Mariachi Champaña Nevin | Classic - Mariachi - Live!

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Classic - Mariachi - Live!

by Mariachi Champaña Nevin

One of the leading mariachis in the world performing traditional mariachi songs and some amazing versions of classical music live with full symphony orchestra.
Genre: Latin: Mariachi
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1. La Fuerza del Mariachi (A Mexican Overture)
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7:01 $0.99
2. Pelea de Gallos
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3:09 $0.99
3. Los Laureles
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2:23 $0.99
4. Guadalajara
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3:06 $0.99
5. Que Bonita Es Mi Tierra
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3:34 $0.99
6. Czardas
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4:08 $0.99
7. Te Quiero Dijiste
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4:10 $0.99
8. La Malagueña
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4:42 $0.99
9. Ella
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3:35 $0.99
10. Gymnopedie #1 - Amor Eterno
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5:58 $0.99
11. Cucurrucucú Paloma
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4:52 $0.99
12. Cielito Lindo Huasteco
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4:42 $0.99
13. Winter III
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3:32 $0.99
14. El Gustito
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2:14 $0.99
15. Granada
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5:20 $0.99
16. O Sole Mio
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3:38 $0.99
17. La Negra
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Mariachi Champaña Nevín
Mariachi Champaña Nevín is making a name for itself as a virtuoso ensemble of uncompromising quality with a multicultural aesthetic unique in the world of music. Led by accomplished classical and mariachi trumpeter, composer, professor and author Jeff Nevin, Ph.D., this ensemble’s performances, recordings and workshops have thrilled and inspired mariachi and Classical-music enthusiasts alike. Turning effortlessly from classic, very traditional Mexican standards to transcriptions of beloved works from Classical music literature, their skill and authenticity within both of these traditions is a thrill to behold.

With the creation of Symphonic Mariachi Champaña Nevín, Jeff Nevin has augmented the mariachi’s string section, creating a lush sound that truly delights and amazes. This is a unique ensemble of the finest “born and bred” mariachi musicians together with world-class classical musicians, combined to create a sound and spirit unlike any other. The only mariachi in the world of it’s kind, Symphonic Mariachi Champaña Nevín boasts current or former members of mariachis Vargas de Tecalitlán, Sol de México, Los Camperos and others along with current or former principal strings and trumpets from orchestras such as the San Diego Symphony, Orquesta Filharmónica de la Ciudad de México, Orqesta de Baja California and many others.

Jeff Nevin and Mariachi Champaña Nevín have appeared on television in at least 7 countries, their recordings are programmed on the DMX Satellite Radio network that reaches 80 million daily listeners, they are featured in the recent documentary film “Viva el Mariachi”, they recorded the theme song to the Televisa TV program “Viva California, Viva Mexico” which airs 12 times per week, and they have become frequent guests of KPBS radio and television in San Diego both performing live in studio and conducting interviews discussing various issues related to their work.

As soloists with major symphony orchestras, in recital performances, educational performances, on recordings or while conducting student workshops, Mariachi Champaña Nevín never fails to enthrall and inspire! Visit VirtuosoMariachi.com to learn more.

Jeff Nevin, Ph.D.
Jeff Nevin, Ph.D., is an award winning classical composer whose works have been performed by the San Diego Symphony, the La Jolla Symphony, the California EAR Unit, the Peninsula Symphony, Mariachi Sol de México, the Sol de México Symphony Orchestra, and many other ensembles. Also a skilled performer, he is the founder and Artistic Director of Mariachi Champaña Nevín, principle trumpet in the La Jolla Symphony, a frequent substitute with the San Diego Symphony, and has performed with artists including Placido Domingo, Charlotte Church, Kenny Loggins, The Moody Blues, Garison Keilor and Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán. Dr. Nevin’s theater credits include Music Director for the world college premier of “Mariachi Quixote”, the first musical with a full mariachi-music score, and Music Director for the La Jolla Playhouse Spanish and English productions of Lorca’s “Blood Wedding”.

Dr. Nevin received his Bachelor of Music degree in music theory and composition from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1990, his Master of Music degree in music theory and composition from Arizona State University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in music theory and composition from the University of California at San Diego in 1998. Dr. Nevin is currently Professor of Music and Director of Mariachi Activities at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, CA, where he has devised and is now offering the world’s first college degree in Mariachi Music. He was a featured presenter giving a lecture/demonstration on mariachi trumpet techniques at the International Trumpet Guild’s 2004 convention and he has given lectures to music educators across the country on the subject of incorporating mariachi music into public school curricula. Dr. Nevin’s first book, Virtuoso Mariachi (University Press of America, 2002), was called “A major milestone in the history of mariachi music” by the Tucson Citizen newspaper, and he is currently writing a full line of method books that will allow mariachi music to be easily inserted into “traditional” music programs anywhere. He is the Artistic Director of the Mariachi Scholarship Foundation, founding member of the National Mariachi Education Association and organized their first Mariachi Institute in June, 2004, which brought together leading mariachi educators and performers from across the country to advance mariachi education.

Florencia Tinoco Barone
Florencia Tinoco has thrilled audiences worldwide with her beautifully expressive soprano voice. A native of Mexico but classically trained in Europe, Mexico & United States. Her vast repertoire has kept her busy singing major roles like Puccini’s La boheme, Gianni Schicchi Bizet’s Carmen, Mozart’s Magic Flute, Requiem to Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana. But perhaps what she is becoming best know for, is her unique style of combining Opera Highlights with the colorful sound of a Mariachi Ensamble. AWARDS: 2007 Presea "Ave de Plata" by the Jalisco State Goverment. 2006 Premio "Bell Canto" by the Pedro Sarquis Foundation. 2004 "First Place" At the California Vocal International Competition. DVD / CD RECORDINGS: "Verdi's Requiem" with Orquesta Filarmonica de Bogota and Coro de la Opera Nacional (Colombia). "Carmina Burana" with Orquesta Filarmonica de Jalisco y Coro del Estado. (Mexico). CD RECRODINGS: Orquesta de Baja California, Mariachi Champaña Nevin, Mariachi Sol de Mexico.

Matthew Garbutt
Matthew Garbutt has earned critical acclaim in the United States, Canada and the Far East for his innovative programming and artistry on the podium. Considered a versatile and exciting conductor, Garbutt has been hailed by audiences and critics alike. Each season he maintains a busy schedule of performiances , conducting a wide range of music, from symphonies and symphonic pops to educational concerts. Garbutt has been the staff conductor and resident pops conductor of San Diego Symphony, interim music director of the San Diego Youth Symphony and conductor for the Kids Artz Festival. He has conducted such artists as Andrea Cardenes, Leonard Pennario, Gustavo Romero, Zina Schiff, and the Partore Brothers. He has also conducted numerous Pop artists including the Canadian Brass, Doc Severinsen, the Dukes of Dixieland, Judy Collins, Vicki Carr, the Swingle Singers, and Captain Kangaroo.

Born in Los Angeles, Garbutt began his musical studies on the tuba at age 10 and conducting at age 16. He attended the Idyllwild School of Music and Arts, the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, California State University Northridge and the California Institute of the Arts. He also attended the Academy for Music an dDramatic Arts in Vienna and completed studies at Indiana University. His mentors include Lawrence Christiansen, Daniel Lewis, Peter Eros, Karl Ostericher and Maurice Abravanel.


1. La Fuerza del Mariachi (A Mexican Overture) (7:02) • Jeff Nevin (2003)
Conducted by Jeff Nevin

Jeff Nevin intended to compose La Fuerza del Mariachi for the San Diego Symphony to perform as an overture to a series of concerts featuring the composer’s ensemble Mariachi Champaña Nevín as soloists on February 27 and 28, 2004. However, when fate intervened and Nevin was invited to conduct the La Jolla Symphony on a series of concerts featuring Latin music, the world premiere (as well as the deadline for completion!) were moved up several months.

The piece, as Nevin describes it, has “several contrasting melodies (original ones), some very literally representing mariachi sounds and rhythms and others more abstractly evoking mariachi ‘moods,’ all strung together in more-or-less common ‘overture’ fashion–in other words, heavy on melody and contrast, light on development!” As a composer trained more in the American avant-garde than in the production of rousing (and tonal!) “curtain-raisers” (Nevin received his Ph.D. in music composition from UCSD after studies with such “cutting-edge” composers as Brian Ferneyhough, Chinary Ung and Roger Reynolds), this emphasis on melody over development is a new turn for his composition. But if the turn led him down a new path conceptually, the neighborhood was nevertheless one where he felt quite comfortable, as Nevin has been performing, teaching, studying, and writing for and about mariachi for years.

Following the dramatic and mysterious introduction (marked Con fuego, or “with fire”) that draws the audience into the rhythmic world of the piece, the strings play a bright and florid melody based on the jarocho style of music and dance from Mexico’s Eastern coast (marked Alegre, or “cheerful”). This expands to a full orchestral tutti as the music transitions to a melody based on the son jalisciensce, one of mariachi’s oldest and most traditional dance forms. The music evolves again, becoming much more intimate as the woodwinds (accompanied by harp, marimba and pizzicato strings) play a quiet, surreal melody harmonized with the familiar parallel thirds of mariachi–a section marked Con amores a tu lado or “with loves at your side.” Clearly, here Nevin intends to “suggest” mariachi moods, sonorities and themes of love rather than literally imitate music that mariachis play.

Another son jalisciensce melody erupts out of the peacefulness of this surreality, but then the melody seems to fade away as the listener is left for a moment to focus on the rhythmic texture underlying this music, before a new, more expansive joropo melody enters and layers upon itself almost in fugue fashion as the music builds to a brilliant, if unexpected, finale.

FIESTA MEXICANA
“Mariachis do everything with a little more gusto, con mas ganas, a little more energy than ‘normal’ people… if you’ve ever known a mariachi you know what I mean! One of the things that made me fall in love with mariachi music is that, for so much of it, the sound, the spirit of the music is so captivating that, even if you don’t understand the words you will not be lacking anything in the experience.” – Jeff Nevin, remarks to audience

2. Pelea de Gallos (3:10) • Juan Garrido
Oscar Amezcua, Antonio Franco, Pablo Díaz, Guadalupe Gonzalez, solo voices
This is one of the most energetic and exciting mariachi songs I know, but it was several years after I began playing it that I realized that the “Pelea de Gallos” really was about a cockfight! I almost stopped playing it until I realized that anyone who understands the words would probably understand the place of this centuries-old tradition (like the bullfight) in Latin cultures, and if you are one who (like myself) is inclined to be against this sort of activity, you probably won’t understand the words! Enjoy the music!

3. Los Laureles (2:24) • José Lopez
Guadalupe Gonzalez, solo vioce
This song is a perfect example of the mariachi mindset. The opening line of this song means “My, what green oleanders”, but when a mariachi sings this seemingly banal line there can be no question about the passion in his heart.

4. Guadalajara (3:06) • Pepe Guízar
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
Made popular in the US by Elvis Presley (really!), Guadalajara sings the praises of one of Mexico’s most beautiful and historic cities, also very important in the history of mariachi music: “Guadalajara, Guadalajara, you have a providential soul, you smell of clean young roses….”

5. Que Bonita es Mi Tierra (3:34) • Ruben Fuentes
Guadalupe Gonzalez, solo voice
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
This is a patriotic song composed by perhaps the most influential mariachi musician, Ruben Fuentes: “Oh, how beautiful is my homeland…. God made a zarape embroidered with sun, and a fancy cowboy’s sombrero from sky, then He formed the spurs with moon and stars — this is how He dressed my homeland. There is no rainbow that can equal the color of her land, her sky and her sea. God created her to be the pride of the world, He gave her blessings without par.”

6. Czardas (4:09) • Vitorrio Monti
Jeff Nevin, trumpet solo
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
The famous Gypsy violin solo, one of my Mom’s favorite pieces… I never learned to play the violin.

THE FLAVORS OF LOVE
“Mariachis have songs that express everything that people experience. For example, everyone knows we sing about love all the time, but there are many different kinds of love: new love, eternal love, passionate love, love that’s… uh… sort of not so good any more, sort of ‘it’s-been-great-but-I-think-we-shouldn’t-see-each-other-anymore’ kind of love… we sing about that too!” – Jeff Nevin, remarks to audience

7. Te Quiero Dijiste (4:10) • María Grever
Florencia Tinoco Barone, soprano
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
Maria Grever was a wonderful and prolific Mexican song composer. This, one of my favorites of her songs, is about the purest kind of love – I prefer to think of it as love between a mother and a child: “’I love you’, you said, taking my hands in your little hands….”

8. La Malagueña (4:42) • Elpidio Ramirez
Oscar Amezcua, solo voice
Conducted by Jeff Nevin
This is one of the most famous and romantic mariachi love songs, with a few interesting turns of phrase that non-Spanish speakers are not likely to catch: “How beautiful your eyes are, here, underneath these eyebrows [ed. you can almost see the singer caressing a woman’s face while singing], they want to see me but if you don’t let them they won’t even want to flutter for you. Malagueña Salerosa [ed. this means the ‘spicy’ woman from Malaga, but it sounds like “Malagueña sale rosa’ which means the woman from Malaga who begins to blush], I want to kiss your lips and tell you how beautiful and enchanting you are, enchanting, like the candor of a rose [ed. ‘candor’ might refer to the openness or honesty of a rose, but the Spanish ‘candor’ is also the ‘stamen’ of a rose, in the heart of the flower].”

9. Ella (3:35) • José Alfredo Jiménez
Oscar Amezcua, solo voice
Conducted by Jeff Nevin
Jose Alfredo Jiménez is one of the best and most popular mariachi composers because of his knack at encapsulating emotions and themes that resonate with average folks – think Johnny Cash, or Tom Hanks. Ella is one of the most requested mariachi songs when we play for Mexican audiences, but unlike most of the others on this concert, without understanding the words to this song you will surely miss its point: “I got tired of begging her, I got tired of saying that without her I would die of pain. I didn’t want to listen to her anymore – if her lips ever parted it was only to say ‘I don’t want you any more’… I wanted to enter into a state of forgetfulness, the way they do in Jalisco, but those mariachis and that tequila made me start to cry…. Then suddenly she was there and I raised my cup with her, I couldn’t resist, it was the final toast of a bohemian with a queen…. Then the mariachis fell silent – my cup fell to the floor without my noticing – she wanted to stay with me when she saw my sadness! But it was already written that that was the night that I was to lose her love.”


10. Gymnopedie #1–Amor Eterno (5:58) • Erik Satie–Juan Gabriel
Guadalupe Gonzalez, solo voice, Barry Perkins, trumpet solo
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
This is an amazing song by one of Mexico’s most accomplished composers, Juan Gabriel, and another song for which you really need to understand the words in order to grasp its meaning. I felt Satie’s innocent Gymnopedie fitting to use as an introduction: “You are the sadness in my eyes that cry silently for your love…. Oh, how much I wish that you were still alive… so we could go on loving one another…. I have suffered so much because of your absence, since that day I have not been happy… I am living in dark solicitude, you are all the love that I have – the saddest memory of Acapulco. Oh, how much I wish that you were still alive… so we could go on loving one another.” He is said to have composed this song after his mother passed away.

11. Cucurrucucú Paloma (4:52) • Tomás Méndez
Florencia Tinoco Barone, soprano
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
This is a sort of “redemption song”, composed by one of the first composers to write what many today consider to be “classical” songs specifically for mariachi. In this song, a narrator sings of a man who is alone, sad, not eating, just drinking all night long since the object of his love died. “Ay, ay, ay… he cried… he begged… he sang of mortal passion. Then, early in the morning, a sad dove comes to sing to his house alone… they swear that this dove is nothing other than her soul that he has been waiting for to return his call. ‘Cucurrucucú’ [ed. the sound a dove makes when singing]… don’t cry for her any more.”

12. Cielito Lindo Huasteco (4:42) • Traditional
Conducted by Jeff Nevin
This is a medley in the huasteco tradition of Northeastern Mexico of songs about “Cielito Lindo”, a common nickname for a small child.

CLASSIC MARIACHI
“Mariachi music is at a point in its history where many people consider it a new Art-music, parallel to Classical music, East Indian classical music and others: mariachi is Mexico’s art music, much like many people consider jazz to be America’s art music.” – Jeff Nevin, remarks to audience

13. Winter III (3:33) • Antonio Vivaldi
Karina Bezkrovnaia, Randy Brinton, violin solos
Jeff Nevin, trumpet solo
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
Throughout the modern history of mariachi (since the 1930’s), countless groups have adapted various pieces from the European classical tradition to play. With the unique classical and mariachi qualifications of the musicians in Mariachi Chamaña Nevín, however, I feel we are considerably more authentic and profound in our understanding and execution of the delicate relationship between these styles of music – as evidenced by this performance of Vivaldi and others.

14. El Gustito (2:14) • Elpidio Ramirez
Oscar Amezcua, solo voice
“Gusto” is joy, “gustito” is a sweet way of saying it: a small, sweet joy. In this song you can hear the virtuoso huasteco violin style while we sing humorous lyrics: “I was singing El Gustito in my sleep, ay la la la…, when your mamá woke me up to see if I was spending a little more time with you! They say that the married man won’t dance at dances, ay la la la…, but they are mistaken because he also knows how to love… but he is reserved!”

15. Granada (5:21) • Agustín Lara
Florencia Tinoco Barone, soprano
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
Though he composed Granada and many other songs in a Spanish style after living in Spain, Augustín Lara is a native of Mexico and one of the best Mexican song composers. This and many of his songs are respected as “classical” songs today, even though he Lara was really more of a pop song composer in his day. Placido Domingo has championed Granada and other Lara songs (as well as Maria Grever songs), contributing immensely to the great and growing respect of Mexican music around the world today.

16. O Sole Mio (3:43) • Eduardo di Capua
Florencia Tinoco Barone, soprano
Conducted by Matthew Garbutt
Though Neapolitan songs have not been a notable part of the mariachi tradition, there is a long tradition of opera singers singing with mariachi. In fact, many of the first mariachi singers, most notably Jorge Negrete, were professional opera singers before they forged a new style of singing with mariachis, and to this day it is not uncommon for opera singers to sing with mariachi accompaniment. Though most often these singers will choose to sing traditional mariachi songs with us (an extension of their singing Granada and other traditionally mariachi songs with orchestral accompaniment), I enjoy performing with wonderful, world-class Mexican opera singers like Florencia who lend our classical song transcriptions the same authenticity we have when we perform traditional mariachi music and our instrumental classical pieces.

17. La Negra (4:13) • Fuéntes/Vargas
Conducted by Jeff Nevin
La Negra, “The Dark-Skinned Woman”, is probably the most indispensable mariachi song we have. It is a traditional dance from Jalisco, the son jalisciensce, which many mariachis use to open every performance, others consider it the quintessential mariachi closer, while still others play it twice to “bookend” their performances! The driving rhythms, active guitar playing, simple harmonies, parallel third melodies, curious lyrics – this is the most traditional mariachi music, like every piece on this concert, orchestrated carefully so as to invite the symphony’s players to experience a bit of our world without compromising the true nature of the mariachi nor of the orchestra.

-JN

All musical arrangements and orchestrations by Jeff Nevin
Recorded live February 28, 2004 Copley Symphony Hall, San Diego, California, USA


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