Don Latarski | Take 5

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United States - Oregon

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Jazz: Cool Jazz Jazz: Chamber Jazz Moods: Featuring Guitar
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Take 5

by Don Latarski

This is my quirky version of this famous tune. I was imagining a New Orleans style rhythm section and this groove seemed to work out really well. Check out how the cowbell is hammering away on a "two" feel.
Genre: Jazz: Cool Jazz
Release Date: 

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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This is the second song in a series of cover tunes I'm releasing. The first song is Grenade, by Bruno Mars. My version of Take 5 uses multiple guitars along with drums and bass and is very much in sync with my Acoustica Funkus sound.

"Take Five" is a jazz piece written by Paul Desmond and performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet on their 1959 album Time Out. Recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studios in New York City on June 25, July 1, and August 18, 1959,[1] this piece became one of the group's best-known records, famous for its distinctive, catchy saxophone melody and use of the unusual quintuple (5/4) time, from which its name is derived.[2] While "Take Five" was not the first jazz composition to use this meter, it was one of the first in the United States to achieve mainstream significance, reaching #25 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard's Easy Listening survey, the precursor to today's Adult Contemporary charts, in 1961, two years after its initial release.


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