Shaun Kama & The Kings Of The Wild Frontier | Dear Scarecrow

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Rock: Americana Country: Western Moods: Solo Male Artist
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Dear Scarecrow

by Shaun Kama & The Kings Of The Wild Frontier

Alternative country, surf, western, rockabilly, punk, folk, and American rock-n-roll
Genre: Rock: Americana
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Lost Lonely Road
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4:17 $0.99
2. All By Myself
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2:47 $0.99
3. Sunday Morning Coming Down
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2:50 $0.99
4. Searching For Atlantis
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3:18 $0.99
5. Muerte Y El Diablo (Death & the Devil)
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3:17 $0.99
6. Frostbite Heart
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4:08 $0.99
7. This One Ends in a Murder
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3:33 $0.99
8. Woman From Beyond
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3:42 $0.99
9. Your Bastard Son
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3:34 $0.99
10. I'd Be Scared Too
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3:17 $0.99
11. The Strangest Thing
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3:45 $0.99
12. June Gloom
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4:14 $0.99
13. Beware
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1:39 $0.99
14. Ghosts of the Twilight Storm
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
He stands at the end of a long road, littered with things we once held dear, but must leave behind: The myth. For every generation he wears a different face: James Dean, Marlon Brando, James Cagney and Johnny Cash have borne his smile, his patience, his wisdom. Through his songs, his images, his ceremonial rites, we see the permanent strength in ourselves, and something magic is born within. We know what we can bear: The broken heart, the loss, even the joy that vanishes as quickly as it appears. The myth defies time, its ravages and sorrows; and with his model before us, so can we.

Shaun Kama has walked his road. He’s gathered those things: The love letters tied with faded ribbons, the scratched record of a wedding waltz, the photographs of better times. With this new project, Kings of the Wild Frontier, Kama has occupied the place of myth. He’s commanded the ritual alter on which these memories of heartbreak are transformed into melody, song, and the will to carry forth. “I like hearing stories from other people,” Kama says. “Everything, every day, I use to help write. You just don’t know when one of these is going to touch you in a way. Not everything is a golden nugget, but sometimes you pinnacle. I can’t imagine writing some of the stuff I’m writing now even ten years ago, ‘cause I didn’t have the experience, or the emotions. I hadn’t lived through certain things. You’ve gotta live through adversity.”

Kama has this to say about his new music: “I could be 60 or 16, and it wouldn’t matter, as long as the songs are there. It’s about the songs. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for a long time, I’ve been in the industry, and people may or may not know who I am, whatever. This is a whole, big giant new deep ocean for me, with a lot of new experience. I would hate to obscure people’s vision of this new music by saying, this is Shaun Kama, he was in all those bands. I want people to walk into this with an open mind, and if they love the songs, they love it and if they don’t feel it, they don’t feel it.”

Shaun Kama’s Kings of the Wild Frontier summons the primal stuff of Western pop culture: The debut album ‘Dear Scarecrow’ is a Western-y, soundtrack-y, Spaghetti Western, David Lynch, Tarantino, Robert Rodriguez, that kind of feel.. I sometimes describe the music as being a combination of Western surf, Folk and American rock. In the industry, they always want to put some kind of label on it. I had somebody say it’s kind of alternative country, and I suppose that’s true, because when you look at what country music is these days, basically it’s pop songs with mandolins and violins. That’s not roots-y enough for me. It’s not premeditated, but it’s inspired and it’s timely.

When I see a grandmother and grandfather, a 16-year-old kid with a Mohawk, a guy that has a family and works construction, a redneck guy that loves the most bluegrass shit in the world down in Tennessee, all the way to a guy that’s into Cannibal Corpse from San Antonio, Texas, and they all come to me and they say, ‘That song ‘Bastard Son’ touched me. I generally don’t like this kind of music, but there's something that make me want to buy your album.’ When I hear that from that diverse amount of people, it makes me realize that I’m on the right path, I’m doing the right thing, and I’m going to make some music that’s going to live long after I’m dead. I’m trying to set a legacy up.”

When we’re ready, Shaun Kama is waiting for us. His songs resonate with the experience of working people, people who have felt, lived and loved in ways you’ll never see on prime time TV. Songs with heart, made of the stuff of legend. Real Western music.

**Many great musicians who performed on the album include Sam “Sluggo” Phipps (Oingo Boingo) and Angelo Moore (Fishbone) on saxophone, Rob “Blasko” Nicholson (Rob Zombie, Ozzy, The Death Riders)on bass, Marc “Sparky” Demented (Demented Are Go) on vocals, Elvis (Three Bad Jacks)on guitar, Mal Wrekker (The Slanderin’) on upright bass, Marc “The Dark Mime” Diamond (The Dwarves, Mondo Generator)on guitar, and Greg Lesez (Bob Dylan, Van Morrison)on pedal steel.


Reviews


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Boss Anjo

This is a must have for EVERYONE!
I've followed the career of Shaun Kama for quite some time, from the days of "The Living End", Damnation, Blood-Junkies, and now Kings Of The Wild Frontier. I can honestly and safely say this is by far the best work he has produced ever!

Combining rock & roll, rockabilly, surf, folk and country this disk is definitely not something you've heard before, and especially not this well. Kama's voice is reminiscent of that of Chris Issac, and at times even a little Johnny Cash. (Especially in the Cash cover of "Sunday Morning Coming Down" and the Cash sounding 'Your Bastard Son"). If there was a smoke filled bar in the darkest corner of Hell, and Justin Sullivan of New Model Army was fronting Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, THAT would be KOTWF.

An all-star cast of musicians was assembled for this recording, including members of The Dwarves, Fish Bone, Oingo Boingo, & Rob Zombie. However none make quite the impact as bassist Albert Garcia. Though not too loud in the mix, Garcia's bass sets the tone of the record.

This disk gives you a sense of comfort, while keeping you looking over your shoulder, a feeling of acceptance while keeping you alienated. Any emotion you could possibly conjure up, and then contradict is brought out in this disk. This is a must have for EVERYONE!

Boss Anjo

This is a must have for EVERYONE!
I've followed the career of Shaun Kama for quite some time, from the days of "The Living End", Damnation, Blood-Junkies, and now Kings Of The Wild Frontier. I can honestly and safely say this is by far the best work he has produced ever!

Combining rock & roll, rockabilly, surf, folk and country this disk is definitely not something you've heard before, and especially not this well. Kama's voice is reminiscent of that of Chris Issac, and at times even a little Johnny Cash. (Especially in the Cash cover of "Sunday Morning Coming Down" and the Cash sounding 'Your Bastard Son"). If there was a smoke filled bar in the darkest corner of Hell, and Justin Sullivan of New Model Army was fronting Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, THAT would be KOTWF.

An all-star cast of musicians was assembled for this recording, including members of The Dwarves, Fish Bone, Oingo Boingo, & Rob Zombie. However none make quite the impact as bassist Albert Garcia. Though not too loud in the mix, Garcia's bass sets the tone of the record.

This disk gives you a sense of comfort, while keeping you looking over your shoulder, a feeling of acceptance while keeping you alienated. Any emotion you could possibly conjure up, and then contradict is brought out in this disk. This is a must have for EVERYONE!

DropD

Yep this one rips!
I have been enjoying the work of Mr.Kama for many years now, from The Living End,Damnation,Boodjunkies, and now the Kings of the Wild Frontier. This Albun realy shines and brings together a fusion of styles like no other. What else can I say but this one is a real masterpiece will be kept in heavy rotaion for quite some time.

Big Charlie

Shaun's best material to date
How many of you remember Damnation? One of the very few, very elite rock bands of the late 90s who could sell out any local club without the help of a label or high powered promoter. Front man, Shaun Kama was then and is now one of the most charismatic singers that you will every talk to, listen to, or watch. His newest band, Shaun Kama & The Kings Of The Wild Frontier have released his best material to date on Dear Scarecrow. With a sound almost reminiscent of Johnny Cash or some of Mike Ness’ country stuff, Shaun is showcasing some great new tunes with a great new sound. I strongly recommend this to anyone who is into Cash, Ness, Supersuckers, Nick Cave and even The Cramps.

jay

Great CD!!! Highly recommend this one!
Great CD! Listen in my car and at work. Not a bad song on the whole CD, well, except the third one. Highly recommend this CD to my friends.

WildHare

Perfect road-trip album!
I first saw KOTWF at Bar Sinister in Hollywood a year ago, and tracked their MySpace page until the CD came out. I'm glad I did. "Dear Scarecrow" is same bass-driven slick guitar road rock that haunted my memory from that night forward. The album is largely a pulse-pounding blend of Johnny Cash and Nick Cave with just a dash of Brian Setzer rock-a-billy. It's the kind of album best listened to on a midnight drive to Las Vegas cruising dark highways alongside moonlit desert sands, strumming and slapping the steering wheel the whole way. The only track not an instant favorite was "Sunday Mourning Coming Down," whose slower tempo ran counter to what I love about this band. It's a decent song, and perhaps if it were a few tracks further in it might be a more welcome respite from the hard-driving tunes that dominate the disc. The surprisingly catchy and still up-tempo "Searching for Atlantis" is about as pensive as I want to hear Shaun and the Kings get. I ripped "Dear Scarecrow" onto my computer, where I listen to it at home, and have left the CD in my car since I popped in. I imagine I'll be cruising along to it for a long time to come.

Kathlyn

A little bit of this and that
KOTWF rocks my world. Having heard of them through their some-time bassist, SV, Shaun's music has taken me through the past, present and future with the catchy riffs and charismatic, melodic voice. My favorite song, "Lost Lonely Road", echoes the ache that is present in my heart when I am gone from those I love. The songs shine through as a bit of rock, a little country and a lot of soul. This album is a must-have for the discerning listener.