Jocelyn Nelson & Amy Bartram | Ma Guiterre  je te chante - 16th Century guitar solos and chansons

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Classical: Early Music Classical: Renaissance Moods: Featuring Guitar
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Ma Guiterre je te chante - 16th Century guitar solos and chansons

by Jocelyn Nelson & Amy Bartram

Lively and captivating French Renaissance guitar repertoire performed on the four-course guitar, featuring intricate guitar solos plus rarely-heard 16th-century arrangements of French love songs for soprano and guitar, based on dances from the period.
Genre: Classical: Early Music
Release Date: 

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1. Si ce n’est amour qu’est-ce Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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1:48 $0.99
2. Prélude Jocelyn Nelson
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1:01 $0.99
3. Il estoit une fillette en basse-dance, With Demie basse-dance Jocelyn Nelson
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2:16 $0.99
4. Tourdion with plus diminué Jocelyn Nelson
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1:07 $0.99
5. Que te sert amy d’estre ainsi Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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3:38 $0.99
6. Two Fantasies: Fantasie seconde & Fantasie premiere Jocelyn Nelson
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4:10 $0.99
7. Une m’avoit promis (Padvane) Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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4:32 $0.99
8. Pavan & Gaillard Jocelyn Nelson
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3:26 $0.99
9. Mes pas semez Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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3:51 $0.99
10. Two Canons & Duo: Canon in Subdyapenté, Autre Canon, & Duo Jocelyn Nelson
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4:14 $0.99
11. Villanesque Jocelyn Nelson
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1:33 $0.99
12. Conte clare Jocelyn Nelson
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1:08 $0.99
13. Au jour au jour au jour Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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1:24 $0.99
14. Two Bransles: Bransle gay la centure & Bransle gay Jocelyn Nelson
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2:22 $0.99
15. Dieu inconstant Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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5:20 $0.99
16. Two Bransles Jocelyn Nelson
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2:45 $0.99
17. Buffons Jocelyn Nelson
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1:57 $0.99
18. Conte clare Jocelyn Nelson
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1:37 $0.99
19. J’ay le rebours (Pavanne) Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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4:48 $0.99
20. Three Gaillardes Jocelyn Nelson
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3:24 $0.99
21. Margot labourez les vignes Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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1:24 $0.99
22. Contreclare acorde avallée Jocelyn Nelson
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1:59 $0.99
23. La Seraphine acorde avallée Jocelyn Nelson
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4:06 $0.99
24. Tant que vivray Amy Bartram & Jocelyn Nelson
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3:15 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
1) Si ce n’est amour qu’est-ce
Jacques Arcadelt (c. 1507–1568); guitar arr. by Adrian Le Roy (c. 1520–1598) 1:49

2) Prélude 1:01
3) Il estoit une fillette en basse-dance, with Demie basse-dance 2:16
4) Tourdion with plus diminué 1:08
Adrian Le Roy

5) Que te sert amy d’estre ainsi 3:38
Jacques Arcadelt; guitar arr. by Adrian Le Roy
6) Two Fantasies: Fantasie seconde & Fantasie premiere 4:11
Adrian Le Roy

7) Une m’avoit promis (Padvane) 4:32
Adrian Le Roy

8) Pavan & Gaillard 3:26
Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510–after 1560)

9) Mes pas semez 3:51
Adrian Le Roy

10) Two Canons & Duo: Canon in Subdyapenté, Autre Canon, & Duo
Simon Gorlier (fl. 1550–1584) 4:14

11) Villanesque 1:33
12) Conteclar 1:09
Guillaume Morlaye

13) Au jour au jour au jour 1:24
Laurent Bonard (fl. 1547-1554); guitar arr. by Adrian Le Roy
14) Two Bransles: Bransle gay la centure & Bransle gay 2:22
Adrian Le Roy

15) Dieu inconstant 5:20
Jacques Arcadelt; guitar arr. by Adrian Le Roy
16) Two Bransles 2:45
Guillaume Morlaye

17) Buffons 1:58
18) Conte Clare 1:38
Guillaume Morlaye
19) J’ay le rebours (Pavanne) 4:48
Adrian Le Roy

20) Three Gaillardes 3:24
Guillaume Morlaye


21) Margot labourez les vignes 1:25
Jacques Arcadelt; guitar arr. by Adrian Le Roy
22) Contreclare acorde avallée 2:00
23) La Seraphine acorde avallée 4:06
Guillaume Morlaye


24) Tant que vivray 3:16
Claudin de Sermisy (c. 1490–1562)

Total time: 60:07

Ma Guiterre je te chante: 16th century guitar solos and chansons is the first recording these performers know of its kind: it is entirely devoted to sixteenth-century published French guitar repertoire including both guitar solos and vocal works with guitar accompaniment, performed on the type of guitar that sixteenth-century musicians would have used, now known as the four-course Renaissance guitar. Two other exclusively Renaissance guitar recordings exist, but both of those recordings only feature guitar solos. The published music for Renaissance guitar as a solo instrument and together with voice is rarely performed but significant, and provides insight into sixteenth-century European culture. This project also addresses specific performance practice questions that have been raised in recent years.

Guitar in the sixteenth century French royal court of Henri II was a diminutive, treble instrument with four courses, or sets of double strings. A very specific repertoire for the four-course guitar both as a solo instrument and as accompaniment with voice was published in 1550’s Paris, which reflects a close relationship between European poetry, balladry, dance, and music at that time. Many songs, for instance, were subtitled with the names of popular dance types, and many of the solo guitar works are “intabulations,” or arrangements, of vocal music. Some solos and songs use ground bass (repeating bass line and chord sequence) patterns that were popular throughout Europe. The famous “Conte Claros” ballad, popular throughout the Mediterranean world for centuries, is featured in this recording in several versions as guitar solos with ground bass variations. Guitar solos in this recording also include dances and fantasies.

The songs come from two of Le Roy’s books for voice and guitar: the Second Livre de Guiterre (“containing many chansons in the form of voix de ville”), printed January 5, 1555 (1556 by modern reckoning), which consists of songs by Le Roy; and the Cinquiesme Livre de Guiterre (“containing many chansons in three and four parts, by good and excellent musicians”), printed December 6, 1554, which includes the Arcadelt and Bonard chansons. Voix de ville or “city voices” were songs written for the court and aristocratic circles, though the themes are often rustic (another spelling is “Vau de ville,” the origin of our modern-day word, vaudeville). The pieces found in these books include simple songs, such as “Margot,” and more complex songs with sophisticated texts and ornamented guitar parts such as “J’ay le rebours.” Two songs include dance subtitles in the guitar tablatures (denoted in this program’s titles parenthetically), reminding us of the connection between song and dance for the sixteenth-century French public.

Specific performance practices of the published music for voice and guitar, which include settings of poetry by well-known French poet Mellin de Saint-Gelais (c1490-1558), have been discussed by several writers recently in scholarly literature: does the guitarist actually play all the notes (which double the singer’s melody) as printed, with the singer, or does the guitarist arrange a part without a melody for ensemble and only play what is printed as a solo? Opinions differ, but this recording addresses these questions with a variety of performance practices: some of the guitar accompaniments are arranged by the performer in sixteenth-century accompaniment style without melody, some are performed as originally printed with the melody, and some are performed as solo interludes. This recording provides demonstrations of these performance practice questions: for the first time, the listener gets to hear what has been argued in print.

Jocelyn Nelson


Synopses of texts for songs (full texts and translations available with actual CD only):

Si ce n’est amour qu’est-ce/If it isn’t love, what is it?
What’s this feeling I have? Why is this torment in my heart so pleasing? O delectable pain...

Que te sert amy d’estre ainsi/What does it serve you, friend...?
[A man loves his best friend’s mistress, and complains to him that he mistreats her and takes her for granted.]

Une m’avoit promis/A lady promised me...
[A tirade against deception in love.]

Mes pas semez/ My steps, having traveled long and far...
[A woman wanders far and wide searching for her lover, and expressing her devotion to him.]

Au jour.../In the daytime
In the daytime, a woman was planting cabbages; her lover found her; her husband surprises them: “Who is this man planting with you?” “He does more in one hour than you do in 15 days,” she replies.

Dieu inconstant/Fickle god
[A lover rails against Cupid.]

J’ay le rebours/I have the opposite of what I desire
All my joy has turned into pain: Love has made me miserable.

Margot labourez les vignes
Margot, you work the little vines...

Tant que vivray
As long as I live, I will serve Love, the powerful god, in deeds, words, songs,...

Amy Bartram

About the Performers:

Soprano AMY BARTRAM is a versatile singer based in NYC who has sung music ranging from ancient Greek chant to premieres by emerging composers, jazz, and more. She has performed lead roles in Baroque and contemporary operas, is a frequent soloist in oratorios, and sings with the Clarion Music Society Choir, Musica Sacra, and Vox Vocal Ensemble, in venues ranging from Carnegie Hall to the Guggenheim Museum and the Caramoor Festival. For several years Amy appeared in broadcast concerts with Trinity Choir and REBEL baroque orchestra at Trinity Church, Wall St., performing solos in works by Handel, Mozart, and Purcell; she can be heard as a soloist on the bestselling Naxos CD, Christmas at Trinity. Her 2009 recording of John Stone’s Daybreak in Alabama: A Langston Hughes Song Cycle is available on CD Baby and iTunes. A specialist in early music, Amy has performed more than fifteen programs of lute songs with lutenist Ekko Jennings, and is the founder and artistic director of Machicoti, a medieval ensemble. Visit www.amybartram.com

Early guitarist JOCELYN NELSON earned her D.M.A. in early guitar performance at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2002 with recitals on modern and early guitars. Her M.A. from the University of Denver reflects a dual degree in guitar performance and music history. She also has a B.M. in guitar performance from the University of Denver. Her teachers have included Oscar Ghiglia, Ricardo Iznaola, Ronn McFarlane, Pat O'Brien, Hopkinson Smith, and Charles Wolzien. Dr. Nelson currently teaches music history, lute and guitar literature, Baroque guitar, and music appreciation at East Carolina University's School of Music. In 2007 Dr. Nelson performed in NYC as part of the New York City Early Music Celebration with Chitarrina – an ensemble she co-founded – and in 2009 appeared at a Boston Early Music Fringe Concert with soprano Amy Bartram. She was the editor for three recent Lute Society of America Quarterly issues and interviewed lutenist Paul O’Dette for the same publication. Visit www.ecu.edu/music/directory/nelson.cfm


Reviews


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David Small

great!
haunting and lovely!