Fernando | Dreams of the Sun and Sky

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Rock: Sadcore Folk: Modern Folk Moods: Mood: Dreamy
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Dreams of the Sun and Sky

by Fernando

Voted one of the top Ten albums released in 2001 by The Oregonian. This atmospheric folk rock album was recorded almost entirely live in Producer/multi-instrumentalist Mike Coykendall's( M.Ward, Richmond Fontaine)home in Portland, Oregon in 2001.
Genre: Rock: Sadcore
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. The Jackal
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4:47 album only
2. Climb
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3:59 album only
3. Away
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4:05 album only
4. White Light
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2:43 album only
5. Blue Room
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3:06 album only
6. The Fly
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2:44 album only
7. Only One For Me
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4:23 album only
8. Greenfield
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4:11 album only
9. Killer Waits
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4:13 album only
10. Hold On
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4:35 album only
11. Fade Out
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4:32 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This album of roots- and Latin-flavored dream pop is hard to shake. Fernando Viciconte has a pleasant rasp of a voice that can come off like Wilco's Jeff Tweedy or even John Lennon at times. (The latter particularly on "Away.") The songcraft is gorgeous, varied, and highly original, however, whether it be the way the plaintive Spanish trumpet sails in just as Fernando purrs "…clarion call" on "The Jackal," the driving indie rock of "Blue Room," or the stark, cascading beauty of "White Light." There are also plenty of Beatlesque flourishes, while "Killer Awaits" showcases Fernando's country-folk roots. This is a stunningly pretty album by a criminally overlooked Portland, OR, artist. Dreams of the Sun and Sky is packed with gorgeous mystery.

Eric Hage-
All Music Guide

Dreams Of The Sun And Sky Fernando Viciconte may not be a household name, but the Portland, Oregon singer has the dynamic persona of a certified rock star. Drawing on hard rock, folk, pop and punk influences in addition to a more traditional Spanish makeup, Fernando's music has attracted a swarm of industry heavy-hitters - including majors like Interscope and Columbia. Jaded by major label bureaucracy, he shocked everyone by releasing his latest effort, Dreams Of The Sun And Sky, on his own Domingo Records. The labels hounding Fernando will be surprised by the sound of Dreams as well - rather than rehashing the bluesy hard rock sound of 1999's Old Man Motel, he crafted a folk-pop record that strays into pretty melancholia. Though most tracks rely heavily on an acoustic guitar formula with only sparse piano and horn accompaniment, it's Viciconte's somber vocal melodies that steal the show. Occasionally the band's panache for light pop tunes surfaces (the horn-peppered "Blue Room"), but stripped-down tracks like "The Jackal" and "Killer Waits" dominate the album with an engaging authenticity. ¡Viva la independencia! - Alex Naidus:

CMJ New Music Report Issue: 731 - Sep 10, 2001

More customer and press reviews below.


Reviews


to write a review

CD Baby


I REALLY like this mellow husky quiet sad singer songwriter. Like Elliot Smith, but even more weary if that's possible. Lennon's saddest post-Beatles songs. Wonderful recording. Is this Cowboy Junkies' depressed brother? Gritty, honest and with a slight rasp to his pipes, Fernando can swoop from the low-down agonized depths of despair to shouts of sheer unbridled joy in a heartbeat: brimstone to treacle in a single gulp.

Jim

Moody, introspective rock at its best!
I love this album and it's on my extended rotation. The majority of the songs elicit an emotional response on the listener, which is the real clarion call of great music! I do think the material is stretched a bit thin and some not-so-stellar songs made their way - thus the 4. Buy this when you can!

Entertainment Today

review by Adam Mckibbin
For all the many divergent roads as music has taken, at the end of the day I’m still a big sucker for a lone guy or gal with a guitar. The singer-songwriter isn’t exactly an endangered species, and it’s usually pretty easy to find a likeable one with easy acoustics and intimate lyrics. The trick, of course, is finding someone who stands out from the throng.

Fernando Viciconte — d.b.a. as simply Fernando — definitely stands out. A big part of his appeal is his ability — and insistence — to transcend genre. Before this release, his last projects were a rootsy Spanish album and a noisy guitar rock album. Fernando’s latest, the unfortunately titled Dreams of the Sun and Sky, finds him walking down a much more subdued path of introspective folk-pop.

The big guitar sound is mostly shelved, and its few appearances feel out of place. The crunchy end of “White Light” seems overly indulgent, and the heavy punch of “Greenfield” falls flat compared to its neighbors. The rest of Dreams — minus the shoddy art design — is an unmitigated success.

The album’s mood changes as quickly as your own. There are moments of brave optimism, like the triumphant ballad “Only One For Me,” in which Fernando gravelly asserts, “And now there won’t be no crying.” It’s hard not to compare the piano-driven “Hold On” to a Lennon song (the mid-song swirling build feels like a salute to “A Day In The Life”). “You will always have each other, nothing else exists,” Fernando sings. But even here there is a sense of sadness since the source of happiness is decidedly detached from the singer himself. There is no “we” or “us” in this tale.

There is an Everyman quality to Fernando’s vocals that is reminiscient of Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy. And, like Tweedy, Fernando is comfortable piloting both the lively tracks and the languishing ones, from the infectious rocker “Blue Room” to the chilling harmonica retreat of “Fade Out,” the album’s sorrowful closer. This versatility-and unpredictability-help make Dreams an easy recommendation.


Alex Naidus

CMJ Review
FERNANDO: Dreams Of The Sun And Sky


Fernando Viciconte may not be a household name, but the Portland, Oregon singer has the dynamic persona of a certified rock star. Drawing on hard rock, folk, pop and punk influences in addition to a more traditional Spanish makeup, Fernando's music has attracted a swarm of industry heavy-hitters - including majors like Interscope and Columbia. Jaded by major label bureaucracy, he shocked everyone by releasing his latest effort, Dreams Of The Sun And Sky, on his own Domingo Records. The labels hounding Fernando will be surprised by the sound of Dreams as well - rather than rehashing the bluesy hard rock sound of 1999's Old Man Motel, he crafted a folk-pop record that strays into pretty melancholia. Though most tracks rely heavily on an acoustic guitar formula with only sparse piano and horn accompaniment, it's Viciconte's somber vocal melodies that steal the show. Occasionally the band's panache for light pop tunes surfaces (the horn-peppered "Blue Room"), but stripped-down tracks like "The Jackal" and "Killer Waits" dominate the album with an engaging authenticity. ¡Viva la independencia!
- Alex Naidus: CMJ New Music Report Issue: 731 - Sep 10, 2001



David Greenberger

Pulse Magazine Review-Tower Records
Pulse! Magazine | October 2001 | Sections | On Record | Fernando


FERNANDO
Dreams of the Sun and Sky ( Domingo )

This second CD from Fernando (last name: Viciconte) has the feel of a song cycle. The instrumentation is both varied and subdued, favoring acoustic instruments, but also wisely and skillfully employing their electric brethren. Over the core of guitars, keyboards and a rhythm section, there are sympathetically arranged flourishes of trumpet, string trio, lap steel and other tonally vibrant sounds. Fernando's singing is rich and expressive, equally capable of giving confident focus to a moody ballad or to a propulsive little rocker ("Blue Room" pumps along with infectious verve). The sequencing of the songs masterfully links them into a continuous and sustained feel throughout the set's 11 songs. Though the album title suggests the buoyancy of a summer day, from the opening chords of the first song, "The Jackal," they are suffused with the layered mystery of dawn and dusk.

By David Greenberger






Musicmission

music website review
Fernando – Dreams of the Sun and Sky

Fernando has created one of those albums that you can listen to over and over again and it never tires. I’m not saying that Dreams of the Sun and Sky is a perfect album but it is one that doesn’t irritate or grate on ones nerves. It’s a mellow ride any way you look at it and it sooths the soul as you go down Fernando’s road. He really knows how to do the heartbreaking indie rock thing. There is all the emotion necessary in his voice as well as brilliant minimal arrangements. His songs really do ring with a characteristic that seem like a fresh look at life after everyone important has let you down, including your best friend. Take Fernando for a spin and try to cheer him up.
(Domingo 2001)
Try if you like –
John Lennon, Elliott Smith





Erik Hage

AMG review
AMG EXPERT REVIEW: This album of roots- and Latin-flavored dream pop is hard to shake. Fernando Viciconte has a pleasant rasp of a voice that can come off like Wilco's Jeff Tweedy or even ohn Lennon at times. (The latter particularly on "Away.") The songcraft is gorgeous, varied, and highly original, however, whether it be the way the plaintive Spanish trumpet sails in just as Fernando purrs "…clarion call" on "The Jackal," the driving indie rock of "Blue Room" or the stark, cascading beauty of "White Light." There are also plenty of Beatlesque flourishes, while "Killer Awaits" showcases Fernando's country-folk roots. This is a stunningly pretty album by a criminally overlooked Portland, Oregon artist. Dreams of the Sun and Sky is packed with gorgeous mystery. — Erik Hage


Domingo Records

Marty Hughley Pick
Dreams of the Sun and Sky was picked by the Oregonian(Oregons leading newspaper) as on of the top 10 CD's released in the United States in 2001.

Impact Press

Dreams Review
Fernando • Dreams of the Sun and Sky • Domingo Records • The music on this disc has a mellow folk-pop, bluesy feeling to it. Full of soulful, dark emotions that instill a rage of optimism when it's all done, this album is great from beginning to end. This effort displays musical diversity by Fernando while playing electric and acoustic guitars, percussion, lead and background vocals. From the opening track "The Jackal"to "Blue Room,"the vocals are smooth and stand out among the many instruments and sounds in each track. The lyrics are a perfect compliment to the mood setting. A number of musicians contributed with guitar, cello, violin, clarinet and upright bass sounds to add to an atmospheric follow up for Fernando. This release doesn't have the "shattering rock attack"sound that his debut Old Man Motel consisted of but the delivery is just as strong, only from a different angle.





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Responses to this messages:


Laura T. Lynch of Kweevak.com

A Magical mystical experience!
Diversity of instrumentation adds to the very rich sounds found through Fernando's latest release. Fernando merges R&B, world, eclectic Spanish and rock to create a dazzling collection of songs. His reflective lyrics about life, love and dreams are haunting and compelling. This CD has a broad range of elements, moods and deep tones. I enjoyed the entire CD but especially liked the first five tracks. 'The Jackal' has a mysterious dark feel. 'The Climb' is poignant. 'Away' is Lennonesque and beautifully accented with the lap steel. 'White Light' has a variety of sounds including some wonderful clarinet playing. 'Blue Room' has a steady beat that just flows.