Foster McGinty | Peach Red

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Cream Jimi Hendrix Sly & The Family Stone

Album Links
FM official website FM on myspace

More Artists From
United States - NY - New York City

Other Genres You Will Love
Rock: Psychedelic Rock: Retro-Rock Moods: Mood: Upbeat
There are no items in your wishlist.

Peach Red

by Foster McGinty

“My heart belongs to the music, and music comes from my heart and soul,” says Foster McGinty, a Memphis-born and Missouri-raised singer/songwriter who now calls New York City home.
Genre: Rock: Psychedelic
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Can\'t Help But Shine
Share this song!
X
3:59 $0.99
2. 10 Moons
Share this song!
X
3:47 $0.99
3. Hard Jelly
Share this song!
X
3:25 $0.99
4. Dreamcatcher
Share this song!
X
3:35 $0.99
5. Turquoise
Share this song!
X
4:31 $0.99
6. Burning Bee Hive
Share this song!
X
4:40 $0.99
7. Circus Mind
Share this song!
X
3:02 $0.99
8. Darlyn Giver
Share this song!
X
3:45 $0.99
9. War Machine!
Share this song!
X
3:04 $0.99
10. My Time of Uncertainty
Share this song!
X
4:28 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Bless his Cosmic Soul “You seem natural, so effortless…Can’t help but shine.”— Foster McGinty

With his rolling, curly brown hair and intensely dark eyes framing a hippie-vintage-rocker look, Foster McGinty shines in his life’s role as both a ‘knowing nod’ to the wah-wah drenched days of old and a hopeful, promising look forward into the future of Rock & Roll.

Foster’s deep rock roots stretch from small town midwestern beginnings all the way to California and back to The Big Apple, where he now calls home. Long before Foster was a Guitar God to-be, he started by “diggin’ out my Dad’s guitars in the basement, and bending the strings at five years old.” Born in Memphis and raised in Missouri, Foster grew up in a family where several members played instruments and sang, but it wasn’t until seventh grade that he ended up in the family music room and started “fiddling around with the guitar.” “I think I actually wrote a song. I had no idea what I was doing, and it just gave me an incredible feeling,” he says of his childhood initiation to the world of Rock & Roll singer/songwriters. Foster’s new ‘feeling’ was an all-consuming love for classic rock music and old blues that washed over him like a river overflowing its banks. Hendrix, Clapton, Dylan, and old blues legends like Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters… all the greats filled Foster’s head, heart and soul.

It wasn’t long after he stumbled headlong into music as his life’s path that friends and family within Foster’s circle joked that he was the skinny white-boy reincarnated spirit of Jimi Hendrix and Cream’s love child. Foster’s teen years were spent rehearsing for countless hours under the roof of his parent’s tin barn with numerous bands, but Foster says he “always preferred spending my time writing my own music and traveling down a path of musical expression.” Foster co-wrote songs with his best friend in their junior and high school years but disbanded shortly after their first recording. Foster’s dedication to music was on a much higher level, and he knew a change was coming.

I Must Be On My Way

“To grow into the performer and songwriter I wanted to become, I had to leave my small town roots,” Foster says. “I moved to St. Louis, formed a few different bands. I was still writing the music and having others do the lyrics and singing, but mainly we wasted time.” Wasting time must have been what inspired Foster to head back home to Missouri less than a year later. Once settled back home, Foster’s love for the artistry of Jimi Hendrix blossomed.

In his apartment on the banks of the Mississippi River, Foster started to examine the guitar on a whole new level. “I started exploring beyond songwriting,” he says. “I wanted to be able to express myself on the spot.” With so much musical passion and exploratory energy building inside him, Foster grew restless again and headed for California, where he recorded with a few groups and played lead guitar for the first time. Foster says California didn’t turn out to be his musical oasis, but it did serve as the launching point of his vision as an artist. After severing ties with his songwriter friend, Foster began writing his own lyrics, which led Foster to start singing−something he never thought he would do. Seven months later, Cape Girardeau beckoned him home once again. Foster recorded a host of songs within one year and formed a trio, playing mostly in Memphis.

I Hope I Make It Home Alive

It was good to be back home again as the old song goes, but change−another life altering musical change−was again on his mind. Foster uprooted himself and hopped on a plane bound for New York City in October, 2006. The goal: Making his dream come true to play his original retro-style rock in the world’s biggest city. New York would serve as the launch pad for a bigger career in music. Foster quickly formed another rock trio and recorded the E.P. State of Mind Music Box as they performed all over Manhattan.

Foster just completed his debut full-length cd, Peach Red, a disc full of funky, hard driving, bluesy vintage-style rock propelled by Foster’s smoking lead guitar, David Butler’s expert drumming and James Brown-like bass lines from bassist Trifon Dimitrov.

While DNA tests may never conclusively prove that Hendrix did indeed reproduce with Clapton’s old trio, it can be said that Foster McGinty is a name—and a sound—that you’re sure to want to hear again. Foster is one of those deeply introspective, sultry Rock & Roll genius types who prefers to let his music do most of his communicating. Foster’s voice has a mellow, soulful and majestic quality while possessing that perfect combination of ‘heart-on-your-sleeve’ vulnerability, childlike simplicity, and sexy Bad Boy swagger mastered by the greats of classic rock. Music, for Foster McGinty, is as much a part of him as breathing and thinking.

“My heart belongs to the music, and music comes from my heart and soul.”


Reviews


to write a review

SANNE (Susanne Beckert), Denmark.

Foster McGinty- heir to the land of music from the sixties and seventies? YES !!
I`m so happy to get this opportunity to give you MY review of Foster McGinty +musicians on this latest CD "Peach Red"! By coindence I stumbled over the music and some videos on YouTube,and I was so surprised and happy,discovering that there WAS somebody today,that loved the music and spirit from the great bands from the time of "Peace and Love"; not only that,but somebody that could transform that spirit and music into his on style,complete with his own lyrics and composing his own music!! Namely: FOSTER McGINTY !!

We better all remember that name; it will be on everybodys lips soon!! How can I believe that? Simple: FOSTER is so hardworking, engaged and in love with music; has come a long way uptill now; he fills a deep space in the music world and on top of all that, he is also very dedicated to his fans!!
His album "Peach Red" has it all !! FOSTER`s voice is mosly very "mellow" and calm,but chances all the time,corresponding perfectly with the music, which are divine inspired and with some really fantastic solos,which make you think of a kindred soul of Hendrix!
I can only say, that you miss out of something import happening today in the musicworld, if you cheat yourself of the greatness and warmth of this album!!
My advice: Start with the videos on "YouTube";get more info;then I know you will end here, hungry to buy "Peach Red"!!

Susanne Beckert (SANNE)

Foster McGinty- heir to the land of music from the sixties and seventies?