Gregg August Sextet | One Peace

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Jazz: Post-Bop Jazz: Latin Jazz Moods: Featuring Bass
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One Peace

by Gregg August Sextet

Creative modern jazz with a broad variety of influences.
Genre: Jazz: Post-Bop
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Hand to Mouth
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6:19 $0.99
2. Nastissimo
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5:18 $0.99
3. One for Louis
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5:16 $0.99
4. Modal Tune
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6:58 $0.99
5. Contradiction
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2:36 $0.99
6. Sixth Finger
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6:15 $0.99
7. In Dedication
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8:33 $0.99
8. Change of Course
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8:03 $0.99
9. Crescent Mood
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5:29 $0.99
10. Cascading
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4:21 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“One Peace” is the second recording by bassist Gregg August and again the work is made up entirely of his own compositions. It’s the culmination of his sextet having played steadily together in New York City over the last couple of years. Other than the last track which adds bass clarinet, Gregg sticks with the same size ensemble throughout on this album rather than utilizing the various line ups as he did on his first recording “Late August”. His aim was to work as much as possible with the same musicians, composing material for their specific personalities, as well as allowing for more freedom of expression and group interaction. One track in particular, “Change of Course”, was designed expressly to challenge the soloist and ensemble to play off of each other. There’s a simple theme (a tone row- all of the 12 notes played without repetition) followed by “free blowing”- no form, no chords. Then the soloist plays a phrase which cues the band to join in, followed by the soloist stating the original theme in whichever tempo he chooses at the moment. Obviously this can only be executed by a group of players that has spent a lot of time together on the bandstand. Two of the musicians on “One Peace” carry over from Gregg's first CD- Myron Walden (alto and soprano saxophones) and John Bailey (trumpet). The rest of the band is made up of some of the best young talent on the scene today: Stacy Dillard (tenor), Yosvany Terry (tenor, shekeré), Luis Perdomo (piano), EJ Strickland (drums), Mike Lowenstern (bass clarinet).


Gregg August has been professionally active in New York for the last ten years in several diverse musical circles. Originally a drummer, Gregg switched to bass in college and then went on to receive degrees from Juilliard and The Eastman School. Having played two seasons in Barcelona, Spain as Principal bass with La Orchesta Ciutat de Barcelona, he returned to New York City where he became active in both the jazz and latin scenes.

He has played with Ray Barretto, Ornette Coleman, Paquito D’Rivera and the Chico O’Farrill Afro Cuban Jazz Orchestra, among others. He maintains his ties to classical music as Assistant Principal bass in the Brooklyn Philharmonic, as well as frequent collaborations as both composer and performer with the experimental group Bang on a Can.


Reviews


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William Agnew

One Peace
This is about as good a balance between composition/arrangement and solo space as you could hope to find. Overall, this is real good stuff. An oddity is that even though two good tenor soloists alternate between the various tracks, no tenor solo appears until track 6. All the soloists are very good, the compositions are quite original, and the arrangements interesting and enjoyable without cramping the style of the soloists.