The Creamies | Cherry on the Top etc.

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Reggae: Reggae rock Avant Garde: Noise Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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Cherry on the Top etc.

by The Creamies

Anarchic Reggae'n'Roll
Genre: Reggae: Reggae rock
Release Date: 

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1. Big Tough Toys
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5:32 $0.99
2. Clean
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5:03 $0.99
3. Tribesman a come
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5:20 $0.99
4. Bingo Erotica
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5:33 $0.99
5. Kingston
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3:26 $0.99
6. Prosecution (ain't no solution)
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3:44 $0.99
7. Cherry on the Top
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4:57 $0.99
8. One World
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4:27 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The Creamies were formed in London in 1980 by singer/songwriter/producer Harold Burgon (under the moniker of Big H). The band’s live shows were downright anarchy, with a blasting rock/reggae/dub energy and much excursioning into the crowd with Big H goading the audience to participate or riot. The band always started the show with a song called ‘Damage’ which commenced with a barage of 5 flourishes akin to a stadium band’s grandest finale. After this, the place was totally ‘fired-up’. The onslaught continued unabated until, on occasions, most of the audience was on-stage and bellowing the choruses, beating cowbells/drums and equipment and dancing their asses off. The shows always ended with their anthem ‘One World’ which was known to last up to one hour with guest musicians and audience alike taking risky solos. Many promoters barred the group from their venues after they had experienced the euphoric abandon that threatened their public-order licences.

The band only released one independent single in 1984 “Cherry on the Top” which got a lot of play on Indie radio, but never charted. In 1982 EMI records got interested in the group, but fought shy of signing them as their head of publishing said that the lyrical content was “way too political” for a major label like EMI with their squeaky clean catalogue (possibly a ‘company policy’ after their run-in with the Sex Pistols). But the band recorded most of their catalogue, eight songs of which are on ‘Cherry on the Top etc.’ The band were voted as finalists of the 1983 ‘Battle of the Bands’ competition. But the Creamies pulled out of the competition and never played the final, as they realized that they could have won and suffered under an exclusive and draconian record/publishing/management contract. This withdrawal and an exposé in the ‘Evening Standard’ (orchestrated by Big H) eventually led to the collapse of the ‘Battle of the Bands’ company and a law suit from their distributors R.C.A. Records.

The Creamies became a favourite group of the ‘Rock Against Racism’ circuit and performed for many political rallies. They also featured on shows for ‘Cast-New Variety’- a circuit of London gigs set up by Roland Muldoon. The original line-up was Big H(vocals/guitar & organ) Mick Posen (lead guitar)
Phil Hardy(bass) and Bill Carson(drums). In 1982 Phil left and the late Peter(Pedro) Hembley took over on bass.The same year, Bill Carson joined the re-formed Peter Green/Fleetwood Mack group. Greg Roberts took over the drums and played with the Creamies for two years before joining Big Audio Dynamite. In 1982 the band augmented to an eight-piece with Joan Izod on tenor sax and two backing vocalists, one of whom was Angie Mclusky who later fronted ‘The Wild Colonials’ in Los Angeles.

Harold Burgon now lives and works in Spain. As a music producer/sound engineer he has worked with artists such as The Godafthers, Red Lorry Yellow Lorry, My Bloody Valentine, George Harrison, Steve Winwood, The Pogues, The Dubliners, Screaming Blue Messiahs, Gary Lucas and Spanish artists such as Enrique Morente, Estrella Morente, Emilio Maya, Taller de Compás, Pull, Fiona May, Mona Lisa, After Prozac and many more besides.


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meenu

nice
very good