Julie Gibb | All My Yesterdays

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Country: Americana Easy Listening: Adult contemporary Moods: Solo Female Artist
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All My Yesterdays

by Julie Gibb

Canadian-born songwriter, singer, multi-instrumentalist Julie Gibb returns with a melodic and contemplative collection of new songs.
Genre: Country: Americana
Release Date: 

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1. Cleveland
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4:16 $0.99
2. The Spirit Song
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3:48 $0.99
3. All My Yesterdays
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3:10 $0.99
4. Well I Do
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3:19 $0.99
5. No Goodbye
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3:35 $0.99
6. Call Me Baby
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4:06 $0.99
7. Too Soon To Tell
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3:02 $0.99
8. Somebody Still Loves You
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3:03 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
With the release of her sophomore solo album All My Yesterdays, Canadian-born songwriter, singer and multi-instrumentalist Julie Gibb is as difficult to categorize as ever. While her style is reminiscent of many of the writers and musicians who have influenced her, she doesn't particularly sound like anyone else. In the eight songs featured on All My Yesterdays, you'll hear moments of Americana/Adult Contemporary, a little bit of country, and maybe even a hint of modern folk. It's hard to say exactly where she fits. 

Produced by Gibb, All My Yesterdays was completed with a whole lot of help from her friends. The recording process started in Nashville with songwriter/producer/engineer Cliff Goldmacher, who manned the console for the early stages of tracking and enlisted the help of Andrea Zonn (Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, etc) on viola, Glen Caruba (Jimmy Buffett, Sara Evans, etc) on percussion, and Goldmacher played keys himself. A little later on, Tom Bukovac (Sheryl Crow, Keith Urban, etc) came in and added the bass and his guitar wizardry to the songs that Gibb felt her own guitar playing wasn't breathing as much life into the tracks as she wanted. Of the production process, she said, "It was surreal for me, hearing the songs transform as each of the players added their parts-- magical, really".

All My Yesterdays is comprised of eight songs, seven of which Gibb wrote alone and one that was written by her longtime friend, Jeff Cohen, whose songwriting credits include everyone from Sugarland to Ronin Tynan with the London Symphony Orchestra. "It was so important to me for this record to accurately represent where I am musically and emotionally in this moment of my life. All of the albums I've participated in before somehow got away from me, whether it was because I was working in a band situation where my role was determined by what the team called for, or working with producers whose interpretations of what my music should be differed from my own vision. On this project, I needed to be in control. In a lifetime of recording and performing music, this is the first time I have ever felt I was releasing something that truly represented me."

All My Yesterdays covers a lot of sentient territory. It starts with "Cleveland", which tells the story of a woman who finds herself twenty miles from the hometown of a former love and decides to make a long overdue apology call to him, though he has moved on with his life since she left. The album progresses with "The Spirit Song", a heartbreaking missive from a departed spirit to her loved ones. "All My Yesterdays" speaks of self-forgiveness, while "Well I Do" is a song of gratitude, and "Call Me Baby" is an unmistakable call to come-hither. The result is a melodic and contemplative journey through the emotional spectrum. "One of the things that I have always marveled at most about music is the way that a well-crafted lyric or melody can affect you, make you feel somehow connected and less alone in the world. If I have one moment in life when I can bring that to someone else, I will have done what I came to do."


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