Sugar Blue | Code Blue

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United States - NY - New York City

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Urban/R&B: Rhythm & Blues Urban/R&B: Rhythm & Blues Moods: Mood: Virtuoso
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Code Blue

by Sugar Blue

Explosive Harmonica, soulful melodies & power groove. The return of a true harp hero.
Genre: Urban/R&B: Rhythm & Blues
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Krystalline
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4:13 $0.99
2. Chicago Blues
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5:40 $0.99
3. Bluesman
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4:38 $1.99
4. Walking alone
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4:50 $0.99
5. Cold blooded man
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4:27 $0.99
6. NOLA
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5:48 $0.99
7. Bad boys heaven
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9:08 $0.99
8. Let it go
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3:30 $0.99
9. Shed no tears
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2:56 $0.99
10. I don't know why
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5:44 $0.99
11. High you can't buy
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5:21 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
" powerful and fluent harmonica player who is also an effective and heartfelt singer in addition to being a superior writer of blues-oriented songs..." - BILLBOARD

"...the suave fervor of his siinging is as true as gospel!" – DOWNBEAT

"...each song is an instant classic! - BLUES REVUE


The long awaited new release from Sugar Blue, one of the blues world’s most distinctive and acclaimed harmonica virtuosos!

The new material is phenomenal! Sugar Blue, backed by the talents of Rico McFarland, James Knowles and Jesse Cross laid the new tracks in Sweet Home Chicago. Additional work has been recorded and mixed in Paris and Milan and the result is a very diverse, soulful, mature and powerful work.

Some songs are pure Sugar Blue, harmonica raging like a lion and cutting like a razor! Sensuous sounds and simmering melodies, rock solid rythms to groove you to the bone!
There are chromatic harp solos and stark new concepts that reflect his renewed creative fire and continued commitment to cutting edge creativity. His vocals mellow yet ferocious have grown. His lyrics are profound, introspective and outward looking at the same time.

CODE BLUE brings on the resurgence of one of harmonica's great masters!

CODE BLUE comes from the heart of tradition and the soul of an innovator!!


Reviews


to write a review

Obrad Macej

Male
This is a very nice black harmonic blues...
Im very happy cousa I can listen litle this music from NET albeit not completely songs... This is not good for promotion album one Big Music Man like a this...
Thanks...

kevin conboy

Code Blue
I intially ordered this cd for my brother in law who is from chicago.However some of the samples were so interesting I ordered a copy for myself.Boy am I glad I now have this great cd,I have been listening to all the songs several times and iy has now become one of my favorite cds.Great sound the lyrics are so original what a breath of fresh air.Can't wait till his nextt cd.

Anthony


Hey Sugar Blue we met today 7/2/08 at JFK and I listened to some of your songs like I said I would and you sound really great! You are one cool dude. I really dig your sound. I would like to see you in concert one day. It was a pleasure meeting you and hope you enjoy your trip.

Joe Harewicz

Sugar Blue has mastered the harmonica. Amazing player.
This CD shows how an artist can transend the instrument.
Sugar Blue makes a harmonica play notes that were not yet invented and he plays them with ease and style, packing in so much story telling in each solo.
WOW.

Marty Gunther

Blow, baby, blow!
After two powerful Alligator CDs recorded when he was based in Chicago, Sugar Blue breaks new ground from his new home base in Milan, Italy. While he's still ripping off notes with the strength of a category-five hurricane and playing scales that most traditional harmonica players can't even dream about, the artist shows far more sensitivity and maturity on this disc. And the confidence and victory he's achieved over his inner demons are clearly evident in his strong, clear vocals that only enhance his legendary playing.

The CD begins with Krystalline, a soulful, upbeat ode to beating an evil mistress, better known as cocaine. It's a deeply powerful, bittersweet love song with a happy ending.

The ghosts of a legion of blues musicians get to prowl the earth again in Chicago Blues. Although an accomplished musician by the time he got to the Windy City in the late '70s, Blue buried himself in the Northside blues scene and was influenced by dozens of Chicago's finest, many of whom have crossed over to a better world. From Sunnyland Slim to Lefty Dizz and dozens more, Blue gives them all their due.

The rest of the CD is a winner too, with strong statements why Blue is a Bluesman, as well as tender tears for New Orleans after Wilma and a plea for the world to end the slaughter in Darfur.

Other tunes feature thoughts on broken love, solitude and eternal romance, all presented with a cast of excellent musicians from both sides of the Atlantic, featuring Chicagoans Rico MacFarlane on guitar and Barrelhouse Chuck on piano. Be aware, however, that Blue does not stick to the traditional 12-bar Chicago blues in all the tunes. Open your ears and you'll hear a strong European blues/jazz influence, too.

Do yourself a favor. Pick this one up. You'll enjoy it.

Sandra Kring

Code Blue!
In a age when musicians are packaged and delivered like fast-food products, Sugar Blue transcends the mediocrity of today’s music, reminding us that there is no satisfying substitute for cultivated talent.

As was true with his first two albums, Blue Blazes and In Your Eyes, Sugar Blue’s harp is the true “lead vocalist” in Code Blue. Soulful, sexy, and refined, his harp wails to perfection. Still, this CD offers more than powerful, honeyed vocals, a perfect mix of stellar musicians, and the awe-inspiring harp sounds you’ve come to expect from Sugar Blue. It also delivers a fascinating revelation of the heart and the life of the man who makes that harp sing.

Sugar Blue opens this musical autobiography of the soul with Krystalline, a song whose beat is as seductive as the cocaine that almost destroyed him, then follows it up with two songs that celebrate the music that impassions him: Chicago Blues, a tune that honors bluesmen past, and Bluesman, the energy-charged song that celebrates without apology who Sugar Blue is today. The angst of his social conscience is laid bare in heavy-hitting songs like Nola and Let it Go, and his loves and losses play themselves out in the swanky I Don’t Know Why, the mournful Walking Alone, and the kickin’ Shed No Tears. His self-exploration is expressed in I Don’t Know Why, and his playful nature exposes itself in the silken sound and fun lyrics of Bad Boy’s Heaven. Put these songs together, and you’ve got an album made of grit and silk that kicks contemporary blues up a notch and affirms what is true—The Rolling Stone’s loss, is our gain!

Sandra Kring

Code Blue!!!
In a age when musicians are packaged and delivered like fast-food products, Sugar Blue transcends the mediocrity of today’s music, reminding us that there is no satisfying substitute for cultivated talent.

As was true with his first two albums, Blue Blazes and In Your Eyes, Sugar Blue’s harp is the true “lead vocalist” in Code Blue. Soulful, sexy, and refined, his harp wails to perfection. Still, this CD offers more than Sugar Blue's powerful honeyed vocals, a perfect mix of stellar musicians, and the awe-inspiring harp sounds you’ve come to expect from Sugar Blue. It also delivers a fascinating revelation of the heart and the life of the man who makes that harp sing.

Sugar Blue opens this musical autobiography of the soul with Krystalline, a song whose beat is as seductive as the cocaine that almost destroyed him, then follows it up with two songs that celebrate the music that impassions him: Chicago Blues, a tune that honors bluesmen past, and Bluesman, the energy-charged song that celebrates without apology who Sugar Blue is today. The angst of his social conscience is laid bare in heavy-hitting songs like Nola and Let it Go, and his loves and losses play themselves out in the swanky I Don’t Know Why, the mournful Walking Alone, and the kickin’ Shed No Tears. His self-exploration is expressed in I Don’t Know Why, and his playful nature exposes itself in the silken sound and fun lyrics of Bad Boy’s Heaven. Put these songs together, and you’ve got an album made of grit and silk that kicks contemporary blues up a notch and affirms what is true—The Rolling Stone’s loss, is our gain!

debra


SUGAR, I was very fortuniate to see your grand performance at LA With Linda Marie WOW great job and your as good as it gets! DEBRA

Simon Rugely

Code Blue
I am writing this as Sugar was instrumental in getting me gigs in Paris, France when I sang in a duo Simon & Cyril. I last saw Sugar in Atlanta, some 12 years ago, and I love and miss him. He taught me lots about not being afraid to do what I do. We played our last gig together at La Defense in Paris. Sugar you're wonderful, God Bless and Keep you, and take care of yourself...your talent is God given, and can't be, it cannot be REPLACED!!! Simon

Ted Burke

Sugar Blue Blows them all away!!
I've been playing blues harmonica for almost forty years, and the long and short of the that statement is that I'm not easily impressed with blues harpists who come along late in the day. Sugar Blue, though, is someone I take my hat off to; best known to the general rock and roll audience as the harmonica player on the Rolling Stones' Some Girls album (that's his sweet, Paul Butterfield-like solo on the signature "Miss You" track), I've seen him a couple of times when he and his band happened through Southern California on tour, and after both concerts I didn't touch my harps for a week, after which I picked them up again and commenced to practice more than I had in years. The man is restores the legitimacy of technique and speed to the blues harmonica, traits that had been sullied by John Popper, a muddy, imprecise musician whose harmonica improvisations resemble so much audio mud.Sour-note central. Sugar is fast and crystal clear and very clean in his attack; he's been criticized, in fact, for being "too clean". As it goes, there isn't a blues harp player alive who has better execution than Sugar Blue. The added plus with Sugar's playing, rare among those players who play fast and long--are you listening Jason Ricci?--is that his solos make melodic sense. The man can build a solo. It's not that I'm into speed and technique for their own sake, but I do admire Sugar Blue's ability to have these aspects serve real musical ideas. The new album Code Blue, is a whirlwind of the blues harp applied to a broad array of approaches, including traditional blues motifs, Rolling Stones' style guitar rock, Mahavishnu/Dixie Dregs fusion. His solos are sleek, cutting, rapid in the musical ideas coming from the band leader. Bear in mind that a little of Blue's singing goes a long way--he is like that guy in the chorus who steps out for a solo, singing at the top of his range, slipping off key too often. That, combined with some lyrics that tend to be preachy and the lead-footedly philosophical, can make the vocalizing a bit agonizing. It does give one an embarrassing flashback, as the more Sugar stretches his vocal chords in what he assumes is maestro's knack for rhythm and blues melisma reminds me of those times , in the seventies in bands that were rally drinking associations when I was in front of the microphone, screaming and grunting and bellowing in the mistaken and drunken illusion that I sounded like a hybrid of Jack Bruce, Otis Redding and Gene Pitney. Sure enough, when tapes were played back from the frat parties and keggers we played in around the dock pilings of San Diego's beach areas, I was shamefaced and humbled. At best I sounded as if I had a sock crammed down my gullet, my mouth sealed with duct tape, trying to scream because a crazed Lobo fan threatened me with a reconditioned Trojan while I struggled against an ugly metal chair I was tied to. It was not pretty, not hardly. The best of it all was that no one was killed during my performances, and that I had fun. Or so I was told but witnesses who were not as deep in the back as I had been.Still, for Sugar Blue's part, the harmonica work is about the best one can come across, and the band is simply crack jack, nimble, sharp as a drawer full of razors
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