Rebecca Cherry & Joyce Cherry | Remembrances

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Classical: Programmatic music Spiritual: Judaica Moods: Type: Compilations
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Remembrances

by Rebecca Cherry & Joyce Cherry

An evocative album of Jewish & Classical meditative Music that will restore your Soul.
Genre: Classical: Programmatic music
Release Date: 

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1. Aprés un Reve, Op. 6, No. 3
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2:33 $0.99
2. Baal Shem: Vidui (Contrition)
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2:58 $0.99
3. Suite for Violin & Orchestra, Op. 10: Adagio
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5:38 $0.99
4. Kol Nidrei, Opus 47
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10:06 $0.99
5. Canzone (Elegy), Op 38a
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4:08 $0.99
6. Hebrew Melody, Opus 33
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5:30 $0.99
7. Vocalise, Op. 34 No. 14
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5:09 $0.99
8. Schindler's List: Theme
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4:26 $0.99
9. Schindler's List: Jewish Town (Krakow Ghetto-Winter '41)
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4:28 $0.99
10. Schindler's List: Remembrances
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5:27 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Apre`s un Reve
Fauré, Gabriel 1845-1924

Fauré’s music has been described as discreet, restrained and subtle. This song, After A Dream, one of three composed in 1865 as Opus 6, has words by the French poet Romain Bussine. The beautifully woven ‘dreamy’ melody with simple chorded accompaniment is elegant and haunting. Translated into English, the lyrics read:

In sleep, enchanted by your image, I dreamed of happiness, a passionate illusion.
Your eyes were so gentle, your voice so pure and rich.
You were radiant like a sky lighted by the dawn.
You called to me and I left the earth to fly with you toward the light.
For us the skies parted their clouds; unknown splendors, glimpses of divine light.
Alas! Alas! Sad awakening from dreams; I call to you, oh night!
Give me back your illusions!
Return! Return in radiance! Return, oh mysterious night!


Vidui (Contrition) from Baal Shem (Three Pictures of Chassidic Life)
Bloch, Ernest 1880-1959

When the Swiss-born Bloch settled in America, he was the first director of the Mannes School of Music in New York City and later became director of the Cleveland Institute of Music in 1920. Baal Shem was composed in 1923. Vidui, which is the first of three movements, is quite introspective, yet emotional. ‘Vidui’ a Hebrew word, is a confessional prayer recited by Jews as part of the Yom Kippur service and also during the last moments of life when the dying person has an opportunity to verbally make peace with a lifetime of accomplishments and shortcomings. In Jewish tradition, it is a ‘mitzvah’ to say this personal final prayer or to recite the traditional text on behalf of one who is too ill to do so. The Vidui acknowledges the imminence of death, recalls a life of both goodness and mistakes, and asks that the good be remembered and the misdeeds forgiven. In some versions there is a request that those left behind be granted protection. Vidui provides a platform from which to say goodbye, ask forgiveness, and ease fears. The words which are recited, whether from the prayer book or from the heart, make death a holy moment


Adagio from Suite for Violin & Orchestra in A minor, opus 10
Sinding, Christian 1856-1941

Norwegian composer Christian Sinding lived much of his life in Oslo after studying composition, violin and piano in Germany. As a student, he was deeply influenced by Liszt and Wagner and continued writing in the Late-Romantic style for his entire career. In Norway, his popularity was second only to Grieg.

The Adagio from his Suite for Violin and Orchestra in A Minor, Opus 10 is deep and serious. The long- phrased main theme, which appears at both the outset and conclusion of the piece, is in A Minor and has a dark, brooding character. However, the sunlight appears very brightly in the middle section of the movement, when the clouds part to a radiant melody in C Major.


Kol Nidrei, opus 47
Bruch, Max 1838-1920

Of all of Bruch’s works, his compositions for solo instrument – either violin, cello, piano or voice - are his most effective and popular. Kol Nidrei, originally created for cello and orchestra, is performed in this recording on the violin. After composing this work, Bruch was often mistaken as a Jew, as it seemed unthinkable in his native Germany that a gentile would create a ‘Jewish’ work. However, Bruch had a deep love and curiosity for folksong, composing Hebrew, Scottish and Welch tunes as well as German ‘Volkslieder’ for men’s chorus.

Legend has it that a Jewish friend invited Bruch to a service on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish calendar also known as the Day of Atonement. Bruch must have been enchanted with the character of the Cantor’s melody. His Kol Nidrei is in two sections. At the outset, the main theme from this Yom Kippur chant, written in D Minor, is proclaimed in several ‘verses’. In the second section, the key changes to D Major and the piano accompaniment becomes arpeggiated as the harp plays an important role in the original orchestral score. The melody changes from the Aramaic chant into an inspirational chorale. Finally, as the musical prayer ends, one has the impression that the sins from the previous year have been forgiven.


Canzone
Barber, Samuel 1910-1981

Samuel Barber’s music is never without soaring lyricism, beautiful craftsmanship and deeply felt emotion. Born in Westchester, Pennsylvania, he excelled in music when he was quite young, entering the Curtis Institute at age 13. He quickly rose to fame, receiving the American Prix de Rome and two successive Pulitzer Prizes in 1935 and 1936.

Barber’s music was popular and performed often during his lifetime by major artists and conductors. His most famous piece, the Adagio for Strings, excerpts of which became famous in the movie ‘Platoon’, has almost overshadowed his other work. The Canzone is actually a transcription for violin and piano, taken from the Second Movement of the Piano Concerto, Opus 38. The mood of the movement begins contemplatively, slowly building in intensity to an emotional climax. In the concluding bars, the music floats effortlessly into the stratosphere.


Hebrew Melody, Opus 33
Achron (Akhron), Joseph (Youssel) 1886-1943

Achron was born in Poland, resided in Germany and Palestine and eventually settled in Hollywood. There he wrote film music and performed as a violinist in recording studios. His teachers included the legendary violinist Leopold Auer and Russian composer Anatoly Liadov. While studying in St. Petersburg in 1911, he joined the relatively new ‘Society for Jewish Folk Music’, a group that eventually numbered over 1,000 Jewish artists. Hebrew Melody was his first composition with a Jewish theme and the piece became an instant hit through performances and recordings by Jascha Heifetz.

When Achron died at age 56, he was described in an obituary by his friend 12-tone composer Arnold Schönberg, as "one of the most underrated modern composers". He left behind a legacy of about 100 compositions which are now housed at the Tel Aviv University in Israel where a Conservatory is named after him.

Hebrew Melody, Opus 33 for violin and orchestra is dedicated to the memory of the composer’s father, a Russian Cantor. It begins with a simple, yet mournful theme as a slow, lilting dance. Each phrase becomes more and more animated, gyrating into a frenetic cadenza, whereupon the exhausted dancer collapses in a heap and slowly drifts away into the heavens.


Vocalise, Opus 34, No. 14
Rachmaninoff, Sergei 1873-1943

The Vocalise comes from a series of 14 songs, Opus 34, written in 1912. By that time, Rachmaninoff had already composed his famous piano concertos and symphonies and was living in Moscow. Unlike most songs, a Vocalise has no text; rather; the notes are formed with vowels, sung in a legato style, strung together like a pearl necklace. This piece works well for all orchestral instruments and is a popular addition to many recitals. Its sound is enriched by the intricate and thickly textured piano accompaniment. The melody line is suave, moving up and down the scale in a very linear way, giving it a vocal feel. The piece is full of subtle expressions and has a calming feeling, leaving one quite content at its conclusion.




1. Theme From “Schindler’s List”
2. Jewish Town (Krakow Ghetto – Winter ’41)
3. Remembrances
Williams, John 1932

American composer John Williams has become one of the most influential musicians of our time. Known mostly for his movie compositions, his themes are probably as recognizeable as those of the greatest of classical composers. The movie ‘Schindler’s List’, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1993, tells the story of a German industrialist in Poland who saved the lives of his Jewish workers during the Second World War. William’s score weaves a touching and sometimes frightening canvas. The three movements presented on this CD were originally performed in the film score by Itzchak Perlman, providing key emotional emphasis for the movie’s storyline.


Apre`s un Reve
Fauré, Gabriel 1845-1924

Fauré’s music has been described as discreet, restrained and subtle. This song, in English titled, After A Dream, is one of three composed in 1865, as Opus 6, The words are written by French poet Romain Bussine. The beautifully woven ‘dreamy’ melody has simple chorded accompaniment, which is elegant and haunting. Translated into English, the lyrics read:

In sleep, enchanted by your image, I dreamed of happiness, a passionate illusion.
Your eyes were so gentle, your voice so pure and rich.
You were radiant like a sky lighted by the dawn.
You called to me and I left the earth to fly with you toward the light.
For us the skies parted their clouds; unknown splendors, glimpses of divine light.
Alas! Alas! Sad awakening from dreams; I call to you, oh night!
Give me back your illusions!
Return! Return in radiance! Return, oh mysterious night!


Vidui (Contrition) from Baal Shem (Three Pictures of Chassidic Life)
Bloch, Ernest 1880-1959

When the Swiss-born Bloch settled in America, he was the first director of the Mannes School of Music in New York City and later became director of the Cleveland Institute of Music in 1920. Baal Shem was composed in 1923 and is written in three movements with distinct and different characters. Vidui, which is the first of three movements, is quite introspective, yet emotional. ‘Vidui’ a Hebrew word, is a confessional prayer recited by Jews as part of the Yom Kippur service. It is also recited during the last moments of life when the dying person has an opportunity to verbally make peace with a lifetime of accomplishments and shortcomings. In Jewish tradition, it is a ‘mitzvah’ to say this personal final prayer or to recite the traditional text on behalf of one who is too ill to do so. The Vidui acknowledges the imminence of death, recalls a life of both goodness and mistakes, and asks that the good be remembered and the misdeeds forgiven. In some versions there is a request that those left behind be granted protection. Vidui provides a platform from which to say goodbye, ask forgiveness, and ease fears. The words that are recited, whether from the prayer book or from the heart, make death a holy moment.


Adagio from Suite for Violin & Orchestra in A minor, opus 10
Sinding, Christian 1856-1941

Norwegian composer Christian Sinding lived much of his life in Oslo after studying composition, violin and piano in Germany. As a student, the composer was deeply influenced by Liszt and Wagner and continued writing in the Late-Romantic style for his entire career. In Norway, his popularity was second only to Grieg.

The Adagio from his Suite for Violin and Orchestra in A Minor, Opus 10, is deep and serious. The long-phrased main theme appears at both the outset and conclusion of the piece, is written in the key of A Minor and has a dark, brooding character. In the middle section of the movement, the sunlight appears and the clouds part to a radiant melody in C Major. With a return to the original theme, the composer elaborates upon its brooding melody, sliding in between the major and minor keys, coming to a beautiful but triumphant end.


Kol Nidrei, opus 47
Bruch, Max 1838-1920

Of all of Bruch’s works, his compositions for solo instrument – violin, cello, piano or voice - are his most effective and popular. Kol Nidrei, was originally written for cello and orchestra. After composing this work, Bruch was often mistaken as a Jew. It was unthinkable in his native Germany that a gentile would create a ‘Jewish’ work. However, Bruch’s deep love and curiosity for folksong, Hebrew, Scottish and Welch, as well as German ‘Volkslieder’ for men’s chorus, gave him the insight and compassion to write this beautiful and spiritually invoking piece of music.

Legend has it that a Jewish friend invited Bruch to a service on Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish calendar, also known as the Day of Atonement. The composer was enchanted with the character of the Cantor’s melody, and used this experience to create his famous work. The music is written in two sections. The main theme of this Yom Kippur chant, in D Minor, is proclaimed in several ‘verses’. In the second section, the key changes to D Major. The accompaniment becomes arpeggiated just like the harp, which plays an important role in the original orchestral score and the melody changes from the Aramaic chant into an inspirational chorale. Finally, the musical prayer ends, and one has the impression that the sins from the previous year have been forgiven.


Canzone
Barber, Samuel 1910-1981

Samuel Barber’s music is never without soaring lyricism, beautiful craftsmanship and deeply felt emotion. Born in Westchester, Pennsylvania, he excelled in music as a young boy, entering the Curtis Institute at age 13. He quickly rose to fame, receiving the American Prix de Rome and two successive Pulitzer Prizes in 1935 and 1936.

Barber’s music was popular and performed often during his lifetime by major artists and conductors. His most famous piece, the Adagio for Strings, excerpts of which became famous from the movie ‘Platoon’, almost overshadowed other famous works of the celebrated composer. The Canzone is actually a transcription for violin and piano, taken from the Second Movement of the Piano Concerto, Opus 38. The mood of the movement begins contemplatively, slowly building in intensity to an emotional climax. In the concluding bars, the music floats effortlessly into the stratosphere leaving the listener in peaceful contemplation.

Hebrew Melody, Opus 33
Achron (Akhron), Joseph (Youssel) 1886-1943

Achron was born in Poland, resided in Germany and Palestine and eventually settled in Hollywood. There he wrote film music and performed as a violinist in recording studios. His teachers included the legendary violinist Leopold Auer and Russian composer Anatoly Liadov. While studying in St. Petersburg in 1911, he joined the relatively new ‘Society for Jewish Folk Music’, a group that eventually numbered over 1,000 Jewish artists. Hebrew Melody was his first composition with a Jewish theme and the piece became an instant hit through performances and recordings by Jascha Heifetz.

Achron died at age 56. His friend, the 12-tone composer Arnold Schönberg, described him in an obituary as "one of the most underrated modern composers". Achron left behind a legacy of approximately 100 compositions that are now housed at the Tel Aviv University in Israel where a Conservatory was named in his honor after his death.

Hebrew Melody, Opus 33 for violin and orchestra is dedicated to the memory of the composer’s father, a Russian Cantor. It begins with a simple, yet mournful theme as a slow, lilting dance. Each phrase becomes more and more animated, gyrating into a frenetic cadenza, whereupon the exhausted dancer collapses in a heap and slowly drifts away into the heavens.

Vocalise, Opus 34, No. 14
Rachmaninoff, Sergei 1873-1943

Vocalise belongs to a series of 14 songs, Opus 34, written in 1912. Rachmaninoff was already living in Moscow at this time of his life and was known for his famous piano concertos and symphonies. Unlike most songs, a Vocalise has no text. The notes are instead formed with vowels, sung in a legato style, strung together like a pearl necklace. This piece works well for all orchestral instruments and is a popular addition to many recitals because of its rich and beautiful melody and is enriched by the intricate and thickly textured piano accompaniment. The melody line is suave, moving up and down the scale in a very linear way adding to the melodious and legato style of the solo voice or instrument. The piece is full of subtle expression, and has a calming feeling of contentment at its conclusion.



1. Theme From “Schindler’s List”
2. Jewish Town (Krakow Ghetto – Winder ’41)
3. Remembrances
Williams, John 1932-

American composer John Williams has become one of the most influential musicians of our time. Known mostly for his movie compositions, his themes are probably as recognizable as those of the greatest of classical composers. The movie ‘Schindler’s List’, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1993, tells the story of a German industrialist in Poland who saved the lives of his Jewish workers during the Second World War. William’s score weaves a touching and sometimes frightening canvas. The playing of Itzchak Perlman, the internationally renowned violinist, provides key emotional emphasis for the movie’s storyline, as he originally performed the three movements presented on this CD in the film score.


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