Fred Anderson | Staying In the Game

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Jazz: Avant-Garde Jazz Jazz: Free Jazz Moods: Type: Improvisational
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Staying In the Game

by Fred Anderson

Tenor saxophone veteran Fred Anderson has been a fixture in free jazz since his co-founding of the AACM, and he enlists bassist Harrison Bankhead and drummer Tim Daisy on this intimate trio showcase Staying In the Game.
Genre: Jazz: Avant-Garde Jazz
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Sunday Afternoon
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24:37 album only
2. The Elephant and the Bee
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8:21 album only
3. 60 Degrees in November
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10:50 album only
4. Wandering
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6:39 album only
5. Springing Winter
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6:13 album only
6. Changes and Bodies and Tones
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10:21 album only
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
From an All About Jazz review by Henry Smith:

Opening with the lengthy "Sunday Afternoon," things start with a jump as Daisy and Bankhead lie a solid backing to Anderson's snaking and relaxed melody line that would fit nicely into Monk's compositional output. Never veering too far from its groundwork, the piece is a subtle and professionally performed excursion that well maintains its interest throughout its twenty four minutes, changing tempos, loosening and tightening its grasp, and exploring the outer bounds of its harmonic capacities.

Following that piece is the equally exhilarating "The Elephant and the Bee." With Bankhead bowing a thick and richly colored bass line, Anderson recites a dirge-like theme, his gutteral tone at once pulling from John Coltrane's spiritual weight, Ornette Coleman's rhythmic dexterity, and Gato Barbieri's diverse tonal range.

Given such a small group, the unit is able to truly move as one, gliding along with immediate reaction to one another. "60 Degrees in November" and the aptly titled "Wandering" both display this ability, the previous driving itself with consistent momentum while the latter, opening with an uncredited thumb piano, meanders along gently, nearly dancing its way along the floor.

"Springing Winter" and the closing "Changes and Bodies and Tones" finish the album with an impressive one-two punch. While the fifth track presents a nearly militaristic melody line, bending it in Aylerian fashion until it is abstracted and angular, the closer, beginning with an impressive solo by Daisy that mounts tension until Bankhead's dramatic bowed lines slash about, scraping their way across the backbeat until Anderson's soothing, broad horn emerges once more. It's a fitting entrance for an artist who, at over 80 years of age, continues to broaden his approach and push himself forward with unrelenting passion.


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