Betty Blanchard | World War II Songs You Never Heard

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World War II Songs You Never Heard

by Betty Blanchard

Three original 1940's wartime songs never released until now (2010)! Recorded in cabaret style, these songs tell a story of the end of WWII and the return of the victorious GI's.
Genre: Pop: 50's Pop
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Tracks

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1. You're My Atomic Bomb
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3:10 $0.99
2. That's My G I
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1:40 $0.99
3. We Haven't Got A Home To Our Name
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2:25 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"The Wartime Songs of Betty Blanchard"

Betty Blanchard (Elizabeth Blanchard Salisbury) was a “real housewife” of suburban Maplewood, New Jersey during World War II. After dabbling in poetry for several years, she moved on to songwriting, inspired by the events surrounding the end of that all-engulfing war. Working with Radio City Music Academy, Musicbox Melodies and Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), she completed three timely songs in 1945-1946, and Jimmy Rogers composed the melodies for all of them. All were in various stages of being (not quite) published at that time, but only now, some 60-plus years later, have they been brought to life beyond the limits of the printed sheet music page.

The three songs on this mini-album tell a progressive story. It was the A-Bomb (“You’re My Atomic Bomb”) that brought an end to the war. And with the war over, millions of soldiers began returning home and transitioning back to civilian life (“That’s My G.I.”), sporting a lapel pin (fondly called the “ruptured duck”) that celebrated their status as veterans. As those millions of returning G.I.’s rejoined their families or started new ones after marrying the girl-they-left-behind, it quickly gave rise to a major nationwide housing shortage (“We Haven’t Got a Home to Our Name”).

The vocals on these three songs reflect the true sounds of the 40’s, as do the caberet style instrumental tracks. Alan Salisbury, Betty’s son, served as executive producer to make it all happen. We hope you enjoy the results of this labor of love.

TRACKS
1. You’re My Atomic Bomb Blanchard & Rogers
2. That’s My G.I. Blanchard & Rogers
3. We Haven’t Got a Home to Our Name Blanchard & Rogers

Copyright 2010 Alan B. Salisbury All rights reserved info@opusonestudios.com


Reviews


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Diane and the RadioIndy.com Reviewer Team

Marvelous Wartime songs of the 1940's
Take a marvelous journey to the era of the 1940’s with Betty Blanchard and her mini CD, “World War II Songs You Never Heard.” This trio of songs were written by Blanchard some sixty plus years ago but have just recently been released. The vocals on this album are rich and textured as they blend superbly over the sweet, jazz like instruments. The song, “You’re My Atomic Bomb” is a nostalgic throwback to a time when the war was finally over and soldiers were coming home. Reminisce of the Andrew Sisters style, “That’s My G I,” highlights multi- part harmonies that easily swirl around the upbeat and vibrant tempo. “We Haven’t Got A Home To Our Name” is true cabaret style as the melodic melody swings with style and grace. The CD, “World War II Songs You Never Heard,” reveals memorable music of the 1940’s and one you will surely enjoy.