Alan Moberg | Remember Me

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The Alan Moberg Show Playlists Alan Moberg's FARTHER ALONG Alan Moberg's REMEMBER ME on iTunes-Canada Alan Moberg's NORTHERN LOVE Video of Alan Moberg singing "The Williams Lake Stampede Song" video of Alan Moberg singing "The Ballad of Sally June" video of Alan Moberg singing "Saltwater Cowboy" Video of Alan Moberg singing "Snowball" Video of Alan Moberg & Ed Peekeekoot singing "Red Man Plays the Blues" Video of Alan Moberg singing "Praise Yodel" Ed Peekeekoot's in the key of cree CD

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Country: Country Folk Folk: Minstrel Moods: Type: Lyrical
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Remember Me

by Alan Moberg

Songs to Dream by, Delight in, of the Coast, of the Country and of the Heart He is country. He is folk. He is early rock. He is gospel. He is Western Roots. BC Country Music Hall of Fame.
Genre: Country: Country Folk
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1. Red Man Plays the Blues (feat. Ed Peekeekoot)
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3:19 $0.99
2. Sally June
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4:16 $0.99
3. Ashcroft Stampede
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3:06 $0.99
4. Ganges Waltz
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4:42 $0.99
5. Blue Bayou
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3:20 album only
6. I Saw the Sparrow's Fall
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7. I Came to Believe
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3:16 album only
8. Sunday Night Seine Boats
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4:06 $0.99
9. Please Remember Me
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3:37 album only
10. Working Fool
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3:47 $0.99
11. Above the Clouds
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12. Saltwater Cowboy
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes

JUNE 2010 SENIOR LIVING MAGAZINE VANCOUVER ISLAND
MR. BRITISH COLUMBIA
By Annie Palovcik

B.C. crooner Alan Moberg has been painting vivid pictures of the province he loves for over four decades. Along the way, he has released 16 albums and been inducted into the B.C. Country Music Hall of Fame. Alan was born on the coast near Pender Harbour to a fishing family, and has always done hard and rugged work throughout the province, whether fishing, logging, or as a telephone lineman, merchant seaman or landscape gardener.

“When I was young,” says Alan Moberg, “I heard many songs about places - certainly in the United States they celebrate their places - I heard the songs from back East that celebrated places in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. But I heard very few songs about British Columbia. So, one of my missions has been to write these songs about B.C. and her people.”
Howard White, publisher of the well-loved *Raincoast Chronicles* says, “Moberg has lived the west coast experience to the fullest, he brilliantly conveys his love and attachment to the great spaces and unforgettable people of his home turf. From evoking a starlit night on the Skeena to calling the boisterous action of the Williams Lake Stampede, from depicting the miraculous journey of the wild salmon to painting the heartrending beauty of the Cariboo sunrise. Moberg does for B.C.'s interior ranchland and coastal rainforest what Ian Tyson does for Alberta cow country and Stan Rogers did for the Great Lakes.”

Alan's musical career began when he wrote the song “Saltwater Cowboy” in honour of the man who most influenced him to start playing the guitar, the man “who taught me my very first chords.” Red Nicholson lived next door to him, and he played the guitar and sang the old songs. “I was enthralled, of course, by what he could do, the stories he told,” Alan remembers.
These neighbours had moved their house from a logging camp in Jervis Inlet down to Pender Harbour. “The bay we lived in was a tidal bay, and they floated those houses in on the tide as high as they could onto the shore and built foundations under them.” Many of Alan’s songs capture historical snapshots of a way of life that has ended. “Sunday Night Seine Boats,” for example, takes listeners to a time when fishing was in its heyday.

The Williams Lake Stampede, an institution for more than 80 years, is still going strong. When Alan wrote his classic song, "The Williams Lake Stampede,"people used to camp right beside the fairgrounds. Some of them even came in horse-drawn covered wagons. At the Stampede, different cowboy skills are tested, like saddle bronc riding and bull riding. “It was also a time when people got together,” says Alan, “when probably in those older days they wouldn't have seen each other all year because they were busy on their own ranches and distances between them were far. So, it was a time to swap stories and enjoy being together.”

Alan is one of the finest yodellers on the Coast. “I remember being at a Roy Rogers movie as a child.” He has been yodelling ever since.

“Alan has many gifts, not the least of which is a bell-like vocal quality, which we don't hear enough of today in this less-than-gentle musical time," says Canadian country singer Laurie Thain.

Alan’s ballads contain traditional western themes of bravery, innocence, survival and of his admiration for the cross-cultural friendships Canadians share with First Nations people. “Song for an Indian Carver” is a tribute to his Gitxsan brother, the late Walter Harris, who received both the Governor General’s Award and the Order of Canada for his magnificent artwork.

“[Walter's] mother, Mrs. Harris, adopted me,” says Alan. “It’s a matrilineal society in their culture and the crests of the tribe are passed on through the mother. So, I am now a Killer Whale, by adoption at a traditional feast.”
Like many of his heroes, Alan Moberg has walked the long hard road of life and has known when to ask for a helping hand. As a result, gospel music is part of Alan’s repertoire. His song “This Could be the Day” has been performed by The Mennonite Men’s Choir of Abbotsford and the choir of Knox Presbyterian in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Not everyone can live in a house on Rainbow Road, which Alan did, but he has used that as a metaphor for choosing to leave the big city and come to a more simplified style of life on Salt Spring Island. His songs celebrate the lives of ordinary men and women, giving them identity and dignity. He sings reflectively, “We’re tired of chasing that elusive pot of gold.”

But simplicity doesn’t mean stagnation. Besides being a landscape gardener, Alan has become host of a program on Salt Spring’s new radio station, streamed live at www.cfsi-fm.com each Wednesday at noon, The Alan Moberg Show. He airs many of the songs he has loved and performs, from early Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash to Roy Orbison and Guy Clark. Alan continues to perform his music throughout the province.


ALAN MOBERG SCHEDULE 2011

Feb 12, Cariboo Cowboy Concert
with Ed Peekeekoot
100 Mile House, BC

March 26, 2011
Western Roots/Country Gospel Concert
St. Andrew's Church
Nanaimo, BC

May 28, 2011 (afternoon and evening)
Maritime Festival
Ladysmith, BC

August 27 and 28, 2011
Western Roots/Country Gospel Concerts
Comox Valley Exhibition Fall Fair
Courtenay, BC





*************************************
Past Performances included
McPherson Playhouse, Victoria, Christmas Eve, webcast live worldwide
St. Ann's Academy Auditorium, Victoria
Capital Festival, BC Day Celebrations, Victoria* a repeat engagement
Canada Day Festival, Langley*a repeat engagement
Williams Lake Stampede*honoured and the headline performer
Cottonwood Music Festival, Fort St. James headline act with Ed Peekeekoot
Kamloops Cowboy Festival* a repeat engagement
And at Cafes, Schools, Churches, Theatres, Community Halls, Parks & Fairs & Exhibitions

Bookings: Annie Palovcik TK Media anniep@saltspring.com 250 537 9571

******************************
These days he is wearing more than his cowboy hat. After decades making music from vinyl to downloads, Alan Moberg becomes a radio host. THE ALAN MOBERG SHOW broadcasts Wednesdays from Salt Spring Island, BC on CFSI-fm at 107.9, and is also heard worldwide at www.cfsi-fm.com, noon to one, Pacific Time.

THE ALAN MOBERG SHOW--special music mainstream radio doesn't play- is a fascinating mix of his many recordings (sixteen albums in total) as well as songs and singers he loves well and who have influenced his music—such as Johnny Cash, Guy Clark, Rodney Crowell, Townes Van Zandt, Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison Stuart Hamlin, T Texas Tyler, Paul Robeson, Hank Snow, and yodeling mentors such as Roy Rogers. Listen to Alan Moberg as he weaves a magical musical radio spell, Wednesdays, noon, Pacific time.
ALAN MOBERG EPK (electronic press kit)

*************************************************
ALAN MOBERG
Songs to Dream by, Delight in, of the Coast, of the Country and of the Heart


Biography
He is country. He is folk. He is early rock. He is gospel. He is Western Roots. He is known as The Saltwater Cowboy. Inducted into the BC Country Music Hall of Fame in 2008 for his extensive body of original and moving songs, with traditional western themes like bravery, innocence, survival and the cross-cultural friendships we share with First Nations people, his songs celebrate the lives of ordinary men and women, giving them identity & dignity. He has known what it’s like to walk the long rocky road of life and ask for a helping hand, from a friend or from a greater power. He is a BC Troubadour as well for his extensive repertoire of songs about the province he so loves. And after the Winter Games, the rest of the country wants to continue that love affair. He has the ability to put smiles on people’s faces and in their hearts.

Reviews & Tributes
“Howard White of Harbour Publishing, says “Moberg does for BC’s interior ranchland and coastal rain forest what Ian Tyson does for Alberta cow country…a moving portrayal of the west beyond the west by a virtuoso singer-songwriter.”
“His Beautiful British Columbia quickly became the anthem of our Festival.” Lionel Conant, Chair, Cottonwood Music Festival, Fort St. James, BC ;
He was honoured at the Williams Lake Stampede for the 40th anniversary of his Williams Lake Stampede song. This classic folksong has promoted BC’s cowboy culture round the world, sung and recorded by -Chor Leoni, Calgary Boys’ Choir, Maple Leaf Singers, Geo Hamilton IV.
Articles “Mr. British Columbia” www.seniorlivingmag.com/articles/mr-british-columbia
“Salt Water Cowboy” www.gulfislands.net/aqua/22.pdf; www.gulfislands.net/aqua/23.pdf

Discography
Moberg has made 16 recordings, with his latest, REMEMBER ME released in 2008
Six CDs are available (& sound clips) at www.alanmoberg.com on iTunes-Canada

Radio, TV, Video
Host of The Alan Moberg Show, a radio hour each Wednesday at noon, Pacific time,
107.9 fm or livestream at www.cfsi-fm.com
Radio airplay coast to coast in Canada; and in the U.S. Ireland, Australia.
Charted in the Top Ten of Folk/Roots/Blues at university & community radio
The single "Please Remember Me" released to country radio in Canada
Recent appearances include BC Global TV, CFJC, Kamloops and Shaw Cable, Van. Isl.
Christmas Eve show from the McPherson Playhouse, Victoria on a world-wide webcast
Various videos: See links at www.alanmoberg.com/promotion.html

Performances (partial)
Country Gospel Music Sunday Festival, Headline Act, Providence Farm, Duncan
Canada Day Festival, Langley
Capital Festival’s BC Day, Langford stage & St. Ann’s Academy Main Stage, Victoria
McPherson Playhouse, Victoria, a Xmas Eve concert, filmed for live world-wide webcast
St. Ann’s Academy Auditorium, Victoria-Christmas Miracles & Northern Lights concert
Williams Lake Stampede honoured and the Headline Act
Cottonwood Music Festival, Fort St. James, Headline Act, with Ed Peekeekoot
Kamloops Cowboy Festival
Salt Spring Island Folk Club, Headline Act, with Ed Peekeekoot
Bookings: Annie Palovcik TK Media anniep@saltspring.com 250 537 9571

***********************************************************************************************************
In July, Alan Moberg and his song Sally June were one of the Top Ten Picks featured in the Province Playlist. It is an emotional and intense ballad about a young Native girl who leaves for a life in the city. The song was available for free download for a month.
http://www.theprovince.com/entertainment/music/downloads/jul-27.html
This campaign will continue nationally in other newspapers in Canada this fall.

Lyrics to Sally June by Alan Moberg

SALLY JUNE Words and music © Alan Moberg



Near summer’s end we kissed good-bye and you stepped onto the plane
And in your hand you clutched the brooch I carved for you and taken so much pain
We wished you luck and hoped you’d come home soon
And then you left your Mom and me, Sally June

It’s autumn now and the leaves fall from the trees onto the cold northern ground
And underneath the cloud of smoke this village is a sad and lonely town
It seems so long ago since you were city bound
Oh, why did you go, Sally June?

Grampa, Mom and me and Davey Brown and little Sammy Jo and Lorne
Went seaweed picking just this spring and camped a week or so along the shore
And Grampa said he wished you were here, too
Oh, when you coming home, Sally June?

Now summer’s come and gone and the salmon have returned into the streams
And snow melts from the rocks and trickles down onto the beach like my old dreams
Your Mom and me we wait the winter through
Thinking only of you, Sally June

Br.
And the people say times must change
And the people say old days must fade away

It was a newspaper story that I read way back on page forty-one
Told of a young girl found in a skid row hotel dead and all alone
And I got scared just thinking about you
When you coming home Sally June?
Where did you go Sally June?
Are you coming home sweet Sally June?

***************************************************

Sixteen recordings. Who knew? That Salt Spring Island’s own Alan Moberg had recorded that much. The same age as Bob Dylan, he has continued to make music for decades.

And because of his exciting and extensive repertoire Alan was inducted into the BC Country Music Hall of Fame in 2008

REMEMBER ME has Songs of the Coast, Songs of the Country, Songs of the Heart. on iTunes-Canada with original song downloadable by track at www.cdbaby.com

The heart of the collection is undoubtedly Rodney Crowell’s Please Remember Me, which Moberg delivers with the passion and power it demands. It has been released as a single to Canadian country radio. Blue Bayou and Roy Orbison fans, get ready! This will be the version to have, with soaring, bell-like vocals and Louisiana rhythms. And there’s something spiritual from his hero, Johnny Cash.

These are songs to Dream by, Dance to, Delight in. Alan explores perhaps previously uncharted territories of the heart, whether in the exquisitely slow and romantic accordion rhythms of The Ganges Waltz; or in Above the Clouds, a most tender song of love. Love has many forms and Sally June lyrically paints the caring and concerns of parents for a rural Native child who has left home for the city.

This is also vintage Moberg, in reprises like the Ashcroft Stampede, backed by the fine toe-tapping, swing-your-partner fiddle of Adrian Dolan of Victoria. Or his signature song, Saltwater Cowboy, which reflects his blended musical influences. Alan adds to his extensive body of British Columbia folk songs with Sunday Night Seine Boats depicting the heyday of the fishing industry.

Some of the finest island musicians have worked on the recording. Bill Henderson’s guitar(Chilliwack) breaks out in Alan’s hot country dance tune, Working Fool. Donn Tarris adds incredible dimensions with his soft and swaying slide guitar. Ramesh Meyers provides harmonies so fine they seem like shadows, as well as the solid and stylish bass underpinnings. A breakout for Moberg is a song co-written with his Vancouver Island friend, Ed Peekeekoot, of the Ahtahkakoop Cree First Nation. A saucy, sentient song called Red Man Plays the Blues, this duet was chosen as the first track.

**************************************************************************************************************************

Alan has received these comments on his YouTube videos from a fan who calls himself Toiler280. Thanks, Toiler.

Williams Lake Stampede
This is the definitive song about the ONLY stampede!! Although I have heard this song many times over the years this is the first time I have seen a "live" performance. Alan - you are my new country star...right after Corb Lund and Johnny Reid!! Well done you!!!!!!!
The Ballad of Sally June
This is an incredible song. It is frickin' awesome!! I am simply going to have to go to the website and find the albums with your music, Alan!! It is old time country-West Coast music!! One day soon My wife and I will take in a concert where you are performing!! Keep up the great work!!
See the videos on the CD Baby link. See all Alan's CDs at www.alanmoberg.com
*********************

BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA, on Alan Moberg's "Saltwater Cowboy" CD,
and lots of British Columbia folk songs on his other CDs, such as "Northern Love", or "Remember Me"

Alan Moberg is taking bookings for 2011 at Folk Festivals and Country Fairs, Rodeos and Exhibitions and Holiday weekend Celebrations. In fact, anyplace that wants to continue the love affair with celebrating British Columbia ignited by the Winter Olympic Games. And no one sings of the province more passionately than Alan Moberg, of its coast, of its country, and of its heart.
Contact Annie Palovcik, TK Media, 250 537 9571 anniep@saltspring.com


***************************

BRITISH COLUMBIA FOLK SONGS
BY CANADA'S WEST COAST TROUBADOUR
Alan Moberg, BC’s Coast and Country

SHORT BIOGRAPHY

ALAN MOBERG, inducted into the British Columbia Country Music Hall of Fame October 2008, has won the BMI (SOCAN) award for “an outstanding contribution to Canadian music”. He has released 16 recordings over four decades. Radio airplay thoughout Canada and in the United States. His Williams Lake Stampede song has been recorded and performed by choirs globally, including the Calgary Boys’ Choir. He is CANADA’S WEST COAST TROUBADOUR.


PERFORMANCE DESCRIPTION

Alan Moberg has an extensive body of original and moving songs of his beloved British Columbia. His songs travel over the geography of our vast province, with songs and stories about our history as well, and about cross cultural friendships with First Nations. He is known as “The Saltwater Cowboy” for his blended identity, a singer of the coast and a singer of BC’s interior ranch lands. This veteran singer-songwriter entertains and informs by painting British Columbia with songs reflecting life on land and sea. He sings of rivers and ocean, of ranching, of farming, of fishing and of legends and history and traditions. A headstart to 2010 awareness of our vast province, by presenting in song its many towns and villages, cowboy culture, Native culture, coastal culture, with stories about every part. Music provided by guitar, with vocals and story telling.
“What we see and experience in our environment creates our identity.”



Alan sings about traditional western themes like bravery, innocence, survival, of his admiration for and the cross cultural friendships we share with First Nations people. He is an adopted member of the Gitxan Nation.

“Moberg has lived the west coast experience to the fullest…he brilliantly conveys his love and attachment to the great spaces and unforgettable people of his home turf. From evoking a starlit night on the Skeena to calling the boisterous action of the Williams Lake Stampede, from depicting the miraculous journey of the wild salmon to painting the heartrending beauty of the Cariboo sunrise. Moberg does for BC's interior ranchland and coastal rainforest what Ian Tyson does for Alberta cow country and Stan Rogers did for the Great Lakes…his NORTHERN LOVE CD represents a moving portrayal of the west beyond the west by a virtuoso singer-songwriter. "Howard White, Publisher of the Raincoast Chronicles. Harbour Publishing.

"Alan is no doubt one of Canada's best. It also goes without saying that Alan has an open invitation to appear on our airwaves should he tour in Toronto. “If I were him though, having travelled out West, I would just stay put as it's so beautiful there!”
Ron Burd, Musical Director, CIUT Radio Toronto

"It is so refreshing to hear a voice from the West Coast. I grew up listening to Felix Leclerc, Gilles Vigneault, Pauline Julien, and the poets from Quebec, who sang about French Canadian culture. I remember listening to their songs and identifying myself to their lyrics. I knew who I was. When 1 came here and realized that most of the music was borrowed from the States I was at a loss to know what people from the West could sing about. What we see and experience in our environment creates our identity and Alan has captured that in his music." Suzanne Mackenzie, Educator

“It is hard to believe Alan Moberg, raised in a fishing family, could have nailed the feeling, the flavor and atmosphere of a western event he had never even witnessed, so absolutely perfectly. If ever there was a song that captured the image and spirit of a time or a place, this song had to be it. Three decades of listeners have never tired of the song, it is still one of his most requested wherever he performs. The young man from the coast had quite a gift of imagination to have done it so well." Elizabeth Twan. Williams Lake Stampede Association, BC re The Williams Lake Stampede song

"Alan's music has the effect of making us proud to be from BC. He was born here and somehow his roots have permeated his very essence as a writer, his love of the coast touches every word of his saltwater coastal lyrics. Alan has many gifts not the least of which is a bell-like vocal quality, which we don't hear enough of today in this less than gentle musical time." Laurie Thain, Pure Pacific Music


DESCRIPTION OF PERFORMANCE

Each performance weaves the music and stories of the many places and differing peoples of our beloved British Columbia. Music provided by guitar, with vocals and story telling. Songs and stories will be selected from the below for any given hour-long show.


Dogwood Country is my picture of British Columbia from the days when it was a more resource-based place, using the floral emblem of the province, the dogwood. I stole the idea from Alberta as at that time they had "Wild Rose Country" on their licence plates. So I thought, then this must be Dogwood Country. It speaks from the point of view of someone who’s probably in Vancouver and saying “I’ve fished your silver salmon, I’ve picked your fruit in the Okanagan, and I’ve worked some lumber camps around Prince George, from the Kootenays to Vancouver, for a time I was quite a mover, then I headed out to make my stake once more”. In my younger days, it was very common for a fisherman to be going out to sea, coming home after a long season, loggers going out to the woods to work, and or even “apple jacks” going to the Okanagan to pick fruit, and then getting to spend longer periods of time in the city or with their families. Until they had to out to work again. Geographically it speaks about the rivers running high from the melting snows, thus painting a picture of the province for the listeners. When I was young, I heard many songs about places—certainly in the United States they celebrate their places—I heard the songs from back East that celebrated places in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland . But I heard very few songs about British Columbia. So one of my missions has been to write these songs about BC and her people, Dogwood Country reflects that.

From Salt Spring to Egmont is kind of my life story in three minutes. It mentions where I was born, a little place called Pender Harbour. We lived on Agamemnon Channel that goes up to Jervis Inlet, and eventually Jervis Inlet goes up into Princess Louisa Inlet where the famous Chatterbox Falls is. The song tells about my first boat trip around Norman Point, (now called Daniel Point), and how I wake up to the screaming of the seagulls and the eagles outside the boat cabin door. It also mentions the “hissing and the clicking of a Vivian motor. In those days most of the engines were either one or two cylinder Easthopes or Vivians. The thing about a one cylinder is that it went “putt-putt-putt” or “duff-duff-duff” but the two cylinder went “padup-padup-padup-padup”. If you were inside, you could hear the rocker arms clicking and clacking and the engine going “patsshh, pastsshh patsshh. So It was a real rhythmic thing and I'm sure those sounds seeped right into my soul. This song is a journey, that alludes to struggles I had with alcohol. It tells about my parents and how they did the best they could with what they had, and asks the question “Will you talk about me that way?”

Saltwater Cowboy was written in honour of the gentleman who most influenced me to start playing the guitar, who taught me my first chords. Red Nicholson lived next door to us, and he played the guitar and sang the old songs, and I was enthralled, of course, by what he could do, the stories he told. So he and his father-in-law and mother-in-law and his wife and himself and one child at that time, they moved from St. Vincent’s Bay, from a logging camp in Jervis Inlet down to Pender Harbour. And what they did was they were able to keep the houses they had in the logging camp and put them on rafts and floated them down. But the bay we lived in was a tidal bay, and they would have floated those houses in on the tide as far as they could. And somehow they actually put the two houses on shore and built foundations under them. As I sing, “We had two new neighbours in Granny Reed’s Orchard.´ And it was Red who taught me how to play the guitar. Red had strong opinions on things. He was quite a progressive in his day I guess. He saw me as a young teenager with a penchant for drinking, which was quite common in those days, and at one point, certainly, he warned me and chastised me, and that makes its way into this song. It’s a unique song in that it has yodeling, the type of yodeling that is probably from the era of the late great Jimmy Rodgers, who died in 1933, whom many consider to be the great grand-daddy of country music. Those are the kinds of songs Red would have sung, so it makes that memory come alive. It’s become kind of a theme song, or trademark song, for yours truly.

Cariboo Sunrise is a song about a man hitchhiking to the Cariboo country. It was inspired by a First Nations man I saw outside our home in Langley. We lived right beside a church there and quite often somebody might stop in at our house and ask for a sandwich, because they thought it was the minister’s home. Well, I saw this Native fellow across the street and I went out and offered him a sandwich. He told me he was hitchhiking home to Williams Lake. Hence, the concept for this song. It mentions the places along the way, starting out in Chilliwack and getting up into the “Canyon” then to Cache Creek, but his main aim is to get home to the Cariboo country and to see the Cariboo sunrise reflected in his sweetheart’s eyes.

The Williams Lake Stampede is a historic Stampede; it's been around for more than 80 years. At the time I wrote it, people used to camp right beside the fair grounds. Some of them would even have come in a horse drawn covered wagon. So the song is a historical look at the Williams Lake Stampede. I use the towns in a rhythmic and rhyming way--"Sugar Cane, Horsefly, Kleena Kleen, Alkali, Prince George and Quesnel; Soda Creek, Cache Creek, Anahim, Bella Coola, Lillooet, you know darn well"--just to provide the sense that people came from all around to meet at the Stampede. A Stampede is a rodeo where different cowboy skills are tested, like saddle bronc riding and bull riding. But it was also a time when people got together when probably in those older days they wouldn't have seen each other all year because they were busy on their own ranches and distances between them were far. So it was a time to swap stories and enjoy being together.

The Ashcroft Stampede The little town of Ashcroft, near Cache Creek, is right down on the banks of theThompson River. It is a historic town about125 years old. It was a gateway to the settlement of the north during the gold rush. In my song, I picture it as a place where people are going to come from different areas throughout the region, to have some good fun, to watch the events, and get together. At the end of the song I sing "I might wear a hole in my boots tonight/Dancing around 'til broad daylight", but being a hard working rancher, he says " No time for sleeping in, gotta get back out to the ranch again." That's how devoted and dedicated these Southern Cariboo people are, to their way of life, to their animals, they take their responsibilities very seriously.

Song for an Indian Carver is a tribute to my Gitxan brother Walter Harris, who received both the Governor General’s award and the Order of Canada for his magnificent artwork. His mother, Mrs. Harris, adopted me. It’s a matrilineal society in their culture and the crests of the tribe are passed on through the mother. So I am now a Killer Whale, by adoption at a traditional feast. This song tells about my getting teary-eyed seeing the children dance. It comes from a time of being at 'Ksan, where traditional longhouses have been reconstructed. I attended some ceremonies there where the children came out and danced. And really, it touched me, touched something deep inside me. It talks about the art form that had been theirs since time immemorial that has been revived through artists like Walter, and others, many others.

Return to the River is a song that alludes to a young woman who leaves her native village and goes to Vancouver to make a new life. But the question is asked, Does she still remember the roots from which she came? “You must remember the laughter of an earlier time”. It’s written from the point of view of her parents. This girl has moved away to the big city, as many do and they long for her to return one day. It was inspired by old friends of mine from Bella Coola and Bella Bella. Bella Coola has the river; Bella Bella had the boardwalks. It also refers to the "old house we lived in" which was finally torn down. When I first went to Bella Bella there were many large frame houses where extended families lived together. But as time went on, these homes were torn down and replaced by smaller ones which housed, in the main, one individual family, reflecting a change in their traditional culture. The visual imagery in the song tells of the the closeness of the people to nature.

"Won't you return to the river for it's flowing still
It's saying we love you and we always will
Cedar branches are hanging o'er a fast flowing stream
And a plane flying you homeward is our greatest dream"

Salal Brush Roots refers to my birth place, the countryside I was born in on the Sunshine Coast. It uses the metaphors of logging and fishing . It says that in those days my Daddy caught his salmon close to home, which he did. Later he got into deep-sea trolling in Queen Charlotte Sound, but he started out fishing near our home in Egmont and caught as many as 80 spring salmon in St. Vincent’s Bay one afternoon. It uses images of salal brush, alder trees, cedar trees, and the Douglas fir, which were so common and dear to me as a child of this coast. As well I use some words from Chinook jargon. Now, that was a language that was used by almost everyone in B.C. before the turn of the 20th century. It was primarily composed of the language of the Chinook tribe, situated at the mouth of the Columbia River in the United States but it also had a significant amount of Salish, Nuchalnuth, Bella Bella, and a little bit of English and French as well. The primary reason it was born and used is because there are a number of different First Nations languages on the coast, very unlike each other, and so a trading language was needed for the Natives themselves as well as the first settlers. The word Tyee which is quite commonly used now to mean a large spring salmon, originally meant a highly regarded Chief. The word mesatchie is the word for bad. When I was younger people commonly used it to speak of someone who couldn't hold his liquor, who went kind of crazy when he drank, "He went mesatchie." (I can point to other chinook words and phrases their meanings and their origins.)

Now there’s a slow part to this song. It goes to a waltz, and that slow part is the nostalgia theme about friendship, of opening a jar of salmon , and having the salmon and rice with friends. For the Bella Bella people years ago when I first met them, and I guess others probably on the Northwest Coast, rice was probably easier to buy and easier to keep and cook than potatoes, so it was quite common to have canned salmon and rice. The idea of brewing up a cup of coffee and just talking about these old days and how we were proud that we felled timber and about the fish we caught paint a historical but wistful theme.

Spell of the Cariboo is a historical song. It tells about making a journey from the Coast up into the gold fields of the Cariboo. It mentions “the rumble of the stage wheels on the ground as they roll through Clinton town headed for the northern plains, where men sought their golden gains, in the Cariboo.” And it speaks of Barkerville, the town that grew up around the gold panning, inland from Quesnel. And it refers to Judge Begbee, the “hanging judge” he was called, because apparently he was quite quick to hang people. “You can hear the gavel bang, and Judge Begbee say “You’ll hang! in the Cariboo” But what happened I guess, is that many went to seek gold but didn’t find it yet remained to establish cattle ranches, and become lumber workers and build the towns, the towns and places that are there now: “Hear the hammers building towns, in the Cariboo”. It’s about a person who sits alone, perhaps by a river in the evening breeze, and hears the history on the wind. You know, as you’re driving south from those places, the times have changed, and you see that the towns have come now and I say once you learn this about the Cariboo you never feel quite the same. In the Cariboo, “you will know the spirit of that land” and its people, the independence and hard working spirit, the love of the land, which I still believe exists in the Cariboo.

Northern Love I wrote after going for a visit to the Hazelton area, and I hadn’t been there for a long time. And I genuinely felt loved, genuinely knew the spirit of my Gitxan relations , my adopted relations. There is a sense where all these things that perhaps I did in my life which I was not proud of, are forgotten and the good remains. And we did sit around and sing “until the early morning light”. Or pretty close to it anyways. We loved it. We loved to sit and sing and sing the old songs and enjoy each other’s company. My brother-in-law Walter Harris has a picture he painted called Skeena the Running Wolf , and it has a Native-style representation of a wolf, but the background is more contemporary art and shows a very prominent mountain in Hazelton, which some call roche de bos but some of the others up there call stikodn. And it shows the Skeena River running across the face of this mountain. Skeena the Running Wolf. It’s a white wolf, so when I say in the song “Have you heard the sound of the white wolf in the winter when she calls?” it’s based on Walter’s picture. Walter, as I have said, is a Killer Whale of the Fireweed Tribe and I am adopted into his tribe. His wife is a Wolf, from the Wolf Tribe, and the name for wolf in Gitxan is lahteybou. The song talks about my returning there and seeing “the faces of the children” making me want to return again. It contrasts the idea of going to Hawaii and experiencing the warmth there or perhaps Mexico. It contrasts that with my feeling just as warm when I go to Hazelton and feel the warmth of the people there.

St. Mary’s Spring is a song about The Queen Charlotte Islands, or Haida Gwaii, as the people there call it. It means “Place of the Haidas”. When I was in Haida Gwaii, the Queen Charlotte Islands, 30 years ago now, one of the Chiefs took me to a little spring that’s just north of Skidegate on the highway there and he told me the legend: If you take a drink from the spring you’ll always return to the Islands. And so I drank from the spring, and so far that’s come true, I’ve returned a lot of times. The song starts out with me sitting on the beach at Tlell. I’m looking out, seeing the crab boats far off shore fishing for crab, and I talk about driving that stretch of road from Massett down to Skidegate, which is quite a drive, about an hour and a half long. But I mention how the people are separated from the Mainland by Hecate Strait, which runs all the way from Cape St. James up to Rose Spit on the eastern shore. And that this separation makes for a unique culture and a difference in outlook there on Haida Gwaii. And once again I am captured by the hospitality of the people and return “again and again”

Rainbow Road was written after I moved to Salt Spring Island. We lived at 620 Rainbow Road. When I lived in Surrey I had addresses like 9837 127B Street, 8393 144th Street . Now I live at 620 Rainbow Road. Which address would you choose? So I wrote that song about living there. We can’t all live on Rainbow Road, but I have used that as a metaphor for choosing to leave the big city and in many cases coming to a more simplified style of life on Salt Spring Island. As I sing, “We’re tired of chasing that elusive pot of gold”. Many of us, when we came here, settled for a more frugal lifestyle and did what we could. There are many diverse people here. There are people who are Nobel Peace Prize winners; there are people who had, perhaps, significant titles to their names when they lived “off-island”. But now they are living as Islanders. At the time I came it seemed like a lot of people were doing gardening or whatever job they could to stay on this beautiful island, and many were musicians and artists. So they were doing what they could to live here in this vibrant community and and pursue their first love. And to use this subsistence form of income to make it possible to stay here. So that’s what Rainbow Road’s about, choosing to stay on this island and choosing to relate to each other “Living on Rainbow Road we help each other carry our load”. So, hopefully, that’s in it too, that we’ve gone back to a more rural style where we help, not just physically, but support each other emotionally. And I think there’s a lot of that on Salt Spring Island. There’s probably more smiles per square foot in Ganges and “Hi Al’s” than anywhere else I have been. So it’s a vibrant, great place to live. It also has its dark side, as any place does, and I’ve tasted that, but that’s living.

Fulford Valley, I wrotewith Ted Akerman in mind. Not long after I came to live here on Salt Spring Island, I spoke on the ferry to a guy with a cowboy hat who was coming back from Gabriola Island, where he cut Christmas trees under the power line rightage there, and gathered these and sold them. He told me had lived on Salt Spring Island all his life, as his family had, the Akermans. They came here in the 1860s and their earliest forebear married a Chief’s daughter from the Cowichan Tribe. As I sing of him, “My roots go deep, like the Cowichan in me”. So they had not only longevity as far as settlers go, which is quite long for Salt Spring, but they had those deep roots from the Cowichan tribe. I like to think this song honours all those pioneers here on the Island, those settlers who did what they could and what they had to to settle here. I come from a background where people were fishers and farmers, and so on Salt Spring I like to see that. I like to touch base with people who subsisted here and were indigenous in that sense, as well as knowing the majority of people who come here perhaps as retirees or artists or come more recently.

Song for Valdy We have quite a few famous people living here on Salt Spring Island. We have Robert Bateman, the nature artist, others like former CBC host Arthur Black, and Nobel Peace Prize winners and we have Valdy. Valdy is a well-known folk hero who has been singing his folksongs and rock and roll folk songs since the early ‘70s. He is known right across Canada and the States and he is truly a Canadian icon. Well, when Valdy’s on Salt Spring, he’s just like one of us. I sing “He’s a good ole boy and he’s a star.” The first Salt Spring fall fair I came to I witnessed the enthusiasm for Valdy. And so I wrote this as a tribute to Valdy “that when it comes to music on Salt Spring Island, Valdy’s still the King.´ And Valdy, of course, has been seen walking down Stewart Road playing his guitar in his coveralls and probably he’s writing a song that day. On the CD I am honoured that Valdy came on board and sang harmony on the chorus. And he does an Elvis impersonation at the end. “Thank you. Thank you very much.”

Beautiful British Columbia by Eric Edwards aka Alberta Slim. He wrote way back. He wrote a song called When It’s Apple Blossom Time in Annapolis Valley, that’s in Nova Scotia. It’s a song that I heard as a child. But he wrote Beautiful British Columbia and I always quipped, “What’s wrong with this picture, that this song was written by Alberta Slim?” It talks about the beauty of British Columbia , he calls it an “evergreen playground” and cites the dogwood floral emblem, which we don’t hear mentioned so much, but it is our floral emblem. I don’t know if it is true today, but as a child I know it was illegal to cut down a dogwood tree, the native dogwood. He also uses the Chinook jargon in this song, mentioning the big tyee salmon that we fish off our shores. Tyee has been used for a large spring salmon, but it is actually the Chinook word for “Chief”, so meaning “great” or “big”. The song mentions Vancouver Island. . It’s quite poetic and speaks of the beauty of British Columbia.

Praise Yodel Yodeling is an art form that was used by the cowboys out on the range when they were driving the cattle. It was used by the early country singers, like the late Jimmy Rodgers. Even Hank Snow, our Canadian icon used it for a while. And so it was a cowboy thing. However, in the early 1950s there were yodelers in Western music that almost made a hybrid of the cowboy yodel and the Swiss yodel. Kenny Roberts had a song, She Taught Me How to Yodel, where he does a fast yodel. He meets this woman in Switzerland and she teaches him how to yodel. And then there was Elton Britt who did a song called Chime Bells and used the fast yodel there. I remember being at a Roy Rogers movie as a child, Roy Rogers, “the King of the Cowboys” he was called. In the movie, his sidekick Gabby Hayes thought Roy was dead. And as he was sadly riding through a canyon, this beautiful yodel came out of the canyon—it was Roy! The first part of my own Praise Yodel models the Roy Rogers yodel. Then I go on to a late Jimmy Rodgers style, and then into my interpretation of an Elton Britt yodel.

Arbutus Tree One of the trees that I value on the Southern Coast is the arbutus tree. These trees, which the Americans call madrona, go as far north as Campbell River, perhaps a little further north, and they go south into Washington and Oregon. The trees are unique in that they are green-leafed throughout the year. These magnificent trees are related to the laurel. They have a smooth orangey-reddish-brown bark that dries and curls up and that they shed, revealing a pale green skin underneath. Which then hardens to become the next year’s bark. In the song I have the one standing like a sentinel on the point. For me it’s a meditative song, takes me back in imagination to Bill Sinclair’s knoll, the author, on Pender Harbour, where I used to spend time as a child, but also brings me to places here on Salt Spring Island and the Gulf Islands. The singer looks out on a ship, a small freighter perhaps, going round the point into the open ocean He thinks about those ground swells that are going to raise her bow and the” silver spray which is going to anoint her as she goes around”. He talks about the seagull mascots guiding the ship. And he says the ship is like him. He doesn’t want to stay tied up but wants to move on, move on with life, into the open ocean of life, to the new places of growth that the ocean can take one to.

Also: Ballad of Doc Darby, about a real life hero of the northern coast, around Bella Bella & cross cultural admiration; Ganges Waltz, a romance set in the heart of Salt Spring Island; and Cold Green Sea, the first coastal song written by Alan Moberg on north Vancouver Island.


Here are a few of the British Columbia places, plants and pastime, and some very special people, that listeners will find in Alan’s songs.

apple jacks *arbutus * salal * dogwood * crosscut saw * Billy Barker * Judge Bigbee * Doc Darby * Valdy * Walter Harris * Roy Rogers *Gabby Hayes * Jimmy Rodgers *John D. Loudermilk * Robert Bateman * yodel * leeward (vs windward) * tyee * skookumchuk * Chinook * Haida * Haida Gwaii * Gitxan * bow * southender * seiner * troller * Cariboo * Okanagan * Skeena * waltz * ballad *waltz*stampede * rodeo * barrel riding * brahma bulls * bronc, bronco * Order of Canada * pilings *high roller * The Sally Ann *skid row * knoll * inlet *sound *channel*harbour*cape *spit *bay *island *valley *strait *spring * point * canyon * creek * tidewater



Bookings/Media: Annie Palovcik, TK Media 250 537 9571
anniep@saltspring.com
***************************


PRESS RELEASE #1 of 2009
EVENT: NON-A CABARET (non-alcoholic) CONCERT & DANCE
With ALAN MOBERG & ED PEEKEEKOOT
Mahon Hall, Salt Spring Island, BC
February 21, Doors at 7:30
Tix: Acoustic Planet and Alan Moberg
Contact: Annie Palovcik anniep@saltspring.com 250 537 9571

Dust off your dancing shoes. And listen up! A concert and dance is happening at Mahon Hall with those two superb performers, Alan Moberg and Ed Peekeekoot teaming up again. Only a year ago, Alan and Ed were headliners at the Salt Spring Island Folk Club. And what a year it has been .

Alan Moberg was inducted into the BC Country Music Hall of Fame; he performed live on BC Global TV.. Ed Peekeekoot performed at the ceremonies for the Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards at the 6,000 seat MTS Centre in Winnipeg, filmed live for TV, with a CD nominated for Best Country CD. Meanwhile, they have played at many events throughout the province, often as solo performers, sometimes together. Recently they returned from the Cariboo, where they played to sold out houses in Williams Lake, 108 Mile House and 70 Mile House. It seems people only have to hear them once and they become fans for life.

A recent Aqua article described the “tsunami of appreciation” that always takes place when Moberg performs here on his Salt Spring Island home. Alan will be honoured at this year’s Williams Lake Stampede for the 40th anniversary of his Williams Lake Stampede Song. His latest CD, REMEMBER ME was #2 on the Folk/Roots/Blues chart at CHLY Nanaimo in December. Ed has been called “the 8th wonder of the music world” by the host of a syndicated radio show. He will perform in a concert as part of a Special filmed live by APTN TV in Whitehorse on National Aboriginal Day June.20 and broadcast simultaneously on TV, radio and internet.

And now something brand new! A “Non-A (non-alcoholic) Cabaret: Concert & Dance”. These two singers have chosen uplifting songs for these times, many from Alan’s CD FARTHER ALONG and tunes from Ed’s new CD DANCE TONIGHT! The event encourages the joy of music without alcohol. The power of music and dance help us to return to the simpler pleasures, shared with others.

With guitar, fiddle, banjo, and Native flute, Ed has been playing as a solo performer for dances up and down Vancouver Island. He provides additional accompaniment and rhythm electronically. There’s lots of hope and lots of rhythm in many of Alan’s original songs, but he also loves the old soft rock of the 60’s and 70’s, songs by Elvis Presley and Roy Orbison. Ed plays Jimmy Rodgers and Chuck Berry, Louisiana country boogie and hot old fiddle tunes from the Prairie dances of his youth. Together they get toes tapping. Soon we’re all celebrating. Ed says “At the end of the night, I’m a happy guy if you’ve got a big smile on your face and your feet hurt from dancing.”

Come early as seating is limited to provide dance space. Tickets at Acoustic Planet and from Alan himself, are $15, under 12-$5. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.for an 8:00 p.m. show.
Goodies and Non-A drinks by John of Ashlie’s Pantry. Bring an item for a food bank box if you can. Buy CDs at www.alanmoberg.com and www.peekeekoot.ca.
******************************
PRESS RELESE #2 OF 2009

PRESS RELEASE
> ALAN MOBERG AT HOLY TRINITY CHURCH, SOOKE
> Address: 1962 Murray Road, Sooke, BC
> June 6, 2009 7:00 PM
> Contact: Tom Lott, 250-642-3048, or tom.lott@shaw.ca
> Alan Moberg 250 538 8134
> alanmoberg@telus.net
>
>
> Alan Moberg is an award-winning West Coast Balladeer, from Salt Spring Island. He is country. He is folk.
> He is cowboy. He is gospel. He is Western
> Roots. He was inducted into the BC Country Music Hall of
> Fame in 2008.
>
> A "West Coast Stan Rogers", he is a simple but powerful
> performer, just a man and his guitar, but a big
> presence. Moberg's songs speak to the human
> condition, evoking notions of ongoing endurance, perseverance, travails and triumphs with simplicity and directness. He is honest and observant, his lyrics have courage and conviction. He celebrates the lives of ordinary men and women, giving them identity and dignity. He puts smiles on our faces and in our hearts.
>
> FARTHER ALONG, his 15th release, has this country/Folk
> artist acknowledging the powerful influences in his
> life. Alan Moberg has walked the long hard road of
> life and known when to ask for a helping hand. This uplifting collection of songs are ones we need to hear today, in these hard times: "Farther Along, we'll know all about it, Farther Along we'll understand why" goes the comfort of the old gospel tune. There's more comfort in such songs as Satisfied Mind: "Once I was winning in fortune and fame/ Had everything I dreamed of to get a start in life's game/ Then suddenly it happened, I lost every dime/ But I'm richer by far with a satisfied mind."
>
> The collection is also filled with old gems: the achingly beautiful "Scarlet Ribbons", "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain",and "Memories are Made of This". Moberg's melodic voice reaches into people's souls. Alan sings and listening hearts respond.
>
> And his 16th release , REMEMBER ME, released last year, has been receiving airplay coast to coast. Moberg will be playing at this year's Cottonwood Festival in Fort St. James, and is being honoured in June at this year's William's Lake Stampede (BC's oldest Rodeo) for the 40th anniversary of his Williams Lake Stampede song.
>
>
> But for fans in the Victoria area, Moberg will be performing Saturday, June 6, in a concert at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Sooke, at 7:00 p.m. Tickets available at the door, at Shoppers Drug Mart, Sooke
>or by contacting Tom or Marie at 250-642-3048
>
> Let his music uplift and enrich you
*********************************
PRESS RELEASE #3 2009

WILLIAMS LAKE STAMPEDE HONOURS ALAN MOBERG ON THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS WILLIAMS LAKE STAMPEDE SONG

Alan Moberg is known as “The Saltwater Cowboy” for his blended identity, a singer of the coast and a singer of BC’s interior ranch lands, a singer of its diverse people.

Alan Moberg is BC’s most authentic troubadour, a “West Coast Stan Rogers”, known for his bell-like tenor vocals, with 16 recordings to his name. His latest is called appropriately REMEMBER ME.. He is a simple but powerful performer, just a man and his guitar, but a big presence. Moberg’s songs speak to the human condition, evoking notions of ongoing endurance, perseverance, travails and triumphs with simplicity and directness. He celebrates the lives of ordinary men and women, giving them identity and dignity. He puts smiles on our faces and in our hearts. He gets toes tapping. Soon we’re all celebrating.

Alan Moberg was inducted into the BC Country Music Hall of Fame in 2008 for his extensive body of original and moving songs about his beloved British Columbia, with traditional western themes like bravery, innocence, survival and the cross-cultural friendships we share with First Nations people. Howard White of Harbour Publishing, says that “Moberg does for BC’s interior ranchland and coastal rainforest what Ian Tyson does for Alberta cow country…a moving portrayal of the west beyond the west by a virtuoso singer-songwriter.” “Alan is no doubt one of Canada’s best” – CIUT Radio Toronto. He will be honoured this year at the Williams Lake Stampede for the 40th anniversary of his Williams Lake Stampede Song.

Alan is a storyteller in song. "The Williams Lake Stampede" he says, "is a historic Stampede; it's been around for more than 80 years. At the time I wrote the song, people used to camp right beside the fair grounds. Some of them would even have come in a horse drawn covered wagon. So the song is a historical look at the Williams Lake Stampede. I use the towns in a rhythmic and rhyming way--"Sugar Cane, Horsefly, Kleena Kleene, Alkali, Prince George and Quesnel/Soda Creek, Cache Creek, Anahim, Bella Coola, Lillooet, you know darn well"--just to provide the sense that people came from all around to meet at the Stampede. A Stampede is a rodeo where different cowboy skills are tested, like saddle bronc riding and bull riding. But it was also a time when people got together when probably in those older days they wouldn't have seen each other all year because they were busy on their own ranches and distances between them were far. So it was a time to swap stories and enjoy being together".

Alan will be riding in the Grand Parade, opening the Rodeo on Saturday and Sunday, and will be performing with Ed Peekeekoot at the Let R Buck Saloon on Saturday (5:00-8:00), with a concert at the Gibraltar Room on Sunday, June 28. Ed, a brilliant multi-instrumentalist and humourist, is from the Ahtahkakoop Cree First Nation. He plays this year's Atlin Festival, in BC's far north, and both Alan and Ed are headline acts at the Cottonwood Festival in Fort St. James in July as well.

This folk song has promoted BCs cowboy culture round the world. It has been recorded by George Hamilton IV, and in 4-part harmony by Chor Leoni, Vancouver, (arr. Larry Nickel) on their Canadian Safari CD and performed by them for Bard on the Beach, directed by Diane Loomer. It has been recorded by the Calgary Boys Choir, and has also been recorded by the Vivaldi Chamber Choir, Vancouver and performed in Europe.

It has been performed by the Senior Band of Terry Fox Secondary School, Port Coquitlam, BC; it has been sung by many other choirs, such as the Maple Leaf Singers in the Massey Theatre, Vancouver, last year. Mark Madryga, BC Global TV's weatherman, who grew up in Kamloops listening to this song on the radio each year Stampede rolled around, calls this song "a classic" and has himself sung along to the song on his show a number of times. It has been used to promote German tourism to BC in a documentary film. It has aired on radio in Canada and the United States. And of course, Alan has sung it for the crowds at the Williams Lake Stampede many times before.

Elizabeth Twan, Williams Lake Stampede Association, BC, has in the past written:

"It is hard to believe Alan Moberg raised in a fishing family could have nailed the feeling, the flavor and atmosphere of a western event he had never even witnessed so absolutely perfectly. If ever there was a song that captured the image and spirit of a time or a place/this song had to be it. Three decades of listeners have never tired of the song, it is still one of his most requested wherever he performs. The young man from the coast had quite a gift of imagination to have done it so well."

******************

WILLIAMS LAKE STAMPEDE LYRICS
By Alan Moberg
Available on his NORTHERN LOVE CD at www.alanmoberg.com

Doodle, oodle, oodle, oodle, do, do, do, it’s the Williams Lake Stampede

Come along friends and see part of the last frontier with me
We’ll pack our gear and head for the rodeo
We’ll camp outside of town right next to the big fairground
We’re gonna see the sights at the Williams Lake Stampede

Hey they’re comin from
Sugar Cane, Horsefly, Kleena Kleene, Alkali, Prince George and Quesnel
Comin from
Soda Creek, Cache Creek, Anahim, Balla Coola, Lillooet, you know darn well
They’ll come from far and wide to have a little drink and watch the cowboys ride
Singin doodle oodle oodle oodle do do do at the Williams Lake Stampede

Those broncs from Mulvahill they’ll test a cowboy’s skill
We’ll watch them ride those mean old Brahma bulls
We’ll shake hands with old friends that we’re glad to see again
We’re gonna meet them all at the Williams Lake Stampede

There’s a pretty girl I know there, big brown eyes and long black hair
As the guitars play we’ll dance beneath the stars
But at noon when I awake I might feel my poor head ache
From the night before at the Williams Lake Stampede

Hey, they’re comin from
Kersley, South Fort, Lone Bute, Little Fort, the Gang Ranch and Hanceville
Comin from
Red Rock, Nicola, Kamloops, Savona, 100 Mile, yes they will
They’ll come from far and wide to have a little drink and watch the cowboys ride
Singin doodle oodle oodle oodle do do do at the Williams Lake Stampede

Hey, they’re comin from
Sugar Cane, Horsefly, Kleena Kleene, Prince George and Quesnel
Comin from
Soda Creek, Cache Creek, Anahim, Balla Coola, Lillooet, you know darn well
They’ll come from far and wide, bring all the kids, watch the cowboys ride
at the Williams Lake Stampede
Hey, we’re going to the Williams Lake Stampede
It’s the Williams Lake Stampede

**************************************
ALAN MOBERG SCHEDULE 2010

March 17, 2010, noon Pacific Time
and EVERY Wednesday
The Alan Moberg Show
at 107.9 fm Salt Spring Island
or www.cfsi-fm.com (NOT AIRING IN jULY)

April 11, 2010
Tsawout First Nations longhouse fundraiser
Fulford Hall, Salt Spring Island, BC

May 28, 2010
Tree House Cafe
Salt Spring Island, BC

Jun 27, 2010
Country Gospel Music SundayFest
2:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Providence Farm, Duncan, BC

July 1, 2010
10th Annual Canada Day Show and Shine
Salt Spring Island
Selected as THE Place to be on Canada Day by many Car Clubs from all over Vancouver Island
Alan is the headline act at 1:00 p.m. Other Music and Activities start at 9:00

July 25, 2010
Tree House Cafe
Salt Spring Island

Aug 1-2, 2010
BC Day Celebrations
Capital Festival
St. Ann's Academy, Victoria, BC

September 19, 2010
Salt Spring Island Fall Fair
Sunday Morning Gospel Sing
9:15 a.m.

September 19, 2010
Tree House Cafe
Salt Spring Island
7:00 p.m.

October 30, 2010
Sooke Folk Club
Holy Trinity Anglican Church
1962 Murray Road, Sooke, BC
8:00 p.m.

November 6, 2010
Country Gospel Music
St. Luke's Church, Saanich, BC
Cedar Hill/Cedar Hill Cross Road
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Tickets $15/$13, at 250 477 6741,
st.lukes@shaw.ca or at the door.

ALAN MOBERG SCHEDULE 2009

February 15, 2009
Duncan Garage Showroom
with Ed Peekeekoot and Steve Slade
afternoon show

February 21, 2009
“Non-A”-(non-alcoholic) Cabaret: Concert and Dance
Mahon Hall, Salt Spring Island, BC
With Ed Peekeekoot
Uplifting songs for these times from Alan’s “FARTHER ALONG”
and Tunes from Ed’s”DANCE TONIGHT”
Goodies & Non-A drinks by John, of Ashlie's Pantry.
Book a Non-A Cabaret in your community. anniep@saltspring.com

March 12-15, 2009,
Kamloops Cowboy Festival, BC
Gospel Songwriting Workshop
and Performances at the
Calvary Church
and at
Forsters Convention Centre
A return engagement

May 17 Tree House Cafe
Concerts Under the Stars
Salt Spring Island

May 21 Dusty Rose Pub,
70 Mile House
with Ed Peekeekoot

May 22, 2009
Grad Fundraiser Dinner and Show
Clinton Community Centre, BC

June 6, 2009
Concert
Trinity Anglican Church, Sooke, BC

June 14, 2009
Concerts Under the Stars
Tree House Cafe
Salt Spring Island, BC

June 19, 2009
Koksilah Elementary School
National Aboriginal Day Celebrations
Duncan, BC

June 27 & 28, 2009:
The Williams Lake Stampede
(40th year of Alan’s The Williams Lake Stampede Song)
Jun 27 Grand Parade,Opening of Saturday Rodeo,Honours & Song
5:00 - 8:00 Let R Buck Saloon, with Ed Peekeekoot
Jun 28 Opening of Saturday Rodeo, Honours & Song
Evening: Gibraltar Room Concert, with Ed Peekeekoot

July 1-11:45 a.m.
Langley Canada Days, BC
a return engagement

July 3,2009
Mission Envision Twilight Concerts
7:00 - 8:00 Heritage Park, Mission, BC

July 5, 2009
Concerts Under the Stars
Tree House Cafe
Salt Spring Island, BC

July 17-19, 2009
Cottonwood Festival
Fort St. James, BC

July 31, 2009
Harbour House Hotel
Salt Spring Island, BC

Aug 3, BC DAY
Capital Festival BC Day Celebrations
St. Ann's Academy, Victoria, BC

August 9 Tree House Cafe
Concerts Under the Stars
Salt Spring Island

August 21, 2009
Kamloops Parks Alive!
Kerry Park, Roots, Rhythm n Blues Night

August 22, 2009
Creekside Theatre 7:30 p.m.
Winfield, BC

August 23, 2009
Music by the River
Mara, BC

September 6, 2009
Private Party-afternoon
Old Fashioned Picnic

September 6, 2009
Harbour House Hotel
Dinner Show on patio
7:30 p.m.

September 13, 2009
Interview with Bill Nash on CFSI-fm 107.9 fm, Salt Spring Island, BC
The station has played Alan Moberg's music in heavy rotation since going on air this month.
Tell them how much you like hearing Alan Moberg's music: info@CFSI-fm.com

September 18, 6:30 p.m.
Western Night
Brittania Legion, Victoria

September 19, 2:00 p.m., 2009
Salt Spring Island Fall Fair

September 20, 9:15 a.m, 2009
Salt Spring Island Fall Fair

October 7, 2009
Music 'n Munch Concert Series
All Saints by the Sea Anglican Church
Salt Spring Island
a return engagement

October 23, 2009
Fundraiser for ‘Luke 15 House,’ a transition house
Hosted by Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson,
co-host of “The Daily” on Joy TV
Gracepoint Community Church
3487 King George Hwy, South Surrey
Doors open at 6:30 PM, buffet dinner at 7 PM.
604-531-5594 tickets $30.00

Dec 18, 5:00 p.m.
Country Christmas
Tree House Cafe, Salt Spring Island
Dec 20, 7:00 p.m.
Christmas Miracles and Northern Lights
St. Ann's Academy Auditorium Victoria
for the Capital Festival
--and Ed Peekeekoot

Dec 24, 2:00 p.m.
Festival of Kindness
McPherson Playhouse, Victoira
broadcast live on worldwide webcast
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Past performances of 2008

2008 begins with the Salt Spring Island Folk Club, headline act, Jan 28; 100 Mile House Cowboy Concert Feb 9; 70 Mile House Gospel Concert, and; Dusty Rose Pub Feb 10; Fisher Poet Festival, Astoria, Oregon, February 22-23; Kamloops Cowboy Festival, Mar 6-9; El Zocalo Cafe Eclectic Fridays, Mar 28, SSI; Heritage Place, SSI, April 20; Miracle Rally, Victoria, April 26-27; BC Rivermania kick-off, opening Gulf of Georgia Cannery, BC’s 150 Years, Steveston Market opening. Steveston, May 4; Maple Leaf Singers perform Alan’s “Williams Lake Stampede” at Massey Theatre, New Westminster ; May 31 Jun 1; Tree House Café (with Ed Peekeekoot) Jun 20; Fulford Hall, SSI, June 23; Black Dog Café, Lantzville, June 28; Langley Canada Days, June 30-July 1; July 2,Tree House Café Concerts Under the Stars, SSI, also July 20 with Ed Peekeekoot and August 6; Abbotsford Agrifair, Aug 2, 3, 4; Tree House Cafe Aug 6; Rainbow Corral, Wetaskiwin, AB, Aug 8; Concert in the Country, Millet, AB, Aug 9-10; Kelowna Festivals, Kerry Park Aug 22; Ashcroft Opera House, Aug 23; Music & Munch, SSI, Aug 27; Fall Fair, SSI, Sep 20-21; BCCMA Hall of Fame, Terry Fox Theatre, Port Coquitlam, Oct 24; Cowichan Theatre, Duncan, October 25; Cowichan Folk Guild Dinner and Chapel Concert Series, Providence Farm, Duncan Nov 7; 108 Mile Hills Health Ranch, Nov 14; Cowboy Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin, Williams Lake Nov 15; Dusty Rose Pub, 70 Mile House, Nov 16; St. Philips's Church, Lantzville, Nov 28

Bookings for Alan Moberg: Annie Palovcik anniep@saltspring.com
TK Media Salt Spring Island
250 537 9571
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