Lois Laplace | Fine Sediment

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Avant Garde: Computer Music Electronic: Ambient Moods: Mood: Intellectual
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Fine Sediment

by Lois Laplace

As that title implies, it’s about detail and scale as well as it being a worthy example of process made visible.
Genre: Avant Garde: Computer Music
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Awake
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2:40 $0.99
2. Light and Shape
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6:25 $0.99
3. Forward Cathedral
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5:18 $0.99
4. Elevator Light
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5:29 $0.99
5. Erable
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9:06 $0.99
6. Chene
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4:53 $0.99
7. Murmur Partita
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7:20 $0.99
8. Souvenir
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7:40 $0.99
9. Bell Suite
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3:51 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The short two-word title for Loïs Laplace’s c74 release neatly encapsulates both its elegant and restrained content and the method of its construction. As that title implies, it’s about detail and scale as well as it being a worthy example of process made visible.

Fine Sediment’s collection of nine self-contained vignettes are both simple in their sources (as investigations of simple MSP processing) and complex in their execution in a way that rewards frequent or careful listening. In many cases, the audio objects seem “found” as much as created, with their evocative title phrases or humbler names—oak (érable) and maple (chêne)—suggesting a Renaissance “cabinet of curiosities” more than a Max programmer’s trail of breadcrumbs as he enters the forest of possibility.

The word “sediment,” derives from the Latin verb “to settle.” Listen quietly and carefully, and see what
settles for you. Then, listen again.


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