Glenn Diamond | Nuggets of Gold (The Legend of the Lost Dutchman's Mine)

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
George Strait Johnny Cash Keith Urban

More Artists From
United States - United States

Other Genres You Will Love
Country: Western Country: Americana Moods: Solo Male Artist
There are no items in your wishlist.

Nuggets of Gold (The Legend of the Lost Dutchman's Mine)

by Glenn Diamond

Nuggets of Gold is the true story of the Legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine.
Genre: Country: Western
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Nuggets of Gold (The Legend of the Lost Dutchman's Mine)
Share this song!
X
7:12 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Mine -- The video can be found at:

http://www.youtube.com/glenndiamond

By: Victor H Royer

My new song – "Nuggets of Gold" – performed by Glenn Diamond, and released on the Starlight Express label (available from Cdbaby.com, iTunes, Amazon and Napster), is the true story of the Legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine. The lyrics of the song are based in fact, inasmuch as there are facts about this legend, or any legend for that matter.

But like every legend of the Old West, in America, there is a lot of truth behind it, and many actual and verifiable historical facts. This is not just “another tall tale” from the Old West. This legend actually has legs, and – in fact – that Gold Mine did exist, and still does exist. If – that is – you can find it!

The legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Mine is the most famous of all the stories about fabulous lost gold mines in Arizona and New Mexico.

The story first began to be told publicly in a somewhat roundabout way. It all actually began with the story of lost treasure of the old Aztec Empire, the Gold of the Incas, which was supposedly hidden somewhere in a cave system in Arizona.

At some time in the 19th century, two men from the Midwest, along with an old Indian Chief, supposedly found themselves in an Arizona cave filled with treasure. About 100 hundred years later, Mr. R.G. Babcock received a letter, describing that first-hand account of the lost gold of the Aztec Empire. Mr. Babcock is the author of the 1990 book: “A Search For Aztec Treasure” / Chicomoztoc / (The Seven Caves), in which he details this search, and the story behind it.

Although at first glance these two stories seem unrelated, there are similarities, not only in the timeline, but more specifically in the location, and the commonality of the characters, and how the story began to be told. If these were truly two distinct stories, one of the old buried Aztec Gold being “stored” somewhere in caves in Arizona, and the other story of the crusty old “Dutchman” gold miner, then these two “tales” would be very different in their telling, especially over time. But they are not. In many ways, and places, they are very similar.

In the first place, they both tell of “lost gold” in caves in Arizona, in a place called: “Superstition Mountains.” These mountains have been a place of mystery and legends since only the Pima Indians lived in Arizona. In the 19th century, these same mountains, and the old Pima Indian cave dwellings and settlements (then already abandoned), became the stronghold of the Apaches. From there they raided the countryside, and particularly the white miners who came for gold.

As with all legends, we have some truth, and some “oral history”, which as we all know can somewhat be enhanced over time. But what is truly strange about the Legend of the Lost Dutchman’s mine, and the earlier legends of the Lost Aztec Gold hidden in Arizona caves, is that these two tales all seem to have been told quite the same way. And, on top of that, there are actual historical facts to support that.

In many of these stories about the Lost Goldmine, the Apache “curse” protects the sacred burial ground and the treasures of the Indians, which include the Lost Dutchman’s Mine. This curse can be traced back to the early 16th century, when Spanish priests were building missions in what is now known as Arizona and New Mexico. The Indians helped them mine gold, some of which was sent back to the King of Spain. In the late 18th century, the Jesuits were ordered out of Mexico. Some people believe they hid away their records of mines, treasures and ore deposits.

During the 1840’s the Mexican Peralta family developed some rich gold mines in the Superstition Mountains. According to the legend, in 1848 a large party was ambushed by Apaches. Only one or two Peralta family members escaped into Mexico. There is indeed evidence of skirmishes between the Spanish and the Apaches at the area that is known today as “the Massacre Grounds”, where remnants of mining equipment, old weapons, gear and a pack train have been discovered.

The legend says that the Peraltas buried their rich mines with rocks to hide their treasures. Numerous maps have surfaced, but the men who claimed to have found the Peralta mine were unable to return to it, because of all sort of troubles, calamities and disasters, all adding to the lore of the Curse of the Superstitions.

And here is where the stories get interesting, and intertwined.

In the 1870’s, Jacob Waltz aka “the Dutchman” (but actually a German) is said to have located the “lost” gold mine, with some help from a Peralta family descendant. Waltz and his partner Jacob Weiser hid some caches of gold in the vicinity of Weaver’s Needle. Weiser was killed by the Apaches, or by Waltz, who then moved to Phoenix, where he died in 1891. He described the location of the mine to Julia Thomas, but neither she nor other treasure seekers were able to find the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine. A lot of them have met with foul play, death – or even the Curse of the Superstition Mountains.

From that moment on, The Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine (also known by many similar names) was complete, and fully entered folklore. The mine was always reported as being a very rich gold mine hidden somewhere in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, east of Phoenix, Arizona in the United States. Today the land is designated as a Wilderness Area, and mining is restricted by Title 16, chapter 23 paragraph 1133 of the United States Code.

The mine is named after German immigrant Jacob Waltz (“Dutchman” as was a common expression at the time, although completely inaccurate, because it was just an American slang term for “German,” misunderstood by the Americans from the German word for “Deutsch”, which means a person who is a “German”, from the country of Germany).

As far as we can tell from history, it seems that people have been looking for the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine since at least 1892. Over the years some experts estimate that about 8,000 people each year make some effort to locate the Lost Dutchman’s mine.

According to many versions of the tale, the mine is either cursed, or protected by enigmatic guardians who wish to keep the mine’s location a secret. And that’s why no one has found it. Except, of course, for the two men who did. As told in my song: “Nuggets of Gold”.

===================

Here are the lyrics:


Nuggets of Gold

(The Legend of the Lost Dutchman’s Mine)

A stranger from the Llano Escañado
One day came to town all alone,
He said that he almost died out there
Back beyond the canyon of the sun,

He said that he found the Dutchman’s gold
The legend he said was all true,
Then he sat down on the ground and died
Holding in his hands nuggets of gold;

Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found nuggets of gold,
Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found the Dutchman’s gold;

From that day many others came to town
Looking for the lost Dutchman’s mine,
Asking what had happened to that man
Did anyone know the canyon of the sun,

Many were the men who came and tried
Tried to follow the markers in the sand,
For 40 years they tried but no one knew
Where the old man found those nuggets of gold;

Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found nuggets of gold,
Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found the Dutchman’s gold;

Then one day a stranger came to say
The legend of the Dutchman’s mine is true,
He said that he just came from that place
Just beyond the canyon of the sun,

He said that he almost died out there
Just the other side of that hill,
Then he sat down on the ground and died
Holding in his hands nuggets of gold;

Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found nuggets of gold,
Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
He said that he found the Dutchman’s gold;


Over the next 60 years they still came
Looking for the legend of that mine,
Where was the other side of that hill
And how do you find the canyon of the sun?

Still today they come and try to find
The way that it seems the others found,
But so far only two men who have died
Ever saw those lost nuggets of gold;

Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
They said that they found nuggets of gold,
Nuggets of Gold, Nuggets of Gold,
They said that they found the Dutchman’s gold;


They said that they found the Dutchman’s gold.

© Copyright 2010 by Victor H Royer. All rights reserved. Property of GSR Holdings Inc., Las Vegas, NV, USA.


Reviews


to write a review