as well as with (Slobberbone successor band) The Drams and backing Danny Balis. Chad also teaches at Zounds Sounds. Chad's piano part on Custody Lullabye was so tasteful that several other backing tracks were dropped in favor of it. Chad also recorded a great organ part on an unreleased Yaz cover to be released later as part of a split single promotional package.

Stewart Bennett (tracking engineer) - Yes Stewart Bennett is an acclaimed FOH engineer for a very long list of high profile artists including John Mellencamp, Tom Petty, Van Morrison, Katie Perry, A Perfect Circle, Sum 41, John Fogerty, Seal, Beck, Christina Aguilera, Soundgarden and more. More importantly Stewart and Allan have been friends since high school, and, in addition to providing some much needed tracking help, Stewart is in a unique position to provide friendly, constructive consult and criticism using his exceptionally refined professional ears. There is no part of Thinktankubator that could've been completed without his input.

Tommy Moore (Album Artwork) - Tommy Moore Design Co is a spunky little graphic design studio located in downtown Chicago, IL. Tommy has 13+ years experience working on a variety of projects including music packaging, logo development, websites, print ads, billboards, signage, enhanced CD content and video editing. Prior to Chicago, Tommy was a lead designer for MGM Mirage. During his tenure at MGM Mirage, he executed design strategies for Cirque du Soleil’s Alegria, Lord of the Dance, Jay Leno, George Carlin, Paul Anka, Chicago, Rodney Dangerfield, Jeff Foxworthy, and the Beach Boys along with marketing collateral for various MGM Mirage properties. Tommy was recommended to Allan by Tami Thomsen, GM of Kirtland Records, because Tommy does most of the work for Kirtland and it's bands. Tommy does a lot of work for other old friends in Dallas, too. Tommy still hasn't explained to Allan what the album artwork "means," and Allan still hasn't asked.

Treehouse Recording - Treehouse was formed a decade ago by musician Allan Hayslip and engineer Stewart Bennett with the objective of providing digital multi-track recording gear, primarily for live/remote recording. Stewart and Allan have re-invested all profits (and some more cash, too) into augmenting and improving the rental stock. Treehouse provided all recording gear for Thinktankubator including the first set of Tascam DA-78's (until the all eventually broke), the Tascam MX-2424, the Midas Venice 320 as well as outboard effects gear used for montioring and rough mixes, and a wide variety of outboard mic preamps, dynamics processing and accessories.

Goat Hill Recording - By weekday, 3333 Harry Hines was a staid place, home of Eveready Services, where items were warehoused for Dallas' finest interior designers and their clients. By night and on weekends, Allan used it as a rehearsal and recording facility from 2003-2007. Jonathan Lacey, with Allan assisting, tracked and mixed the New Style American Boyfriends eponymous record here, and they tracked and mixed half of the Golden Falcons sole CD release here. The space was also used as a rehearsal space for Prince Jellyfish, the Rock Star Karaoke Band, the Punk Rock Dinosaurs, the Barry Kooda Combo, The Big Guns, and the Darren Kozelsky band. All basic tracking for Thinktankubator was done here, usually engineered by Allan Hayslip, but in some cases also by Stewart Bennett. Since the control room was not air-conditioned, Allan ended up engineering most of his own vocal tracks naked. The studio function ceased in 2007 after Eveready was notified that the building was slated for demolition and the lease would not be renewed. The building was almost immediately razed, but after 2 years nothing has yet been built.

Warehouse Recording - Eveready's new location 310 W. Mockingbird Lane, once the recording & rehearsing spaces were finally set up after several months of dormancy, provided the setting for the remaining guitar overdubs, Chad Stockslager's keys, and some more refined vocal recordings (with clothes on, because the control room is now air-conditioned). Colin Boyd, Stewart Bennett, and Paul Williams all pitched in to help complete the final vocal tracking. Stewart Bennett would also later mix a multi-track recording of The Sparrows, featuring the late Carter Albrecht, for use by the foundation set up in Carter's name.

Tomcast Recording - Tom Bridwell's studio, built into the back of his East Dallas home, has quickly established itself as one of the go-to places for high-value combinaton of equipment, instruments, and technology. Paul Williams completed the mixing of Thinktankubator at TomCast. The drums for "Girl One," originally tracked by Allan and Gerald using an experimental technique, were re-tracked by Gerald & Paul here using more conventional techniques.

Summer Break Records - is a small, independent Dallas label owned and operated by chronic music fans Robert Jenkins & Richard Winfield. The Summer Break Roster includes recordings by some of Dallas's best bands Sorta, The Sparrows, Salim Nourallah, Sarah Jaffe, Chris Holt, I Love Math, The Strange Boys, The Cutoff, Carter Albrecht, Here in Arms, Pleasant Grove, Rhett Miller, The Ranchero Brothers,& The Old 97's. Although Thinktankubator is the first record involving Bonedome or Allan, the shared history goes way back--Richard & Allan have known each other since middle school, when Allan's first band SPAM (which included Sorta's Trey Johnson on guitar) was Richard's training for music fandom. Robert and Allan share several mutual friends, since they attended the same high-school at the same time. The label's relationship to Thinktankubator is experimental--this is the first Summer Break release in which the artist (Allan Hayslip, via Bonedome) owns the copyright to the songs and the recordings, rather than the label owning the recordings. The objective of this new relationship structure is to maximize the use of the labels' infrastructure while staying well under the risk thresholds of all parties--hopefully, when and if opportunities arise for Bonedome and/or Thinktankubator, all parties will be able to approach each deal with great agility.
SONG CREDITS:
FADE AWAY
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Stewart Bennett
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

THE OTHER ONE
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Colin Boyd
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Organ: Paul Williams
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Stewart Bennett
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Additional Tracking at: TomCast
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

GIRL ONE
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Colin Boyd
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Baritone Guitar: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Additional Tracking at: TomCast
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

EASY
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Colin Boyd
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Colin Boyd
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

BETTER
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Guitars: Paul Williams
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Additional Tracking at: TomCast
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

STEVEN
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Jonathan Lacey
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Additional Tracking at: TomCast
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

ERASER
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Acoustic Guitars: Allan Hayslip
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

POSTNAUT
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Paul Williams
Acoustic Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

SANDMAN
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Guitars: Allan Hayslip
Baritone Guitars: Allan Hayslip
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

RED FLAGS R TROUBLE
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

SLOW JESUS XING:
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Guitars: Paul Williams
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

WRONG
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Guitars: Paul Williams
Guitars: Allan Hayslip
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

I CAN LOSE YOU:
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Gregg Prickett
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

CUSTODY LULLABY
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Percussion: Gerald Iragorri
Piano: Chad Stockslager
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering

ONLY YOU
Vocals: Allan Hayslip
Drums: Gerald Iragorri
Bass: Allan Hayslip
Guitars: Ed McMahon
Baritone Guitars: Ed McMahon
Organ: Chad Stockslager
Tracking: Allan Hayslip
Additional Tracking: Paul Williams
Tracked at: Goat Hill Recording
Additional Tracking at: 24 Porn Recording
Mixing: Paul Williams
Mixed at: TomCast
Mastering: Jim Wilson
Mastered at: Airshow Mastering


Reviews


to write a review

Daniel Elkin

Don’t Tell Allan Hayslip That You Love Him
Bonedone releases a bitch slap of an album with Thinktankubator

“You should be glad that words were the worst things
I ever put in your mouth”
-Better by Bonedome on Thinktankubator

Steeped in the dark reality of dysfunctional and co-dependent relationships – celebrating and reveling in the more painful aspects of love, the giving of oneself to another and the violence therein – Allan Hayslip, long time Dallas, Texas sideman in bands such as Vibrolux, Sixty-Six, Prince Jellyfish, and currently performing in Rock Star Karaoke, pushes himself to the fore with his band Bonedome and their newly released album, Thinktankubator, which Hayslip describes as a “collection of relationship songs clothed in quirky, sad, introspective, and self-deprecating timbers.”

The album opens with the song Sandman, a muddied rocker thick with overdubbed harmonies, Julian Cope overtures, and a sneer, in which Hayslip openly declares his inability to keep any sort of resolve in his decisions in the face of another’s desire. This abdication of power, according to many a paisley sweater wearing prescription writing psychiatrist today, leads to feelings of inferiority and, more to the point in this case, anger, resentment, and mistrust of others. It is in this pot that most of Thinktankubator stews.

Songs like Eraser, a slower-tempoed harmonic showpiece in which Hayslip really lets slip his chorister training; Easy, a heavy, crescendo pointing arm waver; and Better, a real multi-layered stand out rocker, all play with the idea of betrayal and the hurt it begets. There is an undertone of violence in these songs, most obviously in Easy, whose chorus of “It’s easy to kill a man / It’s easy from where I stand” is almost a distraction from the strangulation fantasy in which Hayslip revels in the aftermath of his lover’s seeming affair. Hayslip himself is an imposing figure, large by any standards, which only adds to the ominous nature of these songs.

Yet Hayslip also seems to indicate that he is just as capable of betrayal as anyone else. Girl One, a song I was singing to myself while folding laundry hours after listening to it; The Other One, an obvious nod to the Pixies (actually Hayslip and Black Francis look like they could have been separated at birth) that veers off on its own to become comfortable in its authentic groove; and Red Flags R Trouble, another of the album’s songs that stuck with me long after I last listened to it, all seem to inform the listener that Hayslip can give just as good as he can get in this cage match of heartbreak and betrayal.
The nakedness of these songs is almost brutal at times. This may be a result of the fact that Hayslip has lived through some real heartache in his life and has, through true introspection, been able to channel this destruction into an act of creation – or it may be a by-product of the fact that most of the basic tracking for the album was done in an non air conditioned control room in the heat of the Dallas summer, allowing Hayslip to engineer naked, a fact he seems to take great glee in revealing.

The song I Can Lose You takes the idea of abandonment further and moves it into an interesting discussion about the nature of friendship and the sacrifices of that relationship, with Hayslip playing the convenient martyr in this complex song heavily indebted to David Bowie’s Space Oddity and Ashes to Ashes.

While the album’s core rests in these themes of betrayal, abandonment, and violence, there are a couple of notable exceptions. The first is Steven, which has one of the most honest choruses (chori??) since Lou Reed openly declared that he wanted to be black. In Steven, Hayslip shouts “I write songs to give good interviews / I do drugs to give good interviews,” underlying his understanding that nothing sells today like a good back-story and an even heavier horse or monkey on your back.

The other exception is my favorite song on the album, Fade Away, a stumpy, thuddy collision between Buddy Holly and AC/DC. Here, Hayslip turns on its head the classic poet pick-up line: “Baby, if you let me lick on you awhile, I’ll write a poem about it and make you immortal.” Fade Away seems to celebrate the transience of existence and notoriety -- that he and his lover are “just two drops in the sea” who will eventually just fade from history. “And it’s okay,” according to Hayslip. While seemingly celebratory of this sort of carpe diem, the song’s ending refrain of “I’m gonna tell you” returns the listener to the ominous tone of the rest of the album, adding another layer of complexity to the message of the song.

While the album does misfire a couple of times, most notably on Slow Jesus Xing and the cringing choral drudgery of Custody Lullaby, the great majority of it is filled with tight, well-orchestrated songs that highlight Hayslip’s song writing ability and his Peter Murphy ispired vocals. The album bodes well for Hayslip’s continued emergence as a front man and it is certainly worth a listen, especially if you’re driving away from your lover’s home for the last time ever, gripping the steering wheel white-knuckled tight, all gacked up on anger and betrayal, and looking for something to say.
-Daniel Elkin

Allan Hayslip

Some other reviews from other sites that won't get posted unless I do it :)
======================================

From Andrew Boe at Three Imaginary Girls, Tuesday, April 27, 2010
(http://threeimaginarygirls.com/contentcdreview/2010apr/thinktankubator)
Bonedome  Thinktankubator
{7 of 10} - buy it!
Here is a curious new release. Judging from the artwork, the new CD by Bonedome resembles a 1990s industrial genre cover, something from one of those heavier acts such as Frontline Assembly. The music that spills forth from your speakers or headphones, however, is quite different from what was expected by the packaging, save for the fast and furious rock and roll songwriting which often sonically resembles characteristic recordings from that decade.Thinktankubator is an immediate rock album that is loud, but also concentrates on melody and is thus up-tempo enough to obscure the grunge sound of the guitar driven songs.

Most of the tracks are succinct numbers that dont waste time on build-ups or changes in dynamics. Steven begins with some distorted bass akin to something from Pixies Doolittle. The electric guitar playing is rather different though. It sounds more like mid-period Smashing Pumpkins. Eraser is an acoustic ballad that recalls The Bends era Radiohead in certain ways. Fade Away sounds like it would be the single as it comes across as a crossbreed between The Afghan Whigs and The Rolling Stones.

Bonedome has spent what sounds like a lot of time perfecting the sound inThinktankubator. The production is polished and clear without sounding overproduced and the songs are thick with crisp musical resonance and often multi-tracked vocals. If the marriage between 1990s influences and current recording technology is what they were going for, then this album has hit its target straight on.

================================================
April 29, 2010

BONEDOME Thinktankubator CD
Filed under: Album Reviews, Reviews  russelforster @ 1:11 pm
http://www.piratecatradio.com/wordpress/?p=20960

BONEDOME / Thinktankubator CD / Summer Break Records / 2010

The strain of 70s power-pop that got assimilated by 80s gothy New Wave, especially by bands on the other side of the big pond, is in full force on this quirky release. Allan Hayslip, the singer/songwriter/producer here, might have been born 30 years too late to cash in on the original dark pop craze, but better late than never. Like the Silverlake pop explosion of the 00s, I give a thumbs up to good sounds even if they arent all that original.

SOUNDS LIKE:
XTC, BAUHAUS, CURE

SUGGESTED TRACKS:
4 Slow Jesus Xing (shades of TEARDROP EXPLODES)
6 I Can Lose You (BYRDS meet BEATLES Tomorrow Never Knows)
9 The Other One (CARS meet GUIDED BY VOICES)

============================================
From BabySue.com, May 2010
http://www.babysue.com/2010-May-LMNOP-Reviews.html#anchor125927

Bonedome - Thinktankubator (CD, Rock)
Instantly impressive stuff. The folks in Bonedome are yet another band incorporating the ideas and sounds of the 1980s into their music. We can hear traces of a wide range of folks while spinning this disc...but specific artists that come to mind include David Bowie, The Psychedelic Furs, and Peter Murphy. The tracks on this album feature layers upon layers upon layers of overdubs and lots of instruments and effects. But fortunately the vocal melodies don't get lost in the process, as the songs themselves take center stage here. We have to admit that at times the super thick production is a bit much...but considering how strong the melodies are that seems like a teeny tiny thing to whine about. Twelve cool heady tracks including "Sandman," "Girl One," "Easy," and "Custody Lullabye." Top pick.

===============================================
Bonedome: Revives 90s alternative and grunge
Group from Texas recently released their first album Thinktankubator

Ann Simpson, Asst. Copy Editor, The University Times, May 4, 2010
Asimps27@uncc.edu
http://www.scribd.com/full/30900003?access_key=key-2bs6w02alqu7v0qdfru3

Texan alternative group Bonedome released Thinktankubator. The name is incredibly indicative of what the album becomes. It seems to be an out-of-the-ordinary musical experience intended to force a new perspective on its listeners.

The Dallas-based group was formed under the leadership of Allan Hayslip, who intended the group as the nom-de-rock for songs and performances that have never quite fit in his other bands according to the website.

Hayslip fills a lot of roles for the group, including vocals, bass guitar, guitars, tracking engineer, composer and producer. He is joined by Gerald Iragorri on drums and percussion, Edward McMahon on guitars, Paul Williams on guitars and keys, Colin Boyd on guitars, Jonathan Lacey on guitars and composition, Gregg Prickett on guitars and Chad Stockslager on keys for the album. Stewar Bennett served as the tracking manager.

The music is a strange combination between Frightened Rabbit, Green Day, and Dishwalla, with the same eccentric, esoteric, and cynical lyrics standard in 90s alternative rock. If you listen to the 90s lunch on 106.5 and want a fresh band for a similar sound, Bonedome is for you.

Slow Jesus Xing epitomizes this sound, with slow, drawn out riffs that, on the surface, mask a critique on American religious culture. The lyrics are akin to the style found in Porno for Pyros Pets and the Butthole Surfers Pepper. In Eraser, Hayslip croons to losing a woman hes abused.

Whether hes looking at an outside situation ironically or being brutally, apathetically honest about a situation of his own, he turns the normal breakup song on its head. This is a consistent pattern. Bonedome turns normal sounding alternative music into an interesting play on the expected; he turns normalcy into abnormality.

The most brillian of any of the songs on the album in this way is Custody Lullaby. Whats normally considered a way to comfort an unhappy child, a song that serves to remid the world is indeed a safe place, becomes an apology for a child stuck between an unfair situation that punishes the least responsible.

Not all of the songs impress, however. I Can Lose You is not only generic musically, but so are the lyrics. Nothing complex in the way of musical style or lyrics are offered to the listener, with simple lyrics like if losing me now makes you better some how, all right and the signals were used to arent very strong.

It seems like theyre making an analogy between a failing relationship and losing signals at NASA (Houston, we have a little problem), but David Bowie and Pink Floyd did that already. Its either that, or theyre referencing the city of Houston, making the song even more simple. With songs like Custody Lullaby and Slow Jesus Xing Im disappointed, because its clear theyre more clever than that.

Its obvious thats what the group was going for. The album is self-described as a product of a musical omnivore whose lyrical style is dark, indeed often chilling because of his massive grudge against the world, according to the website. All of that is evident in everything the band does.

If that was the point, theyve more than succeeded. The band also proclaimed to encourage on their website, promising that its an album that rewards each further listening, as layers of guitars reveal hidden melodies and a previous unnoticed line reveals itself to be a subtly clever bit of vindictiveness. On the second and third play of the album this is precisely what happened.

The albums better songs will make you [sic] thing, and youll skip past the less impressive ones on your playlist. Lets be honest though. What album doesnt have songs that displease someone somewhere, even if the listener actively likes the band? If you want a throwback to the shockingly blatancy of 90s grunge and alternative, check them out. You wont regret if if you do.

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From John Neudorf at Sea Of Tranquility, May 6, 2010
http://www.seaoftranquility.org/reviews.php?op=showcontent&id=9171

Bonedome: Thinktankubator

Bonedome is the brainchild of Texas musician Allan Hayslip and have recently released their first album Thinktankubator. Besides adding his considerable vocal talents, Hayslip plays guitars and bass and has help from a few other musicians including Gerald Iragorri on drums and percussion and Ed McMahon on guitars.

Having never heard of this band before I was pleasantly surprised after listening to Thinktankubator. The music sits directly under the alternative umbrella with occasional references to classic and progressive rock. This is a guitar based album but you will not find any solo extravaganzas here. Instead listen for edgy guitar textures with off kilter melodies and spacious rhythms. Oh sure there is the odd solo here and there but that is not what this band is about. Complimenting the guitar sound are the vocals of Hayslip. He has a deep rich baritone which is more than a little bit similar to David Bowie which is not a bad thing in my book. Other points of reference would be 80s-90s Iggy Pop, XTC, Nirvana and The Beatles, especially regarding the layered vocal harmonies which are a staple of this disc.

Some of my favourites include "I Can Loose You", featuring an edgy guitar rhythms and vocals that harkens back to XTC and the richly textured "Easy" with its sparse guitar arrangement and Hayslip's excellent vocals paying homage to Bowie's musical stylings. Other notables include the late 70s retro rock of "Steven" reminiscent of The Cars' debut and the album ending "Custody Lullabye" with its pretty guitar melody and excellent layered vocals that took me back to The Beatles circa 1969. Perhaps the proggiest song is "Red Flags R Trouble" demonstrating quirky guitar rhythms and more great vocals.

I should point out there are some weaker moments here like the somewhat pedestrian rock of "Better" but overall this is a strong alternative rock album with plenty of hooks and one that fans of the genre should check out.


Track Listing:
1. Sandman
2. Fade Away
3. Girl One
4. Slow Jesus Xing
5. Eraser
6. I Can Lose You
7. Easy
8. Red Flags R Trouble
9. The Other One
10. Steven
11. Better
12. Custody Lullabye

Added: May 6th 2010
Reviewer: Jon Neudorf
Score:
Related Link: Band's Official Site
Hits: 26
Language: english

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By Dino Roeker in the May 2010 issue of Pop Rocket Press
http://poprocketpress.com/
("Recent Issue" is a large .pdf)

BONEDOME, THINKTANKUBATOR, SUMMER BREAK RECORDS

Say it loud, say it proud, Im bald and I rock. Such is the veteran musicians credo needed to name your new project Bonedome. Head honcho Allan Hayslip has played through numerous bands from his home base in Dallas. You may suspect a scattershot approach with the first two songs ranging from Metallica (Sandman) to Buddy Holly (Fade Away.) Relax. These originals most closely resemble early Police and Elvis Costello, slowed down and injected with a little Texan vitriol for color. Mash-up think tank and either masturbator or incubator depending on the quality of the resulting revelations and you get Thinktankubator. Bonedome happily delivers both, with a wink and a snarl.

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By Andres Solar, Swampland Record Statesman
May 11, 2010 - Volume 2, No. 5
http://www.swamprecord.com/

Bonedome
(Dallas, Texas, USA)
Thinktankubator (12-song album)
 (9 out of 10)

Its 2010 and the grunge Beatles have arrived. This in the form of Allan Hayslips quartet and their inviting confluence of 60's song-sense and 90's sound-styling. Not afraid of melodies-- or harmonies for that matter, as a large part of the lyrics is delivered by two or more voices, Bonedome maintains an astounding balance of driving energy, choice musical accents, and patient catchiness. Unapologetic and confident, due perhaps in part to Hayslips decades of musicianship, from boys choir, to symphony orchestra, to Texas rock band. -- A.S.

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Chris Dahlberg, Cosmo Gaming
April 20, 2010
http://www.cosmosgaming.com/articles.php?id=2631&articletype=review

Music: Bonedome: Thinktankubator
Our Take
Bonedome is one of those bands whose music contains a little bit of everything rock related. On their debut effort, the group has elements of classic rock, progressive rock, and alternative rock (among others) all mixed into one cohesive sound. While this may sound as though it is going to result in a very disjointed effort, the bands debut effort Thinktankubator is actually a very layered effort that will have listeners analyzing every single song just to find out what influences it pulls from. And although there are some slightly weaker tracks, the overall album is very strong and should keep people interested.

Despite the fact that almost every song on Thinktankubator has a slightly different sound from the last all of the tracks fit in with one another and nothing is ever thrown at the listener that seems unnatural or out of place.
Bonedome clearly is interested in always offering something new, as one minute they might be playing old school progressive rock while the next they are playing more modern alternative rock. Theres certainly a lot to like, as the instrumentalists put a lot of emphasis on creating catchy melodic riffs that make all of their different styles to stick with listeners.
Admittedly there is a song or two where the sounds just kind of fade into the background and dont grab your attention, but as a whole this album does stand out.

Vocalist Allan Hayslip sounds as though he was ripped out of the halls of classic rock as his singing is very reminiscent of a number of rock vocalists from the late 60s and early 70s. Hayslip is backed up by some of the other musicians and this is often used to create some very cool harmonies. What is even more impressive is how he is able to adapt his style to fit all of the different instrumental arrangements without sounding awkward. Despite the fact that his voice gives Bonedome a slight retro vibe, this doesnt make the group sound dated at all and actually helps them out.

Thinktankubator is a very interesting release that manages to mix retro and modern rock together to create material that should attract listeners both young and old. There is still some room for the band to grow and continue to expand on all of their various instrumental styles but as of right now theyre still memorable. Look for Bonedome to be in a lot more places in the next few years as they have lots of potential.

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A negative review [we can take it] from TOM CRITES, PANISCUS REVUE
http://home.earthlink.net/~newpanaudio/

BONEDOME  Thinktankubator
Extremely boring and unimpressive rock music thats so generic I cant even label it. There are a few small moments here, but for the most partThinktankubator actually manages to get worse and worse with each progressive song. This from a group of guys who sound like they just wanted to form a band for the sake of being in a band more than actually having some sort of musical vision or imagination: small club stuff created to pick up little girls who dont know any better. The ones that didnt walk out on the arm of a more eligible gent before the set was over, that is.

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By DC Larson at Damnation Dance Party
Friday, April 23, 2010
http://damnationdanceparty.blogspot.com/2010/04/bonedome-thinktakubator-summer-break.html

Bonedome "Thinktakubator" (Summer Break)
Charged and deliriously ebullient lead-on "sandman" bursts in fully technicolor and cleverly collated spectacle. It rockets stratosphere-ward, only to shower/bombard reeling listeners with neon tonal sparks. Shards of felt hues jut from surrounding sod. Moods, paces, and inclinations whirl past like scattershot kaleidoscopic emissaries from plateaus uncharted yet universal. Progression with steely ambition, gold pot.

Recommended "Sandman, " "Steven"

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From Monsieur Delire, April 23, 2010
http://blog.monsieurdelire.com/search/label/Bonedome

La voix du chanteur Allan Hayslip rappelle beaucoup celle de Peter Murphy. Cest la premi?re chose que vous remarquerez ? l?coute de Bonedome. Ce nest pas une mauvaise chose, loin de l?, mais cest notable. Pour le reste, Thinktankubator propose une bonne brochette de chansons inspir?e par le rock alternatif intelligent des ann?es 80 (Murphy ?poque Holy Smoke, XTC, Love and Rockets), vu ? travers le prisme du indie rock daujourdhui. On me la pr?sent? comme de lindie prog, ce que je rejette: les chansons sont courtes, simples, sans d?veloppements instrumentaux. Cela dit, elle sont intelligemment arrang?es, bien m?ries, et elles ont de lambition. Les fans de Murphy y trouveront quelque chose, jen suis s?r. Girl One est particuli?rement r?ussie.

The voice of singer Allan Hayslip is strongly reminiscent of Peter Murphy. Its the first thing youll notice when listening to Bonedome. Its not a bad thing, of course, but it leaps at you. That aside, Thinktankubator offers a good selection of songs inspired by the intelligent alternative rock of the 80s (Holy Smoke-era Peter Murphy, XTC, Love and Rockets), seen through the prism of todays indie rock. The album was introduced to me as indie-prog but thats just wrong: the songs are short, simple, without instrumental developments. That said, they are intelligently arranged, matured, and they show ambition. Fans of Murphy will find something to like in here, as did I. Girl One is a particularly good song.

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KEN SHIMAMOTO, from his top 10 albums list at the I-94 blog (http://i94bar.com/wordpress/2009/11/11/ken-shimamoto-2/):

"4. Bonedome  Thinktankubator. Journeyman Dallas alt-rock muso Allan Hayslip (Vibrolux, Prince Jellyfish, Rock Star Karaoke) steps up to the plate for his first outing as frontman and sole writer and knocks one out of the park, evoking (to these feedback-scorched ears) the spirit of Big Ds best-ever contribution to brainy pop-rock, obscuro genius Reggie Rueffers bands Spot and the Hochimen. Melodic yet aggressive, with the smartest lyrics Ive heard in a long time  maybe since the Hochimens Tierra del Gato a few years back, in fact."

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From RHETT MILLER of the Old 97's:

"Bonedome's Thinktankubator reminds me of some of my favorite records without ever seeming derivative. Of course it rocks. And of course Allan Hayslip's strong baritone does a great job of selling the songs. The real surprise is the quality of the songs - the deft melodies and smart lyrics. Thinktankubator is an outstanding accomplishment."

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from Nick Leggat, educator & free-lance writer

Bonedome is the nom de rock for what is essentially a one man band, the brainchild of Allan Hayslip, bassist, guitarist, vocalist, songwriter, engineer and producer. As happens frequently with other projects driven by one artists vision, Bonedomes Thinktankubator is for all intents and purposes unclassifiable. Certainly, its not chamber music or hip-hop, but what is it? The critic mind boggles at the prospect of labeling. As the portmanteau album title suggests, this music is a mash-up of several things. Is it layered, indie prog-rock? Music David Bowie might have written if hed been a Texan with anger issues? Love & Rockets covering the most vicious songs Elvis Costello ever wrote? Bob Mould leading a more restrained and catchier ELO?

&Well. It doesnt matter. Comparisons are useful only so far as they help recall various associations, and theres no end of sonic association on this wall of sound. Fade Away, the second track, twists the Buddy Holly classic around, into a pessimistic snarl: Im gonna tell you how it cannot be / How you and I wont make history. Hayslip, whose rich, self-assured vocals really do evoke shades of Bowie at times, writes his own Space Oddity in I Can Lose You. Resignation in the face of a doomed relationship wrapped in an allegory of a lost astronaut, with wicked wordplay at work: If radio silence sounds like sweet violence / Or a one-word sentence to a singular penance, all right. Its very dark, very tough stuff for those for whom such a description rings all too true.

Hayslip shuffles in similarly random references throughout the album: Echo and the Bunnymen, Herve Villechaize, Neil Sedaka, Elvis, and more. Thinktankubator is the product of a musical omnivore, a multi-instrumentalist with a symphonic approach, and a lyricist whose playful way with words (one finger follows the next / Just like pretext follows sex) seems constantly at war with his massive grudge against the world. Dark, indeed often chilling, its an album that rewards each further listening, as layers of guitars reveal hidden melodies and a previously unnoticed line reveals itself to be a subtly clever bit of vindictiveness.

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Aaron Comess (http://www.aaroncomess.com/) of the Spin Doctors had nice things to say:

"Allan Hayslip really kicks it up a notch on his latest band effort Bonedome. Tightly produced rock songs with the powerhouse rhythm section of Gerald Iragorri and Hayslip himself keeps this record pumping hard throughout with great rock grooves and solid songwriting. From the Beatles-influenced jams of I CAN LOSE YOU to the 80s influenced pop rock styles of STEVEN these guys outdid themselves this time with a very strong record worthy of attention."

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Chris Mueller, from the 12/13/09 Ghost Of Blind Lemon recommended playlist:

8. "Sandman", Bonedome
About a month ago, I met Allan Hayslip at Double-Wide. We
chatted for awhile, and then he gave me a copy of his
band's CD, Thinktankubator. I asked him to describe the
sound of this project, and he told me he had heard several
different comparisons, and he wasn't sure which ones were
accurate. He mentioned comparison to Bowie, and the
comparison seems fair for his vocals, but not so much in the
melodies. I can't pinpoint the exact influences, but I will say
that it strikes me as sounding like early 90's, pre Nirvana
alternative. George Gimarc would've put this band on a
Tales From the Edge CD in a heartbeat.

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a note from friend Lisa Loeb:

Your cd is really cool! I was surprised that it had so much cool Bowie-style sound and really liked the variety of songs on it. Very moody, rock, interesting, complicated, but like reading a book. The album cover and name of the "band" made me think it was going to be different than it was. Cool!!! Good job dude.

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from JM Matt Barker, co-founder of HTS Recordings:

Allan Hayslip's Bonedome jump on the front bumper and bend it damn near to the street on 'Thinktankubator.' With a hat tip to the young Bowie and a full-body check on the Davies brothers, this lad tells a layered story of loss and loco. The slightly off-center arrangements, on-target guitars, and well-built vocals keep it spinning. (And the production? Paulie [Lovatt] would be most pleased.)

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from Jeffrey Liles, performing artist (DDT, Cottonmouth, TX) and Dallas impresario:

I listened to your CD yesterday. Very well produced. Kinda reminded me of a cross between Interpol and 90's-era Iggy Pop. Well done...

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from Philip Naude, producer of 24-hour plays:

This is a really strong piece of work Mr. Hayslip. Your production is ideal for the material, warm but with a definite density and hard edge. I can imagine hours and hours of finesse, often by your lonesome in front of a glowing monitor well into the early hours of morning. I've had a chance to listen to it twice, whilst welding and tearing paper in a Tasmanian state, so I have yet to look deeply into your lyrical content, searching for meaning or neurosis, but it really rocks from the first down beat. I like the off kilter rhythm guitar work, that (at times) gets textural without becoming too emo. Lastly, which should actually be first is your vocals. You have a great rock voice and the multitracking and harmonies are well suited for it, all very natural in a world where I hear singers straining to become larger than life, or more rock-n-roll that they really are.

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from Jim Wilson, musician and mastering engineer:

It doesn't sound anything like Air Supply to me.

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from John Flores, playwright, sound-designer, director:

Hey Sly Dog, just listened to it:) And I must say, Girl One, Slow Jesus Xing (current Fav!) and Eraser back to back make for one hell of a sonic triptych. Custody Lullabye is heartachingly bittersweet. I also really like the other one, you know, The Other One? Big Shouts to You Sir

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from Toby Sheets, musician, GC hunter-killer

"Allan has a very David Bowie quality to his voice when it's a single track and I love the rich harmonies everywhere else. Gerald did a great job on the drums, the production is great. I can tell it was a labor of love and Bonedome should be proud of it."

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Allan Hayslip

Duh, of course I think my own album is great.
Of course I think it's great, I put a lot of time and effort into making it. And of course that also means there are things I hate about and would do differenty if I started over. But I'm pretty proud of the work we (me, Gerald Iragorri, Ed McMahon, Paul Williams, Colin Boyd, Chad Stockslager, Gregg Prickett, Jonathan Lacey) did, and I want you to buy it and check it out, because I'd really like to make another record.

If you've already purchased it or acquired it through other means, please let me know what you think. I'd really love the feedback and, more importantly, I'd like others to know a little bit about what you think it sounds like.

Love, Allan