Tarik & Julia Banzi, Al Andalus Ensemble | Alchemy

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Alchemy

by Tarik & Julia Banzi, Al Andalus Ensemble

Casidas, noubas, cantigas as breathing art forms. 'Alchemy' is the sound of the past and of the future. Advancing in the footsteps of the oldest, continuous tradition of art music, the extraordinary Andalusian heritage. Perfect listening for the Alchemist
Genre: World: Andalusian
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1. Casida de La Muchacha Dorada (Caside of The Golden Girl) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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6:05 $0.99
2. Al-Boustan (The Garden) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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3. Cantiga de Santa Maria #100 Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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4. Housnak Ishtahar fe Garnata (A Beauty Famed in Granada) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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5. Jinete (Rider's Song) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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6. Tushiya Al-Istihilal (Nouba) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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3:42 $0.99
7. Durme Donzella (Sleep Beautiful Child) Ladino Lullaby Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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5:57 $0.99
8. Alchemy Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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9. Aklie Abbah (She took my Mind) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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10. Conversation (Improvisation Andalusi') Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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7:26 $0.99
11. Granadina (Live) Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Available at iTunes as a digital download!

INTRODUCTION (Ted Gioia)

ALCHEMY: The most powerful forces in the world today come from the accelerating and deepening interactions of the globe's different cultures and traditions. A hundred years from now, when our children's children look back at the start of this new millennium, an enlightened merging will be the overwhelming fact of our century. If we prosper, it will be because we have shared the best of our own heritage, and have learned from the wisdom of the other traditions we encounter.

This is as true in the artistic realm, as it is in social and political spheres. I am convinced that the most potent and exciting music of our time has nothing to do with the twelve tone row, or aleatory music, or minimalism, or grunge, or punk, or any of the other fashionable trends that come in and go out of favor. My ears tell me something different. The oldest musical traditions have suddenly become new again, incorporating fresh DNA into their own rich genetic heritage. In short, we are living in an age of musical fusion, and only beginning to map out its mysterious and promising landscape.

For many of us, this fusion is a relatively new development. But for the musicians of North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula, it is a fact of life, a reality over a thousand years old. Here the sonic genealogy draws from a dazzling panoply of root sources -- Arabic, Castilian, Jewish, Romany and African, among others. If, as I believe, the most important musical development of the modern age has been the détente between African and European traditions, then this special geography should be an especially fertile source of great music, encapsulating in its own history the critical nexus where these two cultures first learned to co-exist. Their local fusion is now our global mandate.

The music of Al-Andalus is thus both the sound of the past and of the future. It advances in the footsteps of the oldest, continuous tradition of art music, the extraordinary Andalusian heritage of North Africa perhaps the world's first fusion music but also is sensitive to the other sonic streams of our global village. Tarik and Julian Banzi have coined the term "Contemporary Andalusian" to describe their unique, deeply moving music. I believe that this could be a development as fruitful as Astor Piazzolla's, when he shocked the Argentinean establishment with his "Nuevo Tango." Piazzolla understood, and his listeners soon learned to their delight, that the old tango tradition had been itself a result of musical miscegnation, and thus its future could not be a static deference to the past, but must reflect a passionate embrace of the multicultural imperative to merge and mutate. The music of Alchemy reflects this same happy admixture of the venerable and the modern, creating a sound that is as familiar as an old friend, but as fresh and invigorating as a Mediterranean breeze--Ted Gioia

Ted Gioia is a pianist / composer and the author of several highly acclaimed books on music. He was one of the founders of Stanford University's jazz studies program and served on the faculty of Stanford's Department of Music. His most recent book The History of Jazz was selected as one of the
20 best books of the year by The Washington Post, was honored as a notable book of the year by The New York Times and was chosen as best non-fiction book of the year by the Bay Area Book Reviewers' Association.
------


Casidas, noubas, cantigas as living, breathing art forms. Al-Andalus’s 'Alchemy' is the sound of the past and of the future. Here, the Banzi's advance the oldest, continuous tradition of art music, the extraordinary Andalusian heritage. Alchemy's sonic genealogy draws from a rich array of root sources -- Arabic, Castilian, Jewish, Romany and African to create a refreshing, contemporary, contemplative music that unites the East & West.

Recorded in the Banzi's home in Tangier, Morocco 2005-6

"Unique, deeply moving music as familiar as an old friend, but as fresh and invigorating as a Mediterranean breeze"

"a development as fruitful as Astor Piazzolla's, when he shocked the Argentinean establishment with his "Nuevo Tango"- Ted Gioia


Alchemy is a truly holistic treatment of al-andalus, a rich tapestry of tradtional Andalusian nouba, Cantiga & a Sephardic lullaby accompanied by the oud, Alchemy brings together diverse elements to create something new.

Prehaps our most "traditional" album to date. All acoustic and beautifully recorded in our Tangier studio overlooking the straights of Gibraltar toward Spain.

This is the quartet we are currently touring in Europe. The new formation is comprised of Tarik & Julia Banzi together with new members Noureddine Chekara & Virtudes Sanchez. You can read more about them below.

Alchemy makes perfect music to listen to while you are reading The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dreams, a wonderful book written by Paulo Coelho. Through our varied cd's you can listen to the soundscape that permiates the travels of Santiago. Truly, "when you really want something to happen, the whole universe conspires so that your wish comes true!" (quote from the old king in The Alchemist).


---------

Additional Linear Note Information
-Our programming represents three palatable manifestations' of the Andalusian legacy: Arabo-Andalusi' Judeo-Spanish (Ladino) Medieval Spanish and Flamenco musics.

*1,2, 4, 6, 9 Nouba excerpts: The Moroccan Andalusian repertoire consists of eleven noubat (song cycles) of vocal and instrumental suites. A complete nouba would take approximately 5-7 hours to perform. However, each nouba is divided into five main movements (mizan/mawazin). A performance is normally limited to playing a succession of extracts from several mawazn. As in the Andalusi tradition, we perform sections of the nouba, together with vocal and instrumental improvisations. The poetic texts come from the 1786 collection on Andalusian songs compiled by the scholar from Tetuan, Morocco, Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Haik. The al-Haik has become one of the most important works on Andalusian music. It is an invaluable source in demonstrating continuity with the past and documenting the unbroken chain of ear witness accounts.

(1) Casida de La Muchacha Dorada (Caisda of the Golden Girl) (6:05) Music: T&J Banzi. Lyrics: Federico Garcia Lorca. Virtudes Sanchez & Noureddine Chkara compliment each other in Spanish & Arabic casida's. The casida is a short, rhymed, fixed verse form in Arabic poetry. Lorca's casida's are free adaptations of the Arabic poetry written in honor of the Arabic-Grenadine poets of medieval Spain whom he knew only in translation. Noureddine later sings a nouba section from the Al Haik, Sana 25, Bacit Shoughl.
The golden girl bathed in the water, and the water turned golden.
The wet girl was white in the water, and the water ablaze.
The golden girl was was a white heron, and the water gilded her
Ay... far from home. Ay... I've been away for a long time, with no friend to give me company.
Time is not bringing me what I love. I find myself with a heart... that doesn't help me.
A soul of kings ... a poor mans reality.

(2) Al-Boustan (The Garden) San'a Insiraf Btayhi al Maya San'a (3:05) Trad. Nouba
The garden is attractive and ornamented. Where is a lover who is patient?
Poor is one who is in love and not forgiven. Ay, what a sunset...yellow golden.
It ignites in me the fire of desire. In a high, radiant setting,
filled with refined souls and intelligent melodies. Oh, sunset don't hurry me...
let me enjoy the shelter of this reunion. Between us, the cup is passed, with no censure or guilt.

(3) Cantiga de Santa Maria #100 (3:39) Trad.
The Cantigas of Santa Maria were made for the 13th century scholar-king Alfonso el Sabio (the wise) of Castile and Leon who lived in Spain(1252-1284). Regarded as perhaps the most outstanding example of the depiction of performance of secular music of the 13th century, the Cantigas provide important musical and pictorial evidence about the multicultural past of Christian Spain as well as providing a glimpse of the many contributions of Jewish & Islamic civilization on Medieval Europe.
Holy Mary, star of the day, show us the way to God & guide us.
Your wisdom can guide us toward paradise where God preserves joy and laughter for ever.

(4) Housnan Ishtahar fe Garnata (A Beauty Famed in Granada) Mizan Qaym wa nisf, San'a Shoughl Tushiya. (3:07) Trad. Nouba
Oh your beauty. Oh.. renowned throughout Granada
In Granada, you alone....Oh, grace of the youth.

(5) Jinete (Rider's Song) (6:06) Music: Banzi. Lyrics: Federico Garcia Lorca. Lorca's 'Canciones' are said to have a "transcendental romantic sensibility with a note of elegiac melancholy" where Lorca reached the "pinnacle of his lyricism."
Cordoba. Far away and alone. Black pony, big moon, and olives in my saddlebag.
Although I know the roads, I'll never reach Cordoba
Through the plain, through the wind, black pony, red moon.
Death is looking at me, from the towers of Cordoba.
How long a road, how valiant my pony. Ahi, that death should wait me, before I reach Cordoba.
Cordoba. Far away and alone.

(6)Tushiya Al-Istihilal (3:42) Trad. Andalusi'

(7) Durme Donzella (Sleep beautiful child) (Ladino Lullaby)(5:57) Music: Banzi. Lyrics: Trad.
A Judeo-Spanish lullaby, sung in Ladino and accompanied by the oud.
Sleep, sleep, my beautiful child. Sleep, sleep, without worry or sorrow
Here is your slave whose only desire is to watch over your sleep with the greatest of love
Sleep, sleep my beautiful child. Sleep beautiful, without worry or sorrow
Listen, feel the sound of my guitar. Listen beautiful girl, to the song of my sorrows.

(8) Alchemy (3:07) Music: Banzi. Oud & flamenco guitar improvisation rooted in the 12 beat toque flamenco Solea.' The oud is the parent of the guitar. The guitar marks the 12 beat signature phrase from the flamenco toque (song form) Solea,' one of two central trunks of flamenco. As a dance, the Solea is slow, expressive, moody, building and considered the 'mother of flamenco song. Oud & guitar, flamenco & andalusi,' male and female, merge to create something new.

(9) Aklie abbah (She took my mind) San'a Shoughl Zajal mizan qaym wa nisf (2:54) Trad. Nouba
She took my mind, oh Muslims... She who we all love. How much do we love her?
despite all these years and we can't forget her. We pass the night with our desire.
For no one can survive a liver wound even if ones poor little heart is made of iron.
Ay, he loves the beautiful, witty girl with the black eyes and curved eyebrows.

(10) Conversation (7:26) Banzi/Chkara. An improvised Andalusian duet with Andalusian kamanja (violin) & darbuka (clay drum). This improvised piece captures two old friends of Tetuani Andalusian music coming together for a musical 'chat.'

(11) Granadina (Live) (7:43) Music: Banzi. Commemorating great flamenco guitarist Pepe Habichuela, of Granada. Recorded live in Tacoma, WA at Pacific Lutheran University in Lagerquist Recital Hall. at a concert for the 17th annual meeting for the Guild of American Luthiers (2004). The prologue is Julia's adaptatiion of a Pepe Habichuela piece (used with permission). We also dedicate this to our much missed friend, luthier supreme and Renaissance man Bob Lumberg and all the wonderful luthier folks at GAL (www.luth.org). Without our luthier friends, we would have no instruments to play on... thank you for shaping the wood so that we can shape the sound!

---

Tarik Banzi: oud, guitar, snitra, bass, percussion Julia Banzi: flamenco guitar
Noureddine Chkara: violin, voice Virtudes Sanchez: Voice

Introduction Text: Ted Gioia (www.tedgioia.com)

Calligraphy: Risa Gettler (www.inkcredible.org ) Cover 'Alchemy' written in Visigothic Versals,
the 'hand' (font), exclusive to Spain used in the Beatus' from mid 800's thru mid 1100's CE.

Recorded, mixed & mastered in Al-Andalus studio, Tangier, Morocco. Excp. 11, recorded live
Lagerquist Recital Hall, Tacoma WA. & #8 Recorded Billy Oskay Studio (www. bigredstudio.com)

Typesetting: Julia Banzi. Photography: Elena Delgado
Artwork & Graphic Design: Tarik Banzi
Thank you to Max Horowitz, Ted Gioia, Risa Gettler, Billy Oskay

--

Alchemy Track list:

*1,2, 4, 6, 9 Nouba excerpts: The Moroccan Andalusian repertoire consists of eleven noubat (song cycles) of vocal and instrumental suites. A complete nouba would take approximately 5-7 hours to perform. However, each nouba is divided into five main movements (mizan/mawazin). A performance is normally limited to playing a succession of extracts from several mawazn. As in the Andalusi tradition, we perform sections of the nouba, together with vocal and instrumental improvisations. The poetic texts come from the 1786 collection on Andalusian songs compiled by the scholar from Tetuan, Morocco, Muhammad ibn al-Hasan al-Haik. The al-Haik has become one of the most important works on Andalusian music. It is an invaluable source in demonstrating continuity with the past and documenting the unbroken chain of ear witness accounts.

(1) Casida de La Muchacha Dorada (Caisda of the Golden Girl) (6:05) Music: T&J Banzi. Lyrics: Federico Garcia Lorca. Virtudes Sanchez & Noureddine Chkara compliment each other in Spanish & Arabic casida's. The casida is a short, rhymed, fixed verse form in Arabic poetry. Lorca's casida's are free adaptations of the Arabic poetry written in honor of the Arabic-Grenadine poets of medieval Spain whom he knew only in translation. Noureddine later sings a nouba section from the Al Haik, Sana 25, Bacit Shoughl.
Lyrics (translated from Spanish) "The golden girl bathed in the water, and the water turned golden. The wet girl was white in the water, and the water ablaze. The golden girl was was a white heron, and the water gilded her.
Lyrics (translated from Arabic) "Ay... far from home. Ay... I've been away for a long time, with no friend to give me company. Time is not bringing me what I love. I find myself with a heart... that doesn't help me. A soul of kings ... a poor mans reality."

(2) Al-Boustan (The Garden) San'a Insiraf Btayhi al Maya San'a (3:05) Trad. Nouba
Lyrics (translated from Arabic) "The garden is attractive and ornamented. Where is a lover who is patient? Poor is one who is in love and not forgiven. Ay, what a sunset...yellow golden. It ignites in me the fire of desire. In a high, radiant setting, filled with refined souls and intelligent melodies. Oh, sunset don't hurry me... let me enjoy the shelter of this reunion. Between us, the cup is passed, with no censure or guilt."

(3) Cantiga de Santa Maria #100 (3:39) Trad.
The Cantigas of Santa Maria were made for the 13th century scholar-king Alfonso el Sabio (the wise) of Castile and Leon who lived in Spain(1252-1284). Regarded as perhaps the most outstanding example of the depiction of performance of secular music of the 13th century, the Cantigas provide important musical and pictorial evidence about the multicultural past of Christian Spain as well as providing a glimpse of the many contributions of Jewish & Islamic civilization on Medieval Europe.
Lyrics (translated) "Holy Mary, star of the day, show us the way to God & guide us. Your wisdom can guide us toward paradise where God preserves joy and laughter for ever."

(4) Housnan Ishtahar fe Garnata (A Beauty Famed in Granada) Mizan Qaym wa nisf, San'a Shoughl Tushiya. (3:07) Trad. Nouba
Lyrics (translated from Arabic): "Oh your beauty. Oh.. renowned throughout Granada. In Granada, you alone....Oh, grace of the youth."

(5) Jinete (Rider's Song) (6:06) Music: Banzi. Lyrics: Federico Garcia Lorca. Lorca's 'Canciones' are said to have a "transcendental romantic sensibility with a note of elegiac melancholy" where Lorca reached the "pinnacle of his lyricism."
Lyrics (translated from Spanish): "Cordoba. Far away and alone. Black pony, big moon, and olives in my saddlebag. Although I know the roads, I'll never reach Cordoba. Through the plain, through the wind, black pony, red moon. Death is looking at me, from the towers of Cordoba. How long a road, how valiant my pony. Ahi, that death should wait me, before I reach Cordoba. Cordoba. Far away and alone."

(6)Tushiya Al-Istihilal (3:42) Trad. Andalusi'

(7) Durme Donzella (Sleep beautiful child) (Ladino Lullaby)(5:57) Music: Banzi. Lyrics: Trad.
A Judeo-Spanish lullaby, sung in Ladino and accompanied by the oud.
Lyrics (translated from Ladino) : "Sleep, sleep, my beautiful child. Sleep, sleep, without worry or sorrow.. Here is your slave whose only desire is to watch over your sleep with the greatest of love Sleep, sleep my beautiful child. Sleep beautiful, without worry or sorrow. Listen, feel the sound of my guitar. Listen beautiful girl, to the song of my sorrows."

(8) Alchemy (3:07) Music: Banzi. Oud & flamenco guitar improvisation rooted in the 12 beat toque flamenco Solea.' The oud is the parent of the guitar. The guitar marks the 12 beat signature phrase from the flamenco toque (song form) Solea,' one of two central trunks of flamenco. As a dance, the Solea is slow, expressive, moody, building and considered the 'mother of flamenco song. Oud & guitar, flamenco & andalusi,' male and female, merge to create something new.

(9) Aklie abbah (She took my mind) San'a Shoughl Zajal mizan qaym wa nisf (2:54) Trad. Nouba
Lyrics (translated from Arabic): "She took my mind, oh Muslims... She who we all love. How much do we love her? Despite all these years and we can't forget her. We pass the night with our desire. For no one can survive a liver wound even if ones poor little heart is made of iron. Ay, he loves the beautiful, witty girl with the black eyes and curved eyebrows."

(10) Conversation (7:26) Banzi/Chkara. An improvised Andalusian duet with Andalusian kamanja (violin) & darbuka (clay drum). This improvised piece captures two old friends of Tetuani Andalusian music coming together for a musical 'chat.'

(11) Granadina (Live) (7:43) Music: Banzi. Commemorating great flamenco guitarist Pepe Habichuela, of Granada. Recorded live in Tacoma, WA at Pacific Lutheran University in Lagerquist Recital Hall. at a concert for the 17th annual meeting for the Guild of American Luthiers (2004). The prologue is Julia's adaptatiion of a Pepe Habichuela piece (used with permission). We also dedicate this to our much missed friend, luthier supreme and Renaissance man Bob Lumberg and all the wonderful luthier folks at GAL (www.luth.org). Without our luthier friends, we would have no instruments to play on... thank you for shaping the wood so that we can shape the sound!

----

TARIK BANZI (AL-PANZI) (oud, ney, percussion) was born to one of the old Andalusian families (in Spanish) of Tetouan, Morocco who trace their roots back to Al-Andalus. He grew up immersed in the Andalusian tradition. Tarik later lived in Madrid, Spain throughout the 80's & moved in Flamenco, Jazz, and Middle Eastern music circles. Tarik formed the group Al-Fatihah with Judeo-Spanish musicologist Dr. Javier Sanchez, which has been recognized in Spain as the first group of Middle Eastern music. At the same time Tarik was collaborating and recording with flamenco masters such as Paco de Lucia, Manolo Sanlucar, Enrique Morente, Jorge Pardo & Carlos Benavent where Tarik introduced such mainstays into the flamenco sound as the darbuka (clay or metal drum) and Udu (clay pot drum). In the late 80's Tarik & Julia formed the group Amal together with Maria Ahmed, Rasgui Boujemaa. Tarik & Rasgui's students Fain Duenas and Vicente Molina later went on to form the group Radio Tarifa. In addition to his musical leanings, Tarik is an accomplished visual artist who completed his Doctoral studies in Fine Arts at the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain (Ph.D (a.b.d.). You can see some of his works on this website (here). Tarik is the artistic director, co-founder, and composer of Al-Andalus.

JULIA BANZI: (flamenco guitar, viola, percussion) is a Colorado native who began her flamenco guitar studies in San Francisco. She later relocated to Spain for a decade where she continued to challenge the status quo as one of a very few female flamenco guitarists worldwide. In Andalucia's Granada, Sanlucar de Barameda, and later at Madrid's Amor de Dios studios, Julia has studied with some of Spain's finest guitarists including Isidro Muñoz, Manolo Sanlucar, David Serva, Felipe Maya & Rafael Morales. She later immersed herself in Classical Arabic & Ladino music & language and Classical Andalusian Music. Julia is currently working on her Doctoral dissertation in Ethnomusicology Ph.D. (a.b.d.) at the University of California at Santa Barbara (U.C.S.B.). Her MA thesis "Women's Andalusian Orchestras of Tetouan, Morocco" (02) is available through ProQuest Digital Dissertations(#1413956). You may read (click here) or download a printable .pdf of her thesis abstract here. She is also preparing a book on her interviews and photographs with the late master of Andalusian music, el Maestro Mohammed ben Arbi Temsamani. Julia is honored to have been selected as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar.

Noureeddine Chkara: Famous throughout Morocco, the Chkara's are among the most faithful interpreters of Arab-Andalusian music. Through his musical collaborations with musicians such as Yehudi Menuhin, Michael Lyman & Enrique Morente, the famed Abdesadek Chekara ensemble has long received international recognition. In addition to his participation as the youngest member in the Chekara ensemble, Noureddine has been a professor of Andalusian music at the Tetuan Conservatory of Music since 1983. Besides the learning he received at home, Noureddine studied with Mohammed L'arbi Temmsamani, Mohammed Harazam, Mohammed ben Aid, Haj `Abdelkrim Raïss, & Mohammed El Brihi--truly the giants of Moroccan Andalusian music.
Of equal importance is Noureddine's lifelong participation in the Sufi Zawia Al-Harraqiya, a religious brotherhood recognized as one of the most influential Sufi orders connected to Andalusian music traditions in Morocco. Sufism, like Buddhism, is a way of life. It develops an inner way to mystical union with God. Noureddine's unfailing participation as a musician in the Zawia which connects with God through Andalusian music has been a constant affirmation of music as something with profound implications. Spirituality fills Noureddine, transmitting a calm and tranquil search, reaching out to bring us closer to what Sufism refers to as 'the divine.'

Virtudes Sanchez: (vocals) from Conil de la Frontera, Spain. Conil is located in cradle flamenco, southern Andalucia. She is part of a new wave of vocalists that is descending upon Andalusian folk music, ready to defend and to enrich different schools of cante. Her voice her Andalusian heritage, flamenco, canto Lirico Espanol as well as her classical vocal training received later in life at conservatories in Conil, Sevilla and Madrid. Marrying tradition and this young cantora presents varied offerings with a capacity to look outward toward other terrain's her musicality and sense of rhythm project a clear intention to maintain Andalucia's vitality marrying tradition and progress with skill and know how.


Reviews


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Karen Patton

On automatic replay on my CD player all weekend long!
Wonderfully rich tapestry, very balanced musicianship with evocative lyricism and enticing rhythms. Instantaneously satisfying and made me want to hear much, much more from these musicians. Some pieces stuck in my head for days (a good sign of their unique stamp). Music that will stay in my rotation for many years, I suspect.

Mimoun el Ouarti

An amazing creation!
This is another masterpiece of Tarik & Julia joined by Maistro NourEddine Chekara. I have seen them performing together in Belgium and that was an amazing combination and creation too. This CD invites you to listen carefully and to enter into a world of beauty.

SMOTHERS MAGAZINE (EDITORS PICK)

Moves you deep within with stirring strings and vocals....one album that truly l
Al-Andalus, Tarik & Julia Banzi — Alchemy

Contemporary Andalusian music that moves you deep within with stirring strings and vocals. Delightful instrumentation that includes snitra, oud, violin, flamenco guitar, percussion, bass, and guitar provide the musical landscape that the vocals float over top of, whispering down from the heavens into our ears. Garnering their roots in Jewish, Romanian, Arabic, and Castilian music, “Alchemy” is one album that truly lives up to its name. Tarik and Julia Banzi coined the term “Contemporary Andalusian”, which describes their holistic approach to Andalusian compositions that combines Andalusi, Judeo-Spanish, and Spanish Anadalusian music. Truly vibrant, “Alchemy” will inspire a generation of future musicians from around the world.

Andrew Pellier

Very moving and inspiring... transported me to another time and place!
I was very moved and inspired by this cd. While listening to it, I felt like I was transported to another time and place... far from the modern world. It was very soothing and relaxing. Thank you Al-Andalus for yet another beautiful album.

DZia

Happy Happy me to find this CD!
I'm always looking for interesting music that is relaxing, smooth, complex and engading. A very hard mix to find and this fits the bill. Some songs are very beautiful and some are more interesting, but they all come together in a perfect mix that is a sure fire 5 star!

Shadab Hashmi

A sophisticated and evocative rendering of traditional Andalusi music
Each piece is unique and musically distinctive. I especially liked the rendition of Lorca's poem. The Arabic singing is also beautiful. The spirit of the three Abrahamic cultures meeting in music gives this collection a special appeal. Bravo!