Erik Jekabson | Anti-Mass

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Jazz: Chamber Jazz Classical: New Music Ensemble Moods: Instrumental
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Anti-Mass

by Erik Jekabson

A variety of styles (from avante-garde to New Orleans jazz to atmospheric soundscapes) played by a true chamber-jazz group: trumpet, saxophone, violin, viola, bass and percussion.
Genre: Jazz: Chamber Jazz
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Silence
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2:39 album only
2. Strontium
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3:03 album only
3. Park Stroll
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4:26 album only
4. A New Beginning
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7:25 album only
5. Interlude 1
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1:18 album only
6. Anti-Mass
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15:41 album only
7. Interlude 2
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1:08 album only
8. Portrait of Miss D
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4:26 album only
9. The Cello Player
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3:06 album only
10. To Be Deyoung Again
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6:34 album only
11. Afternoon On the Sea, Monhegan
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2:59 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Ever since I got serious about writing music, I've loved to stroll
through museums and imagine what the artwork would sound like.
Usually, when staring at a piece that really interests me, the music
that comes into my head contains fresh new textures, colors, melodies,
harmonies and dynamics; music I never would have come up with without
the artwork's inspiration. The compositions on this CD are these
sounds. They’re inspired by pieces in the permanent collection of the
DeYoung Museum of San Francisco, and by aspects of the museum itself,
such as its architecture, its surroundings, and its history of
supporting artists. The music was composed for my String-tet, an
ensemble of trumpet, tenor sax, violin, viola, bass and percussion.
This instrumentation gives the String-tet great flexibility to go in
many different musical directions, flexibility that I needed to
interpret the great variety of artwork at the DeYoung Museum (not to
mention interludes of strolling around looking for the next
inspiration) Not only did I write the music for these instruments, but
I wrote it with these specific players in mind, and it was great
hearing the music "come to life" in their skilled hands. My hope is
that this music conjures up new ideas, images, and colors in the head
of YOU, the listener, and that you may be similarly inspired as I was,
to try to create something new and different.


Reviews


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Nicholas F. Mondello

An Inspired, Enjoyable "Museum" Tour
The nexus where visual art meets and gives birth to musical art is a historically robust junction. The stunning silence of the visual when inspiring composer’s pen and musicians’ tools has fueled listeners’ imaginations for centuries both in
the classical world and more recently in jazz. This intriguing recording - musical observations of and inspirations from San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum - follows
in that tradition.

Bay Area trumpeter/composer Erik Jekabson, here fronting a perfectly unique and appropriately timbered ensemble of tenor saxophone, three strings and rhythm (called a “String-tet”) delivers a vibrant, deeply reflective guided tour – and a fascinating album. The musical textures offered are intelligently performed without a hint of forced interpretation. And, the sound colors performed by the Sting-tet pulse, drone, and leap in a marvelous display a musical craftsmanship.

Performer Jekabson has a beautiful trumpet/flugelhorn sound and plenty of technical arrows in his musical quiver to deliver a performance where textures and colors are paramount. When he’s improvising, one can discern that Jekobson has done his listening well; there are times he channels, but does not cop, Mssrs. Davis, Hubbard and Marsalis. The museum’s artwork and architecture have deeply inspired Jekabson as writer, too. Unlike the late Frank Zappa, whose brilliant art-inspired writing occasionally wandered into areas of dissonant tonality, Jekabson’s pen yields highly approachable sonorities.

Kudos are in order to fine tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens whose sound and flowing ribbon-like lines meld with all the beauty that his stringed cohorts offer. The addition of Smith Dobson’s vibraphone adds a liquid coolness to the gorgeous colorings of violin, viola and bass. His set-and-cymbal work is all appropriately textured. Sans piano, the entire rhythm section blends well with the frontline and the plucks and lyricism of the violin/viola tandem of Mads Tolling and Charith Premawardhana is superb. Bassist John Witala is a cooperative teammate driving and supporting all enthusiastically.

“Anti-Mass” is intelligent, highly involving listening. It’s stimulating, thought-provoking fun - and definitely worth the price of admission. Take a stroll through with ears and mind’s eyes open.

Nicholas F. Mondello

An Inspired, Enjoyable "Museum" Tour
The nexus where visual art meets and gives birth to musical art is a historically robust junction. The stunning silence of the visual when inspiring composer’s pen and musicians’ tools has fueled listeners’ imaginations for centuries both in
the classical world and more recently in jazz. This intriguing recording - musical observations of and inspirations from San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum - follows
in that tradition.

Bay Area trumpeter/composer Erik Jekabson, here fronting a perfectly unique and appropriately timbered ensemble of tenor saxophone, three strings and rhythm (called a “String-tet”) delivers a vibrant, deeply reflective guided tour – and a fascinating album. The musical textures offered are intelligently performed without a hint of forced interpretation. And, the sound colors performed by the Sting-tet pulse, drone, and leap in a marvelous display a musical craftsmanship.

Performer Jekabson has a beautiful trumpet/flugelhorn sound and plenty of technical arrows in his musical quiver to deliver a performance where textures and colors are paramount. When he’s improvising, one can discern that Jekobson has done his listening well; there are times he channels, but does not cop, Mssrs. Davis, Hubbard and Marsalis. The museum’s artwork and architecture have deeply inspired Jekabson as writer, too. Unlike the late Frank Zappa, whose brilliant art-inspired writing occasionally wandered into areas of dissonant tonality, Jekabson’s pen yields highly approachable sonorities.

Kudos are in order to fine tenor saxophonist Dayna Stephens whose sound and flowing ribbon-like lines meld with all the beauty that his stringed cohorts offer. The addition of Smith Dobson’s vibraphone adds a liquid coolness to the gorgeous colorings of violin, viola and bass. His set-and-cymbal work is all appropriately textured. Sans piano, the entire rhythm section blends well with the frontline and the plucks and lyricism of the violin/viola tandem of Mads Tolling and Charith Premawardhana is superb. Bassist John Witala is a cooperative teammate driving and supporting all enthusiastically.

“Anti-Mass” is intelligent, highly involving listening. It’s stimulating, thought-provoking fun - and definitely worth the price of admission. Take a stroll through with ears and mind’s eyes open.