David Corter and Byron Estep | Aboriginal Bluegrass

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World: Australian Blues: Guitar Blues Moods: Featuring Guitar
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Aboriginal Bluegrass

by David Corter and Byron Estep

"A surprisingly harmonius blend of Steel and slide guitar with the Australian didgeridoo."
Genre: World: Australian
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Me and Ma's Pa
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6:41 $0.99
2. Swamp Thing
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5:04 $0.99
3. I'm Scared
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4:24 $0.99
4. Hillbillies on the Loose
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3:32 $0.99
5. Great White Walrus
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6:08 $0.99
6. Knopfler
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2:31 $0.99
7. It's Cashed
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5:53 $0.99
8. Oobarr
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1:39 $0.99
9. Love Song
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12:14 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
David Corter- Studied jazz guitar at Hartt School of Music in Hartford, Connecticut. In 1992, David moved to New York City to study guitar with renowned guitarist John Abercrombie. After hearing the Didgeridoo at an indigenous music concert, David became fascinated with the instruments rich sounds and rhythms, and added the didgeridoo to his musical vocabulary. Shortly thereafter, David was asked to perform on Jay Leno playing didgeridoo with off-broadway performance art group, Blue Man Group and subsequently began playing zither in the blue man band. In 1993, David traveled to Australia as a student of didgeridoos, living in the outback for six weeks with Wardaman tribal elder Billy Harney, where he learned about aboriginal culture, the didgeridoo and its tradition. In 1995, David released his first solo didgeridoo album, Didgeridoo Mania on the ARC music label based in the UK, blending the didgeridoo with western instruments to create a unique atmospheric and sonic palate. David played regularly in the New York scene with various groups and styles ranging from rock to avante garde jazz. In the summer of 1995, Byron Estep and David first collaborated for a performance art piece and realized the great potential and chemistry of the didgeridoo and bluegrass music. Byron and David began writing material and playing venues regularly in New York, which resulted in the creation of Aboriginal Bluegrass. In 1997 David was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic to build a didgeridoo-like percussion instrument for Krzysztof Penderecki's piece, Seven Gates of Jerusalem (Symphony No. 7). To the present day, David continues to collaborate with many musicians in the New York area, playing both guitar and didgeridoo, writes music for soundtracks and is a musician for Blue Man Group. In September of 2003, David will release a second solo didgeridoo album with ARC record label entitled Didgeridoo Mania II: Going Walkabout, featuring Byron Estep.

BYRON ESTEP- Before working with David Corter, Byron Estep released a CD of solo guitar pieces, "The First Night," and played with violinist Matthew Pierce as part of the Unsung String Duo (see www.unsungstringduo.com) . Byron has performed in venues ranging from the Wooster Group's Performing Garage to Carnegie Hall's Weill Recital Hall. He has been a featured guest on WNYC radio's new music program "New Sounds" and has been a guest speaker/performer at the Juilliard school. As a composer, he has written two feature length film scores: one for "You are Here" (Johnny Pictures, 2001) and one for "The Lifestyle" (Good Machine, 2000). He has also supplied music and score for a number of television projects including A&E Biography, Court TV, the Disney Channel and commercial spots for Forbes, FILA, DirectTV, and NasCar. He has also written music for two video games,"Unipong" and "FreeBowl," both made by Large Animal Games. As a sideman, he has performed or recorded as a guitarist or banjo player with numerous bands (including Sandy Bell, the Angstones, Blue Man Group, Katharine Blodget, Violet, Lucky, The Ranchhands, and many others). He is currently working as a music director for the hit shows Blue Man Group "Tubes" and "Live at Luxor" and is working on a new solo record set to be released sometime in early 2004.

Press reviews
About David Corter..."David Corter is quickly becoming one of [the didgeridoo's] biggest proponents."---The New York Daily News

About Byron Estep..."percussive comping, happening harmonies, and left of center vision..."---Guitar Player Magazine

About ABORIGINAL BLUEGRASS- "ABORIGINAL BLUEGRASS is a refreshing change from everything else on the market..." ---Dirty Linen Magazine


Reviews


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Tamara Turner, CD Baby


Where folk blues meet Australian didgeridoo. Sound like an odd combination? You'll be surprised by the complementary coupling of achin' and bluegrass-tinged Steel and slide guitar with the rumbling, timeless growl of the didgeridoo. Having studied in the bush with Wardaman tribe elder/ didgeridoo player, Bill Harney, David is clearly on the forefront of contemporary artists. Together with the pulsing emotion of the blues with the curious spaciousness the didgeridoo opens up, this album is one of those which once heard, will have you wondering what you ever did without it.

CD Baby


Where folk blues meet Australian didgeridoo. Sound like an odd combination? You'll be surprised by the complementary coupling of achin' and bluegrass-tinged Steel and slide guitar with the rumbling, timeless growl of the didgeridoo. Having studied in the bush with Wardaman tribe elder/ didgeridoo player, Bill Harney, David is clearly on the forefront of contemporary artists. Together with the pulsing emotion of the blues with the curious spaciousness the didgeridoo opens up, this album is one of those which once heard, will have you wondering what you ever did without it.

Jaahda

Awesome
At least David bothered to study didgeridoo with an australian aboriginal didj player. I have oh so often heard wadjellah (whitefellah) players who have competently and technically learned the didj. But what most whitefellahs don't know is that the didj tells a story. Listening to didj that does not understand this can be most disconcerting for sure. Well done David - a rare whitefellah didj player who knows how to tell a story.