Vincent Poag | Circling Back

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Rock: Americana Rock: Folk Rock Moods: Type: Lyrical
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Circling Back

by Vincent Poag

Poag’s musical strength lies in his ability to tell a story or describe a feeling that compels you to listen to his lyrics but it’s his melody that transports you and draws you in. Poag moves easily from reggae to blues, jazz to rock. He never repeats and always surprises.
Genre: Rock: Americana
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1. Confidence Thrill
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2:21 $0.99
2. Let Me In
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2:29 $0.99
3. Eat My Shorts
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2:36 $0.99
4. Fence Around Your Mind
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2:38 $0.99
5. Seagull
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2:34 $0.99
6. This Christmas
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1:54 $0.99
7. Mountain Lion
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2:43 $0.99
8. Stress
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3:06 $0.99
9. Lawless Lady (feat. Diana Hope)
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3:36 $0.99
10. What's the Matter With You
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2:05 $0.99
11. Little One
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12. I'll Be Seeing You Soon
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The thoughts and dreams of an 8-year-old mind are strong enough to last a lifetime.

Vincent Poag was born and raised in a blue-collar section of Massapequa, Long Island. Born in the 50’s, he was exposed to, and a product of, the Broadway musical era; the music of Gershwin, Porter and Rogers and Hammerstein. As a teen, Poag saw singers like Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley give way to a unique new breed of musician – the singer/songwriter. Influenced by the explosive cultural shift of the 60’s, led by such icons as Bob Dylan and the Beatles, Vincent Poag began his musical journey.

Poag worked in the family’s hardware store from the age of eight and shortly thereafter received his first guitar. He immediately started playing and writing his own music and by the time he entered college he had formed a 3 piece acoustic trio.

Poag with his trio moved to Georgia after college to pursue a career as a singer/songwriter in Atlanta’s burgeoning underground club scene. When that didn’t work out, broke, Vincent returned to New York to drive a bus, play bars and peddle his songs to publishers and record labels. Unfortunately the pressures of making a living forced him to channel his creativity and drive into business ventures, eventually building a successful non-music business.

He later married and had a family but the songwriter in him never died. From time to time he would write a lyric or a song on a subject that resonated with him, only to be tucked away in a desk drawer.

Fast forward to 2008… on a lark as a birthday gift his wife bought him a series of guitar lessons. Now Poag, more settled in his career and family, could revisit his first love and explore his musical potential. The dream that so long ago was put on hold, and the songs that had been tucked away in a drawer were revitalized. Somewhere between hope and possibility in a voice somewhere between Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, and Randy Newman, Vincent Poag was reborn.

The dreams that were put on hold have become material that demands to be heard.

Poag’s musical strength lies in his ability to tell a story or describe a feeling that compels you to listen to his lyrics but it’s his melody that transports you and draws you in. Poag moves easily from reggae to blues, jazz to rock. He never repeats and always surprises.

“This Christmas” was Vincent Poag’s first single off his new CD Circling Back -- a perfect amalgam of his incredible range with a simple message of hope and friendship. Peaking at #34 on the FMQB ACQB Chart, this is a holiday song that is both timely and timeless.


Reviews


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Niek

A must have!!
I really dig this album, found a interesting review of the album. It is from Examiner.com:
It may be Poag's first album, but Circling Back makes a strong case for the notion that maybe it should be mandatory for all musicians to go out and experience another slice of life before coming back to observe it in song. It's a strong, self-assured debut that displays an enormous grasp of the craft and history of songwriting that is well outside the range of most singer/songwriters, equally informed by rock, folk, jazz, standards and maybe even a bit of country.

Poag is a musical Everyman, inhabiting each song and imbuing each one with just enough of a different slant to keep the album fresh, but with enough of a producer's sense to tie all of the songs together in one consistent collection.

Music Lover

Bob Dylan meets Mark Knopfler!
I just found this album from a great review on I Like Jazz and it is really fantastic. I think the review says it all: 'He sings something like Bob Dylan, plays guitar something like Mark Knopfler, but doesn't fall into easy mimicry of either. Credit a long journey to get here, as Vincent Poag took some time away from his dream of becoming a singer-songwriter for the straight life and starting a family. Now older, wiser and possessing a complexity often lacking in such things, Poag has completed a long-awaited recording in Circling Back (Danal) that seeks to frame up his own life lessons. The music mirrors that depth, moving beyond the expected coffee-house acoustics to include orchestral flourishes from the cello, violin and French horn…'

Rick Goyen

A MUST have!
I found this review on Hollywood Today, check it out!!
With a voice somewhere between Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits, and his singular compositional flair, Poag’s 12 well-crafted songs span the vagaries, the haunts, the promises and the lessons of life itself. Poag’s musical strength lies in his ability to tell a story or describe a feeling that compels you to listen to his lyrics but it’s his melody that transports you and draws you in. Poag moves easily from reggae to blues, jazz to rock. He never repeats and always surprises.

itay Shahar

GREAT Album!
Found this review on Jazz Weekly... Check it out==> Vincent Poag has a voice that’s sort of a mix between early Bob Dylan and Jim Croce; gravelly and smoky, but musical enough to keep your attention. He’s also got a gift with the pen that mixes the sardonic humor of a Randy Newman with the vulnerability of a Cat Stevens.

All About Jazz

Folk with depth
He sings something like Bob Dylan, plays guitar something like Mark Knopfler, but doesn't fall into easy mimicry of either. Credit a long journey to get here, as Vincent Poag took some time away from his dream of becoming a singer-songwriter for the straight life and starting a family.

Now older, wiser and possessing a complexity often lacking in such things, Poag has completed a long-awaited recording in Circling Back (Danal) that seeks to frame up his own life lessons. The music mirrors that depth, moving beyond the expected coffee-house acoustics to include orchestral flourishes from the cello, violin and French horn.

Along the way, this New York-based folkie digs deep into the quiet, lasting worries of growing up, of growing old, of trying to make it. “Fence Around Your Mind" laments the way experience can turn against us, smoothing the path toward complacency. “Lawless Lady," with a guest vocal by Diana Hope, explores the ugly circumstances that can turn us toward bad choices. “I'll Be Seeing You Soon," this album's most overt rocker, seems to find Poag spent from the effort, as he laments the “bullsh-t flyin' everywhere."

Yet Poag—who boasts a voice that bears the deep emotional scars of Tom Waits, and the half-lit urgency of Leonard Cohen—is perhaps most memorable, really, when he lets loose this biting, Randy Newman-esque humor on fun asides like “Eat My Shorts" or “What's the Matter with You." Then there's “Stress," with its twinkling island rhythm and what-me-worry? delivery.

Just when Poag threatens to get too far down one of existence's dimly lit alleys, he'll pause for a boozy celebration of life like “Little One," aware as always of the dangers—but certain, even now it seems, that things can work out: “Persevere with a dream," Poag sings, “for a dream to come through."

This album is as good a proof as any that they do just that.