Perry Weissman 3 | Squirting Flower

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Perry Weissman 3

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United States - Colorado

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Jazz: Weird Jazz Avant Garde: Structured Improvisation Moods: Type: Instrumental
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Squirting Flower

by Perry Weissman 3

Jazz horns layered on melancholy, looping, instrumental rock.
Genre: Jazz: Weird Jazz
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Alaskan Jihad
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6:13 $0.99
2. Tansy
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12:04 $0.99
3. E.K. Turns 21
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8:55 $0.99
4. Smile, Communard
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10:45 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


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Cadence Magazine (Posted by PW3)


The July issue of Cadence has the following review:
PERRY WEISSMAN,
SQUIRTING FLOWER,
SHRATFIELD 4414.
Alaskan Jihad / Tansy / E.K. Turns 21 / Smile, Communard. 37:48.
Rich Benjamin-Tebelau, tbn; Derek Banach, tpt; Eric
Allen, Brian Murphy, g; Dane Terry, b; Merisa Bissinger,
d. No date or location listed.
As you notice from the personnel listing on SQUIRTING FLOWER the Perry Weissman 3 has six members, none of whom is named Perry Weissman. That clues you in that this is a band that likes to play “offbeat.” Their idea of offbeat is a novel one, guitar-led instrumental rock in the ‘60’s style of groups like the Shadows or Davie Allan and the Arrows supporting Jazzy horns. The two guitarists’ rhythms really carry these live pieces, chugging away repetitively while the horn players bray. However, in extended form like this, you wish the guitarists would stretch a little, but that doesn’t happen and this stuff gets a bit tedious after a while. The closer “Smile, Communard,” is the one track to break away from this pattern. Here, the brass does slowly spread out sounds like an impression of sunrise and the guitars actually get in a little syncopation. Overall you can call this work unique but a little bit of excitement would have been welcome as well.