Alexander Fedoriouk Kalman Magyar | Crossing Paths

Go To Artist Page

Album Links
Folk Sounds Records GreatIndieMusic GroupieTunes PassAlong Tradebit Chondo PayPlay Apple iTunes Bitmunk Emusic

More Artists From
United States - Ohio

Other Genres You Will Love
World: Eastern European Jazz: World Fusion Moods: Type: Instrumental
There are no items in your wishlist.

Crossing Paths

by Alexander Fedoriouk Kalman Magyar

This disc offers a fusion of musical genres, a unique blend of folk instruments, a cross-cultural music exploration, and a collaboration of two masters of folk music presenting an improvisation-driven, jazz-like edge to centuries-old melodies.
Genre: World: Eastern European
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Buy 2 or more of this title and get 10% off
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Gypsy Jive
Share this song!
X
4:27 $0.99
2. Seven Step
Share this song!
X
4:21 $0.99
3. Trading Aces
Share this song!
X
6:01 $0.99
4. All Jazzed Up
Share this song!
X
3:55 $0.99
5. Lamentation
Share this song!
X
4:01 $0.99
6. Sweeping Strings
Share this song!
X
5:45 $0.99
7. Vamp Ahead
Share this song!
X
4:27 $0.99
8. Transitions
Share this song!
X
5:45 $0.99
9. Hora de Caval
Share this song!
X
3:59 $0.99
10. Take Nine
Share this song!
X
4:41 $0.99
11. The Wine of Life
Share this song!
X
4:20 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
CROSSING PATHS
Ethno-Jazz from Eastern and Central Europe
Alexander Fedoriouk began playing the cimbalom at the age of seven in his hometown of Kolomyia, Ukraine, and received his Bachelor's degree in music from the Kiev State Conservatory. He has performed as a soloist with the Cleveland Orchestra, the Odessa Philharmonic Orchestra, Johnstown Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland State University Orchestra, the Manhattan School of Music Symphony Orchestra, the Eletfa Hungarian Folk Band, and the Cheres Ukrainian Band. Alexander is currently a full time member of and featured soloist with the Harmonia Folk Band of Cleveland, where he is currently resides.

Since moving to the United States nearly a decade ago, Alexander has recorded over twenty-five records, which include projects with Nigel Pulsford of Bush, Erick Friedlander of Topaz. Alexander appeared with legendary jazz flautist Herbie Mann at the Blue Note in Manhattan and recorded an album "Eastern European Roots" with Sonna Tera, and performed in Carnegie Hall with John Cale of Velvet Underground. He has appeared live on NPR in Cleveland and New York. He also recorded for two movie soundtracks "Over my dead body" and "Truth about Charlie".

In addition to being heralded as one of the greatest cimbalom players in North America, Alexander is an accomplished percussionist, woodwind player, accordionist, and instrument maker. Currently, Alexander is a bandleader of CCX (Cross Cultural Xperiment) ensemble.

Kalman "Ocsi" Magyar began playing violin at the age of five; he is a graduate of Manhattan School of Music's Preparatory Division, where he studied violin, viola, piano and bass guitar for eight years. He continued his musical development while attending Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, touring with the world-famous Tamburitzans throughout United States and Canada for four years. While with the Tamburitzans Kalman broadened his folk music knowledge beyond his native Hungarian, and began to study and play music from other Central and Eastern European countries.

Kalman is currently an attorney in New Jersey, still pursuing an active performing schedule with several musical groups, including the Eletfa Hungarian Folk Band, Continental Dance Orchestra ("wedding-style Hungarian and American music), Equinox (rock music), and Skitnice (Croatian Music). Kalman plays over twenty musical instruments and has performed at venues such as Epcot Center, Alice Tully Hall, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Library of Congress, Bitter End (New York), and the Clear water Festival. He has written music for and appeared on CBS's national "Sunday Morning" television show and performed live on WQXR (96.3 FM) and WFMU (91.1 FM) in New York.

Alexander and Kalman's paths first crossed at a gathering of musical friends during a house party in Brooklyn in winter 1996. A "jam session" erupted and the synergy between two musicians began. It turned out the two shared a common bond - Kalman had just graduated from the Tamburitzans, and Alex was preparing to join the group, where he would spend a year touring the nation. A close friendship would develop between two musicians. Over the years, they played numerous times together including with the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Bands Cheres, Eletfa, and Harmonia, and performed at venues such as Manhattan's Town Hall, Brooklyn Academy of Music and the Knitting Factory. They have always enjoyed improvising and experimenting with their music, and, in May 2002, decided to record this C.D.

Most of the music on this disc is based on traditional village folk melodies and motifs; some tunes have also been composed. Various genres are apparent in this recording-aside from village folk music, influences of jazz, swing, and blues abound. Alexander and Kalman are schooled in folk music, have utmost respect for it and continue to perform, teach and propagate folk music; in this recording, however, they taken great liberties with the melodies, styles, and forms of the folk tunes upon this music is based. Rather than presenting the folk tunes in their original authentic forms on all the tracks, Alexander and Kalman have strive to use the melodies to propel their own improvisatory senses, thereby creating a fusion of styles perhaps classifiable as "ethno-jass."
This disc offers a fusion of musical genres, a unique blend of folk instruments, a cross-cultural musical exploration, and a combination of two masters of folk music presenting an improvisation-driven, "jazz"-like edge to centuries-old melodies. Let the crossing of cultural and musical paths begin.


Recorded and mixed: Hungaria Record Recording Studios, Rockaway. New Jersey, May-July, 2002
Mastered: SUMA Recording Studio, Painesvile, Ohio-September 2002 by Paul Hamann.
Photography: Andras Balassy, Alexander Fedoriouk
Liner Notes: Kalman Magyar
Graphic Design: Alexander Fedoriouk
Produced by: Alexander Fedoriouk, Kalman Magyar
Release by: Folk Sounds Records
For more information on other Folk Sounds Records releases, please write to:
Folk Sounds Records
P.O.Box 609067
Cleveland, Ohio 44109-0067
Visit the web site: www.FolkSoundsRecords.net
E-mail: FolkSounds@yahoo.com
File under: World / Eastern Europe


"...things really got cooking when Fedoriouk took hammers to cimbalom. His fiery playing was jaw-droppingly fast, evoking gasps from the audience." Peggy Latkovich, The Cleveland Free Times


"Alexander Fedoriouk drew glistening sounds from that most Hungarian of instruments, the cimbalom." Donald Rosenberg, The Cleveland Plain Dealer


Reviews


to write a review

Mary Z. Cox


Brand new and very hot for 2003 is cimbalom master,
Fedoriouk, and Hungarian-American violinist, Magyar,
in this new release of ethno-jazz.

Okay. I like hammered dulcimer music. It's nice, but
I seldom hear a hammered dulcimer CD that I'd pick
as one of my top ten favorite CDs. I own hundreds of
CDs in many genres and this gets my vote of one of the
top ten. A cimbalon may not be exactly a hammered
dulcimer. But it's got to be at least a cousin.

Fedoriouk understands hammers and how to use them. He
is not shy, and when he takes off in his
Romanian/Gypsy/Hungarian/Russian timing it is as if
Attila the Hun has thundered up and down the Steppes
again. I am dazzled by his break on "Trading Aces."
The cimbolin actually growls. Fedoriouk & Magyar's
Moldavian seven step in 9/16 timing has got to be the
cure for anyone bored with 4/4, 3/4/ 6/8 timing over
and over again until asleep at the hammers.
It's hard for me to choose a favorite track. They are
all wonderful and diverse. The first track, Gypsy
Jive, is especially moving.

Magyar's Hungarian violin is a treat even without
Fedoriouk, but the way they drive each other on makes
it nearly impossible to listen in a seated position.
Everytime it plays on my copy, it makes me feel like
the girlfriend of the whirling dervish and I have to
dance wildly around the room to the melodies. This is
a very listenable and danceable CD and it will keep you
alert if you listen in the car on a trip.

The tracks are combinations of middle European folk
melodies, with heavy doses of ethnic jazz. Imagine
gypsy music with a hammered dulcimer gone wild and
growly and you will have a taste of this wonderful CD.
Not for the faint hearted.

Included are: Gypsy Jive, Seven Step, Trading Aces,All
Jazzed Up, Lamentation, Sweeping Strings, Vamp Ahead,
Transitions, Hora de Caval, Take Nine, The Wine of
Life.
I have never seen these artists perform or heard them until this CD, which
I chanced upon by accident.

Tamara Turner, CD Baby

Certainly a distinctive addition to most anyone's collection.
Appropriately termed "Ethno Jazz," this catchy and infectious meeting of Hungarian folk music and instruments with an improvisation-driven, jazz-like edge to melodies that are centuries old, makes for a driving and accessible sound, valuable to both jazz and world music followers. With a touch of that early jazz/"gypsy jazz" sound, this cross-cultural exploration is one that will entice and tickle the ears of those especially looking for the delicacies and rarities among today's trends of musical homogeneity. Certainly a distinctive addition to most anyone's collection.

Dirty Linen Magazine

"excellent," "outstanding," and "impressive"
On Crossing Paths, Kalman Magyar teams with cimbalom master Alexander Fedoriouk for another impressive outing. Lavish use is made of multi-tracking, and the results are excellent, but one must say that it would be nice to hear these two outstanding players produce a CD devoted to straight fiddle-cimbalom duos. Here, they cover ground such an approach couldn't accomodate, with full-ensemble renditions of Balkan dance tunes. They also come up with some fun new wrinkles, notably on "All Jazzed Up," where the cimbalom plays an adapted boogie-woogie bass line under a Gypsy-jazz melody that leads to some delightful improvisation. Balkan fans should definitely check out both discs [Crossing Paths and Kalman Magyar's "Exposed"].
Dirty Linen, Issue #111, April/May 2004.

melanie

You'll Fall in Love...
Wow. A fan of both Gypsy and Folk music from Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece (to name a few...)this album truly sayisfies. Crossing Paths takes already rich traditional musics and turns up the soul yet another notch higher! Amazing musicianship combined with an addictive groove - truly masters of their craft!

Jeremy Hull

Completely satisfying blend of genres
I am a folk dancer and amateur musician. I generally don't like fusion music because it often seems bland by comparison with the original styles that are being combined. But this recording has really pulled it off as far as I'm concerned - I find I can enjoy the music as folk dance music AND as jazz or swing at the same time. As others have said the musicianship is tremendous and the music is inspiring.

Vicki

Uplifting, Fun & Magnificent
Received this CD as a gift, and was surprisingly pleased to hear how magnificent it truly is....the blend of instruments is unique and sounds beautiful. I find it amazing that anyone can play these instuments so deftly and each track is more enticing than the prior one. I love this music and each time I listen to the CD I find that I can't stop from tapping my toes or getting up and dance. Thank you!!!

CD Baby


Appropriately termed "Ethno Jazz," this catchy and infectious meeting of Hungarian folk music and instruments with an improvisation-driven, jazz-like edge to melodies that are centuries old, makes for a driving and accessible sound, valuable to both jazz and world music followers. With a touch of that early jazz/"gypsy jazz" sound, this cross-cultural exploration is one that will entice and tickle the ears of those especially looking for the delicacies and rarities among today's trends of musical homogeneity. Certainly a distinctive addition to most anyone's collection.

Daniel Rosovsky

Spine tingling, Soul chilling Gypsy music from Eastern Europe, Ukraine and Hunga
Alexander Fedoriuk of Ukraine plays the Ukrainian instrument "Tsymbaly" (Wooden Dulcimer) made famous by the Ukrainian mountain people known as "Hutsuly". He is a true master and techician of this instrument and most definitely one of the best in the world. Kalman Magyar is a truly beatufil violinist of Hungary and encaptures the sound and soul of eastern european gyspy music, he is one of the smoothest violinists i have heard - amazing. If you appreciate good music - you must have this CD. It has an effect on your soul.

Daniel Rosovsky

Spine tingling, soul chilling gypsy music from Eastern Europe, Ukraine and Hunga
Alexander Fedoriuk of Ukraine plays the Ukrainian instrument "Tsymbaly" (Wooden Dulcimer) made famous by the Ukrainian mountain people known as "Hutsuly". He is a true master and techician of this instrument and most definitely one of the best in the world. Kalman Magyar is a truly beautiful violinist of Hungary and encaptures the sound and soul of eastern european gyspy music, he is one of the smoothest violinists i have heard - amazing. If you appreciate good music - you must have this CD. It has an effect on your soul.

Roger Reid

exciting blend of tradition and innovation without triteness
(This review is from the perspective a a tsimbl (cymbala) player who plays Jewish music - so it is from a different slant than a Gypsy or Hungarian afficiando. It is an incredible piece of work.)

Just received "Crossing Paths" today, the new CD from Alexander Fedoriouk and Kalman Magyar. Jewish music relevance? Hmmmmm....track 5 is indeed a slow hora from the klezmer repertoire. And Fedoriouk just played with Steven Greenman this past week in New York.

No, it's not for the most part Jewish music - it's Gypsy and Hungarian - but maybe its that if you like Jewish music you'll like this.

I've been a big fan since hearing Fedoriouk's "Cimbalom Traditions" album. In this, he teams up with world class violin player Kalman Magyar, to make an album in which they say : "A & K have the utmost respect for [folk music] and continue to perform, teach and propogate folk music; here, however, they have taken great liberties with the melodies,
styles, and forms of the folks tunes on which the music is based."

Oh yeah. How about an old Bukovina melody played as boogie-woogie?

As I've noted in the past I'm not a general fan of the "klezmer is Jewish Jazz" school, nor the school that says it has to be "radical". [Hint - sex is no longer radical as contrasted with synogogue].

But like the exception I made for Kleztraphobix - ortho-simcha players bringing jazz into thier jewish music - I feel the same way about this. These are top notch - phenominal - players of the folk style they come
from - who have brought blues and swing into this particular project with utterly spectacular results.

This does not displace "Cimbalom Traditions" as my favorite Fedoriouk recording - but I'm going to be listening to "Crossing Paths" over and over again for some time.