Mel Annala | In Your Eyes

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United States - Minnesota

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Folk: Traditional Folk Country: Americana Moods: Featuring Guitar
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In Your Eyes

by Mel Annala

Rural roots, Americana, and familiar country folk music delivered to your heart with a warm voice and driving six and twelve string guitar from the far reaches of Northern Minnesota. Open the windows, dim the lights and turn up the volume.
Genre: Folk: Traditional Folk
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Sitting On Top of the World
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2:32 $0.99
2. In Your Eyes
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2:29 $0.99
3. All Along the Watchtower
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2:41 $0.99
4. Long Black Veil
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3:10 $0.99
5. Cats in the Cradle
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3:39 $0.99
6. Hickory Wind
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2:53 $0.99
7. Dark Disguise
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2:24 $0.99
8. Alberta
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3:17 $0.99
9. House of the Rising Sun
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3:45 $0.99
10. Still the Night
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2:40 $0.99
11. Pick Me Up On Your Way Down
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3:14 $0.99
12. Going Away
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2:56 $0.99
13. Sonora's Death Row
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4:03 $0.99
14. Games People Play
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3:39 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Acoustic six and twelve string guitarist/vocalist. Perfoming Americana, folk and rural roots music. "Mel Annala has put together a solid collection of songs that we all know and love and he has a fine voice to carry them to your heart" Pete Morton, International singer/songwriter; London, England.


Reviews


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Phil S.

Loose and refreshing
I think it’s fair to say Mel Annala is no spring chicken. I’m not sure exactly of his age but reading his website biography, and doing a few sums, I’d say he’s in his early 60s. Also, from what I can ascertain, “In Your Eyes” is his debut record. I imagine some of you might think that’s a bit strange, but not at all. It’s a common enough phenomenon, which usually involves an early, yet unfulfilled career in music, its near abandonment when responsibilities come along like families, mortgages and proper employment, and a return to music when time and financial pressures ease. So it is here. Annala’s music making goes back to the early 1960s and bands like The Agents and folk trio, The Scarcity Of Time. Over the years he’s kept his hand in, playing in part-time wedding bands, country, folk and bar bands, and in 2006, he set out on his own, playing solo shows with a repertoire of traditional favourites and original folk-rock songs.

I imagine “In Your Eyes” pretty much represents his shows; a mix of well-known material with a smattering of his own songs, and all sung with heart-on-the sleeve openness and warmth. For the most part these are songs that Annala has grown up with and of course, he knows them intimately. He opens the album with the Mississippi Sheiks’ “Sitting On Top of the World”, and he plays it fast and lean. Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” retains its drama, as does “Long Black Veil”. Perhaps most surprising of all is his take on “House of the Rising Sun”. Just when you thought it was impossible to do anything new with a song 96% (official made-up statistic) of all guitarists play, Annala manages to make it sound fresh, without doing anything radically different. Of his songs, particular attention should be paid to the title track, which is full of hurt and resignation, and “Dark Disguise”, a Byrds-ian folk rocker with no shortage of hooks and a patented Dylan-esque harmonica solo.