Richard Ducros | Au Bonheur des Dames

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Jazz: Ragtime Classical: Waltz Moods: Featuring Saxophone
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Au Bonheur des Dames

by Richard Ducros

Original pieces for saxophone and piano by Rudy Wiedoeft and Jean Matitia. Genuine masterpieces selected from Vaudeville music, film music, ragtimes and waltzes composed around 1920.
Genre: Jazz: Ragtime
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Valse Marilyn (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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4:05 $0.99
2. Down Home (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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1:40 $0.99
3. Lightnin' (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:26 $0.99
4. Valse Erica (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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3:02 $0.99
5. Gloria (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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1:51 $0.99
6. Valse Sonia (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:55 $0.99
7. Valse Vanité (feat. Christian Lauba)
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2:48 $0.99
8. Au Bonheur des Dames (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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10:15 $0.99
9. Saxophone Scandals (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:59 $0.99
10. Valse Mazanetta (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:52 $0.99
11. Rubenola (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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3:28 $0.99
12. Valse Lucile (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:52 $0.99
13. Sax-Serene (feat. Sophie Teboul)
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2:44 $0.99
14. Valse des Jouets - La Petite Marchande d'Allumettes (feat. Sophie Teboul & Stéphane Rougier)
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3:06 $0.99
15. Marche des Petits Soldats - La Petite Marchande d'Allumettes (feat. Sophie Teboul & Stéphane Rougier)
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1:54 $0.99
16. Romance - La Petite Marchande d'Allumettes (feat. Sophie Teboul & Stéphane Rougier)
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1:22 $0.99
17. Chanson Triste - La Petite Marchande d'Allumettes (feat. Sophie Teboul & Stéphane Rougier)
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1:07 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Rudy Wiedoeft (1893-1940) was born in Detroit Michigan to a large family of musicians, with whom he began his musical studies, playing in the family orchestra which toured as a professional ensemble. He began as a violinist, but had to switch to the clarinet after an injury to his bowing arm. As a young man, he discovered the saxophone and in 1918, he came to New York in the pit orchestra of the musical "Canary Cottage" where his playing was very favorably recieved by both the public and the critics. At this time, he began the long series of recordings with the Edison company which lead to his world-wide fame. One of these recordings, Sax-o-phobia, written in 1918, became the largest selling solo in the history of the Saxophone.

Most of these recordings were composed of novelty solos which Wiedoeft wrote for himself in the post-ragtime « Tin-Pan Alley » style of the 1920’s (thus named for the sound of all of the badly tuned pianos one heard on this street !). These works, which were designed to display Wiedoeft’s beautiful singing tone, incredible technical brillance and strong musical sense, also frequently use effects such as slap-tonguing, « Laughing » and chock tones, which Wiedoeft uses to underline the humorous elements of the saxophone. These elements have often be derided as evidence of Wiedoeft’s lack of musicianship, probably because of a certain attitude among classical saxophonists to gain « respectability » for their instrument. A closer look will reveal that Wiedoeft’s compositions, in spite of formal convention, are extremely well concieved for the saxophone and full of surprising harmonic freshness. The effects seen in this light are simply embellishments which do not take away from the inherent compositional strength. In my mind, such things as the reference to Mendelssohn in the coda of « Sax-o-doodle » would seem to indicate an extremely knowledgeable musician who was perhaps poking fun at the vocabulary of his own musical idiom. Wiedoeft obviously had a strong sense of humour. Perhaps it might be more interesting to look at these works not in the first degree, but as elaborate musical puns ?



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