Rockwila | One in a Million

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United States - Missouri

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Hip-Hop/Rap: Underground Rap Hip-Hop/Rap: Alternative Hip Hop Moods: Type: Lyrical
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One in a Million

by Rockwila

Indie Hip/Hop with Rock influences and live instrumentation.
Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap: Underground Rap
Release Date: 

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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
L7 is a lyrical collection of original Hip-Hop songs with a slight rock influence through the live
instrument sounds in the composition. The singles from L7 were released in October 2012 with the
full EP set to release later in the year. In September 2012, one of the singles titled “Rockstar” won
Hate It or Love It, a segment on the All Out Show on Sirius satellite radio’s Shade45, which
features radio personalities Rude Jude and Lord Sear.
In the interest on being the self-proclaimed voice for the Average Joe, L7 also features “One in a
Million, an edgy anthem that pays homage to being unique and “Geek Squad” a song depicting a
revolution for geeks and nerds alike.


Reviews


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Jason Randall Smith

“One In A Million” isn’t just a song, but a creed to live by.
“One In A Million” isn’t just a song, but a creed to live by, and Rockwila’s out to spread the message far and wide. Over high-powered acidic squiggles that worm their way over bombastic beats and crashing cymbals, he raps about a middle-class upbringing with a father in the home and the pointlessness of trying to be something that he isn’t. As he shouts the chorus with middle fingers extended to the world, electronic horns blare behind him in triumph, slightly medieval in mood, but conveying victory with every note.

-Jason Randall Smith