Matthias Bublath | Second Angle

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Jazz: Hammond Organ Jazz: Soul-Jazz Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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Second Angle

by Matthias Bublath

Hammond B3 driven funk, jazz, latin, samba and choro with the unusual instrumentation of vibes, sax, drums and organ.
Genre: Jazz: Hammond Organ
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Dump the Goose
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5:31 album only
2. Sweet Melody
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5:30 album only
3. B3 Choro
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3:55 album only
4. Africa
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8:30 album only
5. On the Road Again
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4:52 album only
6. Pocket
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7:24 album only
7. Douleur
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5:18 album only
8. Luiza
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6:29 album only
9. Humidifier
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7:50 album only
10. Silvershining
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4:26 album only
11. Second Angle
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3:37 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Organist Matthias Bublath fuses a variety of influences together on his brandnew release Second Angle, highlighting his involvement in Funk and Jazz as well as Cuban and Brazilian music. The tunes are melodic, sometimes even pop oriented and the focus is on the groove. feat: Obed Calvaire-drums, Tim Collins-vibes, Scott Bourgeois-sax, Matthias Bublath-hammond B3 organ.

Review in allabout jazz:
By John Barron

Since moving to New York City from Germany, pianist/organist Matthias Bublath has been making a name for himself as an in-demand sideman.
For Second Angle, his third release as a leader, Bublath stirs up a greasy set of organ-driven funk with the help of vibraphonist Tim Collins, saxophonist Scott Bourgeois and drummer Obed Calvaire.
With the exception of Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Luiza" the disc is comprised of Bublath's groovy original compositions, ranging from riff-based funkers like "Dump the Goose," "Pocket" and "Humidifier," to Afro- Cuban-influenced pieces like "B3 Choro" and "Africa." Bublath and company display impressive straight-ahead jazz chops on the hard swinging "On the Road Again" and the Horace Silver-sounding blues "Silver Shining."

Bublath is a forceful presence behind the organ, kicking strong bass lines, comping with a strong rhythmic drive and soloing with a feel-good fire. Organists will appreciate the stamina and originality displayed on the aforementioned "On the Road Again" and the title track, a simmering samba that brings an intense toe-tapping close to the session.

Collins and Bourgeois contribute edgy solos with just the right amount of lyricism to match Bublath's listener-friendly hooks. Calvaire proves a versatile drummer, shifting from one style to the next without missing a beat.

Second Angle is a wonderful showcase for this up-and-coming practitioner of the almighty Hammond. The disc begs for repeated listening.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=31490


Review by Dave Major

Second Angle is the third CD from New York-based organist/pianist and composer Matthias Bublath. His two previous releases saw him exploring two disparate sound-worlds individually: Latin music and jazz/funk. Here, with the help of vibraphonist Tim Collins, drummer Obed Calvaire, and saxophonist Scott Bourgeois, Bublath seeks to unify and consolidate these ideas rather than segregating them.
The unique instrumentation provides a wide range of possible colors and timbres, all of which are exploited fully by the group. Collins shares the accompaniment with the well-educated hands and feet of Bublath, and both are given equal time at the fore alongside Bourgeois. Calvaire's playing is without doubt exemplar; never overwhelming, always supportive, and never ceasing to challenge his band-mates in rhythmic discussion.

Confronted with such a wide spectrum of influences including funk, jazz, gospel and Afro Cuban, Bublath focuses in on the common core from each style: rhythm. Equally at home in swing time or straight meter, his phrasing and placement of both single lines and accompaniment seethes with rhythmic spice and precision. This is especially evident when supporting Bourgeois and Collins: organ and drums sound one and the same, yet in reality there is a constant, organic discourse of rhythmic figures and phrases. His solos are adventurous, but never at the cost of musicality, combining legato organ lines with ideas more commonly heard on piano (on previous outings he played both).

"Africa" provides a perfect example of the band's approach on this album. Beginning with a humble, jazz-infused melody, a loose and bustling accompaniment slowly creeps to the foreground acting as the backbone and catalyst for a exhilarating samba-esque jam. Soli figures intertwine with characterful improvisation and driving rhythmic ideas. This is a group which doesn't just shift gears jarringly in the middle of tracks. Rather, they drive more like an smooth automatic, slowly segueing between feels with a sense of growth which seem natural, and always compels.

The compositions are well executed and varied, from the bright and vivid "Dump The Goose," to the slow boiling "Sweet Melody" and the raunchy, infectious swing of "Silvershining." The forms used are well thought out and implemented, providing ample space for the band to stretch out without sounding repetitive. No track fizzles out either, with the endings all being strongly composed and definitely not afterthoughts. A fine example is "Humidifier," which is brought expertly to conclusion by Calvaire with a veritable master-class on drum breaks.

Second Angle provides everything expected from a jazz organ album: pedal bass, swirling swells and sizzling improvisation. Alongside all that, Matthias Bublah brings his exquisite faculty on the organ, a talented supporting cast, and a solid command of his music, creating an album deserving of recognition, praise and enjoyment.

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=31468


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