Decomposure | Taking Things Apart

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Electronic: Experimental Electronic: Soundscapes Moods: Type: Experimental
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Taking Things Apart

by Decomposure

An engaging collection of homespun assemblages inspired by an awareness of the constant procession of environmental sound and by an impulse to free sound from the dead,airless clutches of the computer processor.
Genre: Electronic: Experimental
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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time
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1. Scrabble
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5:16 $0.99
2. Matches (extended)
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3:50 $0.99
3. Toy Dj Playset
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2:03 $0.99
4. Drawing
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4:08 $0.99
5. Speech
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6:28 $0.99
6. Sound Card Noise
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3:40 $0.99
7. Skytrain
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4:20 $0.99
8. Piano/toy Electronic Drumsticks
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1:43 $0.99
9. Notepad
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3:29 $0.99
10. Headphones
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2:48 $0.99
11. Cassette Player (acidic Mix)
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2:54 $0.99
12. Interview/60hz
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10:10 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Every day, your ears are flooded with sound. Every day, you're inundated with people, cars, birds, buildings, media; they all send their unique vibrations through the air toward you, even in the quietest moments. You couldn't possibly process it all, you'd be overwhelmed, unable to concentrate. And so you unconsciously ignore those sounds, and instead cover over them with synthetic, studio-controlled sound in the form of music. But what if those unconscious sounds became the music?
'Taking Things Apart' is an album built completely out of those insignificant sounds of life. From a ride on a subway to the lighting of matches, Decomposure condenses those lost moments in sound and brings them to the foreground. From one or two raw sound sources, he constructs unrelenting percussion and sonic textures that sound kind of familiar, but somehow new. It's an accessible, wide-eyed exploration of the imperfect world of sound, listening to life, media, politics, and music itself in a wholly different way. 'Taking Things Apart' finds a high-energy balance between thoughtful, playful and danceable. In fact, let's just come right out and say it: it's the best album of all time. It's also non-fattening. And it prevents heartburn and relieves gas pain. And it saved a busload of young children from being eaten by sharks. And turns oxygen into gold.


Reviews


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Kyle Weiss

Gravedigging for used parts?
This album is every single sound you have heard every day in your life. It's simply been put together in a way you've never heard before. Your garbage disposal, the irritating bastards with horrible music three doors down, scrubbing the wheels of your car, put into something mathematic and concise with chicken wire and hot glue. This music is more 'Stomp' on CD, but much more zen. You might assume listening to someone ping on coffee cups to be a mild fascination at Denny's when you're bored off your ass at 3AM, however, someone's captured and ran with this idea. It's not relaxing and it's not irritating. It doesn't make you want to sleep but you don't want to stay awake. Somewhere between The Future Sound of London and the randomness of The Art of Noise. I suggest listening to it while cooking someting for the first time once you buy it-- which you should.

Phillip Ridlen

Feel-good glitch electronica!
The first time you listen to this CD, it's hard to believe the sources he claims to have taken samples from.

Decomposure has great composition skills. You'll want to be jiving right along with a scrabble board and a box of matches. A beautiful soundscape with rich textures and fun rhythms. You won't regret purchasing this album.