Dyson | Skyscraper

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Skyscraper

by Dyson

original Americana folk rock
Genre: Rock: Americana
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. Complex Story
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3:26 $0.99
2. Skyscraper
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5:15 $0.99
3. Oh Moon
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3:54 $0.99
4. Lick Our Wounds
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3:22 $0.99
5. Looking For Love
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4:29 $0.99
6. Moth
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3:17 $0.99
7. Till She Says
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3:48 $0.99
8. Like No One
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3:52 $0.99
9. Gone As Gone Can Be
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3:45 $0.99
10. Breath and Tongue
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3:03 $0.99
Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Review: ‘Skyscraper’ Towers Over Music Scene

Singer/songwriter Alan Dyson has arguably done more to promote local singers and songwriters than anyone else in Shreveport-Bossier through his early hosting of Songwriter Nights at venues like The Rude Bar, The Living Room, and the late, lamented Burning Spear and later showcases some of the area’s most promising performers at Soundstage 516 in downtown Shreveport.

Dyson has enlisted an army of those performers and musicians to
support him on his newest CD release Skyscraper. Area luminaries such
as legendary bassist Joe Osborn, Greg Williams (on backing vocals and
acoustic guitar), Scott Griffin (on classical guitar), Richard Harold
(on both electric and pedal steel guitars), trumpet virtuoso Don
“Dirty Redd” Crenshaw, and Dyson’s own daughter Alana L. Dyson on
backing vocals join Dyson on 10 striking, original compositions.

Alan Dyson wrote the music for all selections. He also wrote the
lyrics for half the selections with the exception of “Oh Moon” with
lyrics by Carol Bailey; “Looking For Love,” lyrics by Rumi: “Lick Our
Wounds” and “Gone As Gone Can Be” with lyrics by David Love Lewis; and daughter Alana L. Dyson contributing the lyrics for the CD closer,
“Breath And Tongue.”

Though Dyson is a dyed-in-the-wool Shreveporter, there is an air of
the English in these tracks, a gentle folk-pop sensibility something
like the restless ghost of Nick Drake sitting in with John Mayer (to
attempt a cross-generational reference), Dyson sings with the languid
ease and comfortable confidence of an afternoon picnic in the English
countryside.

There is a remarkable stylistic continuity throughout the CD,
considering the multiple sources of the lyrics. The production on
Skyscraper eschews the current trend to overproduce the heart out of
material. Dyson avoids these pitfalls by maintaining a relaxed
ambience throughout. His songs do not generally follow the textbook
“verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus” structure of “commercial”
songwriting, but the freedom of form and expression is part of the
charm of this appealing project.

One of the most striking elements of this CD is the ethereal and
innovative backing vocals performed by Alana L. Dyson, particularly on
“Skyscraper.”

“O Moon” changes rhythmic trains often enough to keep the listener as
off balance as the singer’s searching emotional uncertainty.

The slow and steady percussive shuffle of “Lick Our Wounds” propels
this cut into a funeral procession of healing. The subtle stand up
bass of Chris Allen adds an appropriate underpinning of elegiac
tragedy.

Of the accompanying players, standouts include John Peck and Henry
Edwards’ violin attacks floating in and out of melodies like gentle,
Celtic smoke and the fluid trumpeting of Don “Dirty Redd” Crenshaw,
one of the area’s most consistently impressive players.

Of the many outstanding cuts on this must-have CD, my favorite has to
be “Moth.” This ode to aching introspection will strum the
heartstrings of anyone who has endured “one more sleepless night” and
found themselves with “nothing left but to have some faith.” The song
has an almost country-like aura that is certainly reinforced by the
opening lines “One more bottle down, One more memory that I tried to
drown.” But though the singer is “on the floor,” he retains a fragile
hope that that the moth drawn too close to the flames can become a
Phoenix and rise again.

“Moth’s” lyrical and musical references into the country genre are
unexpectedly offset by the trumpet of “Redd Crenshaw” Where one might
reasonably expect a crying steel guitar to take the lead break in this
remarkable piece, Dyson has inserted a trumpet solo by Crenshaw that
manages to convey being “on the floor” while ending with the fragile
strand of hope we all would like to hold on to. Crenshaw’s
contribution to this cut is both subtle and daring and a reminder of
what a truly astonishing player he can be. The economy of his notes is
tastefully targeted to echo the singer’s own feelings.

Skyscraper was recorded at Shreveport’s world-class recording facility
Sandbox Studio. Sandbox is owned by Darren Osborn, who produced the CD
along with Greg Williams. Osborn and Denise Greenhaw engineered, and
Dyson himself served as executive producer.

The next time you’re shopping for a new CD, opt for the original and
get one of the most enthralling releases on the market, Alan Dyson’s
Skyscraper. Yeah, the major labels have the money to promote the heck
out of often carbon-copy, manufactured artists that will fade quickly
in the bright light of history. Alan Dyson’s work is anything but
cookie-cutter and deserves to be heard not just by the local faithful,
but by everyone, everywhere who relishes the artistry of the brave
singer/songwriter who carves his own path through the underbrush of
life and love unafraid to acknowledge and share their own
insecurities, doubts, and hopes. Skyscraper is a towering achievement
from an artist who is obviously in love with the creative process and
has courageously chosen to “opt for original.”
Skyscraper ad other Alan Dyson product can be purchased through the
websites www.cdbaby.com and www.dysonfinearts.blogspot.com

Bravo! - - Karl Hasten
As reviewed for Forum Magazine - Shreveport/Bossier Louisiana


Reviews


to write a review

Karl Hasten

Album review for Forum Magazine
Review: ‘Skyscraper’ Towers Over Music Scene

Singer/songwriter Alan Dyson has arguably done more to promote local singers and songwriters than anyone else in Shreveport-Bossier through his early hosting of Songwriter Nights at venues like The Rude Bar, The Living Room, and the late, lamented Burning Spear and later showcases some of the area’s most promising performers at Soundstage 516 in downtown
Shreveport.

Dyson has enlisted an army of those performers and musicians to
support him on his newest CD release Skyscraper. Area luminaries such
as legendary bassist Joe Osborn, Greg Williams (on backing vocals and
acoustic guitar), Scott Griffin (on classical guitar), Richard Harold
(on both electric and pedal steel guitars), trumpet virtuoso Don
“Dirty Redd” Crenshaw, and Dyson’s own daughter Alana L. Dyson on
backing vocals join Dyson on 10 striking, original compositions.

Alan Dyson wrote the music for all selections. He also wrote the
lyrics for half the selections with the exception of “Oh Moon” with
lyrics by Carol Bailey; “Looking For Love,” lyrics by Rumi: “Lick Our
Wounds” and “Gone As Gone Can Be” with lyrics by David Love Lewis; and daughter Alana L. Dyson contributing the lyrics for the CD closer,
“Breath And Tongue.”

Though Dyson is a dyed-in-the-wool Shreveporter, there is an air of
the English in these tracks, a gentle folk-pop sensibility something
like the restless ghost of Nick Drake sitting in with John Mayer (to
attempt a cross-generational reference), Dyson sings with the languid
ease and comfortable confidence of an afternoon picnic in the English
countryside.

There is a remarkable stylistic continuity throughout the CD,
considering the multiple sources of the lyrics. The production on
Skyscraper eschews the current trend to overproduce the heart out of
material. Dyson avoids these pitfalls by maintaining a relaxed
ambience throughout. His songs do not generally follow the textbook
“verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus” structure of “commercial”
songwriting, but the freedom of form and expression is part of the
charm of this appealing project.

One of the most striking elements of this CD is the ethereal and
innovative backing vocals performed by Alana L. Dyson, particularly on
“Skyscraper.”

“O Moon” changes rhythmic trains often enough to keep the listener as
off balance as the singer’s searching emotional uncertainty.

The slow and steady percussive shuffle of “Lick Our Wounds” propels
this cut into a funeral procession of healing. The subtle stand up
bass of Chris Allen adds an appropriate underpinning of elegiac
tragedy.

Of the accompanying players, standouts include John Peck and Henry
Edwards’ violin attacks floating in and out of melodies like gentle,
Celtic smoke and the fluid trumpeting of Don “Dirty Redd” Crenshaw,
one of the area’s most consistently impressive players.

Of the many outstanding cuts on this must-have CD, my favorite has to
be “Moth.” This ode to aching introspection will strum the
heartstrings of anyone who has endured “one more sleepless night” and
found themselves with “nothing left but to have some faith.” The song
has an almost country-like aura that is certainly reinforced by the
opening lines “One more bottle down, One more memory that I tried to
drown.” But though the singer is “on the floor,” he retains a fragile
hope that that the moth drawn too close to the flames can become a
Phoenix and rise again.

“Moth’s” lyrical and musical references into the country genre are
unexpectedly offset by the trumpet of “Redd Crenshaw” Where one might
reasonably expect a crying steel guitar to take the lead break in this
remarkable piece, Dyson has inserted a trumpet solo by Crenshaw that
manages to convey being “on the floor” while ending with the fragile
strand of hope we all would like to hold on to. Crenshaw’s
contribution to this cut is both subtle and daring and a reminder of
what a truly astonishing player he can be. The economy of his notes is
tastefully targeted to echo the singer’s own feelings.

Skyscraper was recorded at Shreveport’s world-class recording facility
Sandbox Studio. Sandbox is owned by Darren Osborn, who produced the CD
along with Greg Williams. Osborn and Denise Greenhaw engineered, and
Dyson himself served as executive producer.

The next time you’re shopping for a new CD, opt for the original and
get one of the most enthralling releases on the market, Alan Dyson’s
Skyscraper. Yeah, the major labels have the money to promote the heck
out of often carbon-copy, manufactured artists that will fade quickly
in the bright light of history. Alan Dyson’s work is anything but
cookie-cutter and deserves to be heard not just by the local faithful,
but by everyone, everywhere who relishes the artistry of the brave
singer/songwriter who carves his own path through the underbrush of
life and love unafraid to acknowledge and share their own
insecurities, doubts, and hopes. Skyscraper is a towering achievement
from an artist who is obviously in love with the creative process and
has courageously chosen to “opt for original.”
Skyscraper ad other Alan Dyson product can be purchased through the
websites www.cdbaby.com and www.dysonfinearts.blogspot.com

Bravo! - - Karl Hasten