Thomas Simon | Monção

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
All India Radio Codona Dead Can Dance

More Artists From
United States - New York

Other Genres You Will Love
Avant Garde: Free Improvisation New Age: Techno-Tribal Moods: Type: Experimental
There are no items in your wishlist.

Monção

by Thomas Simon

Sonically, it all comes together in an unusual mix of Dead Can Dance tribalism..." -Sound Monitor, Australia
Genre: Avant Garde: Free Improvisation
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Monção
Share this song!
X
18:32 $0.99
2. In the Middle of Nowhere
Share this song!
X
16:23 $0.99
3. Nightrun
Share this song!
X
5:56 $0.99
4. Up Against the Wall
Share this song!
X
15:53 $0.99
5. Altered Planet
Share this song!
X
12:52 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"Monção" made number 15 on Lucid Culture's 'Best 100 Albums of 2010'.
come out to the Gershwin Hotel, NYC, on 1/13/11 and experience it performed live.
peace,
T
Lucid Culture: http://lucidculture.wordpress.com/2010/12/27/the-100-best-albums-of-2010/

http://www.endorphinrecords.com/

endorphin 012
Hypnotic, Atmospheric, Experimental

featuring:
Thomas Simon on guitar, synth, sampling and vocals
Dave Eggar on Cello
Alex Alexander on electric djembe, drums and sampling
samples of JIllie Simon, vocals on 'Nightrun'

Album Review:
Haunting and hypnotic, Thomas Simon’s new album is a suite of eerie, mostly instrumental soundscapes evoking both Syd Barrett and David Gilmour-era Pink Floyd as well as Bauhaus and, when the ghostly melody begins to take a recognizable shape, Australian psychedelic legends the Church. Incorporating elements of minimalism, sci-fi and horror film scores as well as goth music and oldschool art-rock, it’s an ominous treat for the ears. Over a murky wash of drones, Thomas’ guitar rings, clangs and occasionally roars, moving in and through and then out of a swirling sonic whirlpool, frequently churning with both live and looped percussion. The reliably brilliant Dave Eggar adds layers of cello in the same vein: a flourish here and there and tantalizing snatches of melody that inevitably give way to dark atmospherics.

The title track is much like what Pink Floyd was going for on One of These Days – a staggered, swaying drumbeat, a series of low drones swooping and out of the mix and a forest of minimalist reverb guitar accents. Simon will pull off a hammer-on quickly, or add a silvery flash of vibrato a la David Gilmour – and then send the lick whirling over and over again into the abyss. The second movement, In the Middle of Nowhere, sets a distantly nightmarish scene – a tritone echoes in the background, fading up and back down as the guitar moves ominously and modally around the tonic – and then the cello leads the drums in, and the headless horsemen are off with a gallop. They bring it down to that macabre tritone hook, then bring it up, then back down again for over fifteen minutes.

The third movement works a simple descending hook over a trip-hop loop, sparse piano over washes of guitar noise. Up Against the Wall is a maze of backward masking and disembodied textures, sort of a synthesis of tracks one and three. They take it down and then out with stately yet raw guitar. The closest thing to a coherent song here, Altered Planet evokes the Church with its washes of cello and guitar: “Where we going, we need somewhere to hide” becomes “Where are you going, there’s nowhere to hide,” sirens appearing and then fading out before the guitar finally takes it up in a blaze of distortion. Somewhere there is an epic, dystopic film that needs this for its score. Maybe it hasn’t been made yet. Simon’s sonic palette is actually far more diverse than this album might indicate – his live shows can be very lively. Thomas Simon plays Small Beast upstairs at the Delancey on June 14 at around 9.

Lucid Culture, NYC; May 27th, 2010
http://lucidculture.wordpress.com/2010/05/27/cd-review-thomas-simon-moncao/


Reviews


to write a review