Dandy Don Logan | Mister Stan

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Easy Listening: Crooners/Vocals Latin: Latin Pop Moods: Solo Male Artist
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Mister Stan

by Dandy Don Logan

Easy listening, pop, rock, folk and latin; this old man does everything from tango to two step.
Genre: Easy Listening: Crooners/Vocals
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1. My Song
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3:06 $0.99
2. When You Smile
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3. Desperado With a Heart of Stone
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2:57 $0.99
4. Conversation Over Dinner
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5:48 $0.99
5. Mister Stan
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4:08 $0.99
6. King Louie's Place
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7. Dog With a Bone
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8. Hope in You
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9. Sacagawea
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10. New England Feeling
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11. Into Her Mind
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12. Too Much
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13. Mardi Gras
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14. I Remember Clarabell
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15. Beautiful Morning
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16. Red Bucket
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17. Hot Rod Fantasy
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18. Ferris Wheels
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19. Shyster
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20. Louisiana Purchase
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21. Xyloid Bridge
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22. Lady of My Dreams
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"DANDY" DON LOGAN'S CD IS AN IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTION


BACK IN THE '50S, RADIO PERSONALITY DON LOGAN CAME TO SHREVEPORT FROM FORT WORTH, TEXAS, TO REPLACE MAC SANDERS, A POPULAR KEEL RADIO DISC JOCKEY WHO LEFT SHREVEPORT FOR LARGER PASTURES (ULTIMATELY BECOMING A FORCE IN SATELLITE RADIO FROM CHICAGO UNDER HIS REAL NAME, RON BAXLEY).

LOGAN, THEN IN HIS 20S AND NEWLY MARRIED, WORKED UNDER THE NAME "DANDY DON", CONTINUING WITH KEEL UNTIL 1967, WHEN HE WENT TO WORK FOR STAN "THE RECORD MAN" LEWIS'S PAULA RECORDS CORPORATION. WITH PAULA RECORDS, LOGAN WORKED IN SALES, PROMOTION, AND PRODUCTION AND SERVED AS THE COMPANY'S VICE PRESIDENT.

LATER LOGAN RETURNED TO RADIO, WORKIGN WITH KRMD, KTAL, KBCL AND KCOZ, ALL SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER MARKET AREA STATIONS. HE WAS ALSO CLUB DJ AT SANSONE'S RESTAURANT, WHICH MANY WILL RECALL AS ONE OF THE PREMIER DINING ESTABLISHMENTS OF SHREVEPORT DURING THE '60S THROUGH '80S.

With format changes and the decline
of radio, Logan left the business in 1980,
going to work for the State Child Support
Division office in Shreveport. But Don
continued to do something he had always
done: write songs - personal, meaningful
songs - especially after his grandson's
tragic death in 2002.


Now "Dandy" Don Logan, veteran Shreve-
port radio personality, songwriter, singer
and musician - with pop, country, easy
listening, a dash of rock-'n-roll and every-
thing in between - has released a compact
disc of his work entitled "Dandy" Don Logan: 22 Original Songs Including Mister Stan.

Mister Stan, as the CD is called on Logan's website, contains 22 original songs by Logan, including two about last year's Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial, one about Louisiana's Carnival season entitled "Mardi Gras" and, of course, the title song "Mister Stan" about Stan Lewis, a Shreveport music and business legend (though some insist - wrongly, according to Logan - that the song is about Elvis, who incidentally came here in 1954 partly owing to Stan the Record Man).

While Logan also insists that his songs are "just songs, not history," they really are history as well. Logan was a part of local music, recording and radio history and his music, much of it anyway, is about that very history. For example, Wolfman Jack was another Shreveport radio personality of the '60s. He was with the infamous station XERF, which was based out of Shreveport but had its transmitting towers in Mexico. That story is told in song by Logan on "Mister Stan," as is the story of Shreveport's importance in the radio world of that day. If a song made it big in Shreveport, radio stations in such markets as Birmingham, New Orleans, Atlanta, Houston and Dallas would pick it up. Shreveport was sort of a litmus test of what would be a hit elsewhere in the South in those days. Logan lived all that and writes and sings about it. His CD is an important contribution to local music and music history.

Mister Stan, the cover of which features a '30s era photo of Logan and his mom and dad, taken at a time shortly after his birth, is released on the CAL label and is distributed by fellow Paula Records veteran, Frankie Spano's Frankie's One Stop, one of the South's premier record distribution companies, located in Shreveport. It is available for sale (and can be ordered where it isn't) at most record stores in the state, including locally at Ace Lewis's Southfield Music (owned by Stan's brother Ace), Disc Daddy and the commercial chains, and is available at Logan's website - which is also rich in history and personal memoirs of Shreveport radio during its golden years - at www.logonlogan.net and www.dandydonlogan.com as well as from internet music sources such as CD Baby, CD Street, Planet CD and others. It retails for $15.

ARTICLE BY ERIC J. BROCK - THE FORUM - 9-15-2004 HARRIET FERRELL, editor ericjbrock@bellsouth.net


.......MORE ABOUT DANDY DON.....

DANDY DON LOGAN, a former world-famous DJ, now a legitimate singer/songwriter.

In 1967, Logan became a vice-president of the Jewel-Paula Record complex. Over the next 10 years, he directed, produced, wrote songs, signed artists, you name it.he did it. "Judy in Disguise" was the only million seller the label had in 1968. Logan traveled with Ronnie Lewis, John Fred and the "Playboy Band" to do the Jerry Blavit show and the Johnny Carson Show on NBC which was emanating from Radio City Music Hall in New York at the time.

"I had listened to Hoss Allen, Gene Nobles and John R Richbourg on radio when I was still playing popular and country music on radio and I must admit that being in the record business and dealing with them and other notable DJs was a great thrill for a former DJ, like me. The record business was a potpourri of individuals, both good and bad. I always tried to be the good guy, but sometimes you had to flex your muscles. Stan Lewis was once threatened by Don Roby of Duke-Peacock over a group called the Carter Brothers and Buddy Ace. He said something about putting Stan in a box. Roby disliked us intensely and bad mouthed us every chance he had. "Major" Bill Smith, a former associate and friend of mine, threatened to put a contract out on me when I signed J. Frank Wilson, the guy who did "Last Kiss", to a Paula contract, unaware that J. Frank was still under contract to Bill. In an industry that was slow to pay, it was common to resort to threats of violence. Usually, the threats were just that. Others like Morris Levy, we called him "Moishe", wound up in jail. Levy inspired more fear than any other single record mogul in the industry. Nat Tarnopol of Brunswick Records was acquitted on thirty-eight counts of fraud and the conspiracy count he was found guilty on, was later overturned. Nate McCalla never made it to court, he just died under mysterious circumstances and some writer once called all of us in the record business at the time, a bunch of cutthroats who cheated everybody out of everything they could, every time they could, every way they could. That remark never bothered me. I knew the reference was not about us."

Logan also formed his own production company. He booked bands and emceed shows by such stars as Paul Revere and the Raiders, The Monkees, The Uniques, Swinging Medallions, Willie Mitchell, Dave Clark Five, The Rolling Stones, Sam the Sham and other hot groups in the Shreveport area. He also owned Cabriolet Music, Cord Record Corporation and the Cal and Memorial Records.

After he departed Jewel-Paula Records, Logan tried a comeback in local radio. He was not successful in reclaiming the audience that once was his. Logan reminisces on his radio career this way. "When I came to Shreveport, DJs like Bill Randle, Alan Freed and Dick Clark had already paved the way for rock and roll on radio and TV. Hollywood discovered rock and roll in 1955. "Blackboard Jungle" featured "Rock Around the Clock" and because of the movie, it became the first rock and roll tune to reach number one on the charts. Gordon McLendon and Todd Storz had invented Top 40 radio and the jocks, who had been at KEEL before me, made the station number one in the market. They put a lady named Marie Gifford in as manager and she was top-drawer all the way".

"When I came back to radio, FM was the thing. On radio, there was an overabundance of youthful talent. You had Jeff Edmond & Melinda Cowart at a new station, started by my fellow co-worker Billy Wilson, who pulled off a ratings coup. That team was probably the most popular radio show ever in the market and Melinda is still doing great things. TV news had Liz Swain and Al Pierce or Carl Pendley and Karen Adams and they would have been tops in any market. I had aged and no longer had youth to fall back on, however I did manage to work up to the program manager job at KCOZ, the last remaining good music station in the market. I brought it back to a number 4 overall rating in the market, but it was not good enough and they changed the station format to urban and my radio comeback attempt ended".

"For all things there is a time and a season. In my youth, it was time for radio and I enjoyed it to the fullest. I ate, drank and slept with radio on my mind. The season of my life changed when I turned 30 and the record business looked inviting. I accepted the invitation and dealt with some memorable individuals".


STANLEY J. LEWIS (STAN'S RECORD SHOP) STAN, THE RECORD MAN

Logan met "Stan the Record Man" shortly after coming to KEEL radio in Shreveport. Logan immediately liked the energetic Italian. Lewis went out of his way to provide Logan and others at the station with "hit" records before they actually became hits. He has the inside info on what had broken to Dallas, San Francisco or other major markets and Logan and the others at KEEL could play off this information and lead the pack in their area.

"You would have to credit a portion of our success to the musical knowledge that Stan shared with us", says Logan. "KEEL had a really tight crew. I was very young and had never worked for a number one station. They brought me in to replace Ron Baxley. Baxley was the best that I had ever heard of. I never got to hear him on the air, but he was tough and in his prime. He could get listeners all over town to honk the horn on their cars on his command and I am told the result would be one continuous long blast that could be heard from block to block over the city. Needless to say, I failed as the replacement for Baxley. Thankfully, they put me in another time slot and Rusty Reynolds took over Ron's old air slot. I would never work that slot again as I was soon to become the morning man at the station".

Logan went on to become the program director for KEEL and Stan continued to become more successful, building a larger warehouse for his distribution company and starting his own record labels. Logan played many of the records that Stan was involved with, but many others that Stan would have liked the station to play, were not programed.

The station had to be first in the nation to play a record by the Beatles. However, it was on the Vee Jay label and it did not become a hit and Logan and the rest of the KEEL crew were a little reluctant when Stan showed up with a Capital recording by the same group. "Luckily we did play it and got to participate in the largest musical revolution in the history of the record business", Logan remembers.

KEEL was also first in the southwest region to play a record Stan brought by one day by the Kingsmen entitled, "Louie, Louie". They were also tenth in the region to stop playing it after many listener complaints. After much soul searching, station management allowed the jocks to play it one time per show and the record became a monster hit. Logan says, "They even have a "Louie, Louie" parade in Pennsylvania every year. Talk about phenomenal. One of our jocks said the record sounded like it was recorded in a garage! Stan said, "It was!""

Stan found out, quite by accident many years before, that an exclusive recording given to the right station gave him an inside track with the station and national publicity. Don tells the story this way. "Stan got in this shipment of RCA records. Back in those days his business was small , so he would open the shipments, count the records, compare the count to the invoice, etc. That's what he was doing when he found an extra RCA record that was not on the invoice. He looked at the record and saw that it was by Elvis Presley and the title was "All Shook Up". Stan knew all the hot artists, hot records and this was a song title he was not familiar with. He looked for the title in his latest edition of Billboard. There were three Elvis records in the charts, but this was not one of them. Neither was it in the picks nor review section. A smile broke out on his face. He realized that he held in his hand the next release of the hottest new artist in the country. He did not bring this record to KEEL though. Instead, he took it to Joe Monroe, a DJ who had helped Stan in his beginning years, who now owned his own station, KJOE. Joe gave it to his DJ George Carlin, who would become an international comedian later in life, but at that time was in the Air Force and working part time at KJOE. Carlin played the record and became the first radio station in the nation to play this Elvis record. The event made the national news". Gordon McLendon who owned KEEL, is said to have been furious over being beaten in this instance in the Shreveport market and reportedly called everyone he knew in the record business, asking them to boycott Stan. McLendon always thought Stan got the record from D. J. Fontana, who was Elvis' drummer and Stan's cousin, for the express purpose of getting national attention for KJOE and embarrassing McLendon, the inventor of Top 40 radio.

The boycott by McLendon, of product associated with Stan, may have been the initial reason that Stan bought air time throughout the south, selling record packages on stations like KWKH, KAAY, XERF and WLAC. He had personalities like Gatemouth, Hoss Allen, John R Richbourg, Gene Nobles and Wolfman hawking his product on these shows. These programs were extremely popular and artists and record companies were clamoring for Stan to put their product on his shows. He also formed Jewel, Paula, and Ronn Records and things were growing so fast that it was hard to keep up with things. Logan says, " He offered me a part time job and I took it. I had four children and my wife was not working at the time, so the extra money reeled me in. I knew the distribution company was going to be a monster, but I never really imagined that we would do so well with the record labels, much less have a number one pop record."

The job for Logan was soon to become a full-time job. Don became vice-president of Jewel-Paula-Ronn Records. New corporate offices were built and DJ's and music directors, who once did not have the time to talk to someone from Jewel-Paula, became friends on a first name basis. Logan would be active in all facets of the company.

Don says, "We had a great little family company. Stan's wife, Pauline Taglavore Lewis, his son, Lennie, daughter, Susan and brothers Ronnie and A.J. actively participated in its growth and it did become really large at one time. We had some talented artists and gave them more artistic freedom than any of the independent labels around. Many of our records were overlooked because the majors were putting out so much material and if our record did not kick off and start selling immediately, we would get shelved for a new release by an artist who had just come off a good recording. Just because our artists were mostly unknown was no reason for the stations and trade journals to short change them".

Jewel-Paula-Ronn Records had recordings by such artists as Randy Travis, Mickey Gilley, Joe Stampley, The Uniques, John Fred and the Playboys, Charlie Daniels, John Lee Hooker, Little Johnnie Taylor, Ted Taylor, "Big" Joe Turner, Cookie and the Cupcakes, Jewel Akens, Lightning Hopkins, Dale and Grace, Lowell Fulsom, Robert Parker, Aaron Neville, Jimmie Davis and Nat Stuckey.

"I learned a lot from Stan. I enjoyed every minute of being in the record business with him. I met a lot of people who were really talented. I was not a great producer or songwriter or even arranger, but I got to do all those things. I helped design the original Paula label, using a silhouette of his wife, Pauline Taglavore Lewis, in a cameo. Originally, it had a pink background. I especially liked the Jewel label design with the blue background. I have always thought they were very distinctive. When we started Ronn records, I wasted a lot of valuable space by having the Ronn logo taking up the full top half of the label. The label copy tended to look a little cramped on the single and album labels, but everyone liked it so much that it stayed that way for years. Production wise, I really enjoyed over dubbing a Mickey Gilley album that he partially recorded for us when he left the label. I thought it was first rate. However, the label took it back into session when "Urban Cowboy" came out and over dubbed it again with Nashville musicians. I did sessions in all kinds of studios from Nashville to location recording in Rev. Brady Blade's Church".


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