Sadie Compton | Trouble Come Knockin'

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Bruce Molsky James Bryan Ola Belle Reed

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United States - Tennessee

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Folk: Traditional Folk Country: Bluegrass Moods: Type: Acoustic
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Trouble Come Knockin'

by Sadie Compton

Fiddler Sadie Compton's spirited, earthy, sensuous debut album reveals her unique and enticing blend of Appalachian Old-Time soul and Cajun fire, and also offers a sample of Compton's pure mountain voice; features the exotic Norwegian Hardanger fiddle.
Genre: Folk: Traditional Folk
Release Date: 

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1. Candy Gal
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3:06 $0.99
2. Cruel Willie
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3:46 $0.99
3. The Last of Callahan
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2:52 $0.99
4. Mamie's Waltz
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3:26 $0.99
5. Little Dutch Girl
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3:40 $0.99
6. Screamer
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3:16 $0.99
7. Brother Eli
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2:09 $0.99
8. Tombigbee Waltz
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2:50 $0.99
9. When I Can Read My Titles Clear
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3:01 $0.99
10. Trouble Come Knockin'
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3:07 $0.99
11. Happy One Step
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
CD Info:
Trouble Come Knockin' is a collection of old and new fiddle tunes from the American Southeast, featuring the Norwegian Hardanger fiddle played by Sadie [Compton]. Sadie is joined by top-notch musicians, including Old Time music icons Bruce Molsky and James Bryan; world-renowned mandolinist Mike Compton (of the Nashville Bluegrass Band, and recent O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack fame); Grammy-winning songwriter/musician Candace Randolph; Guitarist Oscar Rice, formerly of Nashville's Goth-Folk trio The Shakers; and guitarist Steve Johnson. Sadie's music is a unique combination of Appalachian soul and Cajun fire, which sings with the unique sparkle that only the beautiful Norwegian hardanger fiddle can impart. Tracks include six traditional fiddle tunes, four originals which reflect Sadie's south-Louisiana upbringing, and one old shape-note hymn learned from the late, great Ola Belle Reed. Sadie brings a fresh new voice to the American Old Time music scene. Produced by The Nashville Bluegrass Band's own Alan O'Bryant.

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"[Sadie] makes truly beautiful fiddle music that is augmented by some of the finest, and most selective, acoustic musicians working today ... The music is delightfully loose and spontaneous, warmed with a spirit of friendship that is audible." (Donald Teplyske/Bluegrass Now Magazine)

"When I Can Read My Titles Clear," is the album's standout track and makes us want to hear more of her oddly mannered voice doing ballads and hymns. Hopefully, we'll be hearing more from Sadie Compton. She's a fine and tasteful musician." (Michael Cala/Sing Out! Magazine)

"fiddle album, filled with good taste and great ideas" (Shin Akimoto/Moonshiner Magazine, Japan)

"...all the musicians seem very capable, and it's easy to listen to. They all appear to be having a good time, which makes a pleasant change, and there's none of the frenetic, million notes a minute, self-indulgence which often plagues this type of recording. In fact it's very cosy, and makes you want to join in, which should be the defining feature of any good session." (Barry Jones/Americana UK Magazine)


Reviews


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Americana UK

"...it’s very cosy, and makes you want to join in"
This collection of American Old Time music is the debut album for Ms. Compton, featuring her Norwegian hardanger fiddle, and a very handsome instrument it looks too. Various fiddles, guitars and banjos are along for the ride, and husband Mike, who played on the “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” soundtrack, plays mandolin and tenor guitar. There is only one vocal track to break up the instrumentals, but all the musicians seem very capable, and it’s easy to listen to. They all appear to be having a good time, which makes a pleasant change, and there’s none of the frenetic, million notes a minute, self-indulgence which often plagues this type of recording. In fact it’s very cosy, and makes you want to join in, which should be the defining feature of any good session. Her website www.fiddola.com has photographs of hirsute people in check shirts and dungarees, and even fiddle-playing in a rocking chair on the back porch, of all things! I did check, but I couldn’t see a spittoon! There is also a photograph of a violin–shaped tattoo, which Sadie displays proudly on her back, and which I’m sure will be de rigeur for all aspiring fiddlers, come next year’s festival season. Not for everybody, but check it out, you may be pleasantly surprised. BJ

Bluegrass Now (Donald Teplyske)

"...truly beautiful fiddle music "
Bluegrass Now Magazine, November 2003:
Sadie Compton is not your typical old-time fiddler. She plays string band style music on a Norwegian hardanger fiddle, a relatively rare and seldom heard instrument even within fiddle circles. Also, she plays with little apparent concern for fitting into the constraints of a genre, flavoring her music with Cajun, bluegrass, and old-time sounds. Finally, Compton thanks her tattoo artist within the liner notes, possibly a first for an old-time musician! I'm not going to pretend I could tell the difference between Norwegian and Appalachian fiddle styles at first listen. However, after listening to Compton's earthy, sensuous debut album, one is cognizant that one is hearing a very special talent, the likes of which are seldom encountered. Compton makes truly beautiful fiddle music that is augmented by some of the finest, and most selective, acoustic musicians working today including Bruce Molsky, James Bryan, Mike Compton, and Candace Randolph. Featuring various alignments, from duos to quintets, the haunting music produced by Compton's fiddle unites the range of sounds contained within several original and traditional numbers. Compton's voice is striking but, unfortunately, only one vocal piece is included; Compton's pure mountain voice brings stark reality to Ola Belle Reed's "When I Can Read My Titles Clear." Produced by Alan O'Bryant, some of this music was captured at a "pickin' party" in Alabama while the remainder was more formally recorded. The music is delightfully loose and spontaneous, warmed with a spirit of friendship that is audible. An inspiration to non-musicians everywhere, Compton didn't pick up the fiddle until age 26. Embracing the enticing exoticness of Trouble Come Knockin' makes one very pleased that she has chosen to pursue her artistic Muse. If one enjoys eclectic music artists such as Red Clay Ramblers, Jody Stecher, and the Reeltime Travelers, Sadie Compton's version of old-time music is sure to be appreciated. (DT)

james

excellent cd - great to relax to - easy to listen to

eli

great ce
this was an awesome cd. i enjoyed the music.

roger rice

outstanding cd
this is what folk, bluegrass is supposed to sound like. the music sounds like its straight from the mountains. keep this music alive.

Winni, Germany

Excellent CD -- a must-have for old-time music lovers!
Trouble Come Knockin'? Well, listening to this fantastic CD certainly makes me forget any trouble I may have! This is really "feel-good music" with awesome sound.

Steve Farling

Excellent New Take on Old Time!
Wonderful CD, my wife and I can't stop listening to it! We are hoping Sadie will come out with another one soon!

dasspunk

Buy This!
Sadie obviously knows how to pick a tune as well as sing one. "...Titles Clear" is downright creepy-good. I can't believe it's not been in a movie soundtrack yet as it paints such a colorful image. It would fit equally well as the backdrop to a beautiful childhood memory montage... or a supper creepy shootout/murder sequence! I also love Candy Gal and Little Dutch Girl.

david

recommended listening
If you like fiddle playing in the "hoedown" or "barn dance" style, you will enjoy Sadie Compton. The fiddle she plays is very unusual, and she plays it with much professionalism.
Feel free to tap your toes, stomp your feet, or start dancing!

joe bob

trouble come knockin'
great new fiddler, i found on myspace, through james and rachel bryan! love this stuff, with a whole bunch of kick ass friends on it to boot! everybody should check her out! can't wait for seconds!!
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