I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House | Put Here To Bleed

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Country: Country Rock Rock: Roots Rock Moods: Type: Political
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Put Here To Bleed

by I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House

Political-minded rock 'n' roll with a country appeal, I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House taking on George W. Bush, the government, gun-toting NRA president Charlton Heston, and rock star Courtney Taylor (of the Dandy Warhols).
Genre: Country: Country Rock
Release Date: 

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1. Twerp I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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3:17 $0.99
2. Dear Mr. Heston I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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3:32 $0.99
3. American Fuck Machine I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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4:24 $0.99
4. La I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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4:38 $0.99
5. In the Mud I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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3:26 $0.99
6. Hayward, CA '76 I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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6:04 $0.99
7. Gone As They Go I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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3:16 $0.99
8. Things That Fail I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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4:53 $0.99
9. The Ballad of Courtney Taylor I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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3:25 $0.99
10. To Be Good I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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5:02 $0.99
11. Sixsixfive I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House
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6:43 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Taking the bull by the horn, I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House's sophomore full-length, "Put Here To Bleed", pulls no punches when discussing the current state of affairs in the U.S. Speaking out against George W. Bush ("Twerp", "American Fuck Machine"), gun-totin' NRA President Charlton Heston ("Dear Mr. Heston"), and the American government at large ("Things That Fail"). "Put Here To Bleed" is a political live wire, the much-needed protest record for those that want to speak out against Bush's war.

With a name like I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House, the band puts it all on the line - and they deliver. When front man Mike Damron sings, he lets it all out. In "Dear Mr. Heston" Damron relives the tragedy of his youngest brother accidentally getting shot by another brother in the kitchen of their Las Vegas home. "Josh said I know where mama keeps the gun/ she won't even know that it's gone/ I took my class and I got my license/ now my little brother will never know the love of a girl/ and he'll never drink a cold one/ and he'll never see another sunrise/ and he'll never damn sure, damn sure fire that gun," Damron sings with chilling conviction.

The song soon erupts back into the chorus: "Dear Mr. Heston, if you ever saw a 12-year-old boy's brain splattered on a kitchen wall, well you'd hang your head in shame, you rifle totin' whore. Cold-blooded, old-blooded, sick-ass man".

Then in "Things That Fail" Damron's anti-war sentiments strike a chord, making you weep as he speaks for us all: "Dubya Dubya three is a man on a mission, he's got a war to sell, these are things that fail".

The Dandy Warhols' Courtney Taylor soon gets his ego put in check on "The Ballad of Courtney Taylor": "All you pretty women, best do what I say. If I see one green M&M, there is gonna be hell to pay. What's that shit, salami? On my deli try! I'm gonna leak it to the Willamette Week that I'm bi-sexual or gay, 'cause I'm a rockstar," snarls Damron, mocking the holier-than-thou attitude possessed by Taylor and other like-minded rock stars.

"Put Here To Bleed" is an intense, ass-kicking ride through I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House's punk-minded, alt-country, gritty rock 'n' roll vision.

Key Selling Points:

-Constantly touring throughout 2003
-Politically-minded, controversial record that should - and will - strike a chord with like-minded groups and individuals.
-In-store play copies available

Label Contact:
Alex Steininger @ In Music We Trust
15213 SE Bevington Avenue / Portland, Oregon 97267
V: 503-557-9661 / F: 503-650-8365
alex@inmusicwetrust.com / www.inmusicwetrust.com


Reviews


to write a review

musicemissions


Mike Damron's bluesy/country outfit is back for another fight. I Can Like Any Sonofabitch In The House is like a ballroom brawl that never ends. It seems like only a couple of months ago that I was reviewing their debut, Creepy Little Noises. Now with their sophomore album out on In Music We Trust again, Damron has honed this style of raucous rock to his own art-form. Mike states that his influences range from Steve Earle to Lynyrd Skynyrd to Thin Lizzy. This all adds up to an energetic set of music and that's what Sonofabitch delivers on his new album. He takes a political approach on some of the songs like "Dear Mr. Heston", an anti-gun song. It really is Mike's voice that makes his band stand out from others. His vocals are twangier than Merle Haggard's and rougher than Joe Cocker's. At times, Sonofabitch is totally rocking like Jackyl and other times Mike has his foot totally in the country sound. It's a refreshing album that isn't all that unique but there is so much heart in Damron's music that it more than makes up for it.

J C


I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In The House • Put Here To Bleed • In Music We Trust Records • From the get go this disc jams out. Heavy on that classic blues and rock sound with scruffy vocals and a harmonica addition that balances the rawness with ease. This album is fierce and crisp all the way through and is an excellent attempt at taking rock back to the forefront of popular music. Lyrics lean towards the tragic in "Dear Mr. Heston" about vocalist Mike D's brother shooting his other brother and then the government on "The Ballad Of Courtney Taylor" and "American Fuck Machine" which are about the corruption and inequality from those in power. The tight sound wound between these guys fit in with late night drinking bashes. "Gone As They Go," "Sixsixfive" and "La" all show off lyrical diversity and take certain risks not taken by many groups out there right now. (JC)

Michael Toland


Portland's roots rock thugs in I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House put one of last year's most unexpected pleasures out last year with the debut album Creepy Little Noises, and now they're back with Put Here to Bleed. Head SOB Mike D. (who did time with that notorious combo the 101st Airborne before his stint as a rock & roll miscreant) unleashes another strong set of songs from his working class psyche, full of spit and bile - indeed, he's even angrier than before. "Dear Mr. Heston" takes the NRA head to task with righteous fury ("If you ever saw a 12-year-old boy's brains splattered on a kitchen wall/Well you'd hang your head in shame") and little subtlety ("You rifle totin' whore"); other targets of his disgust include popular alternative rockers ("The Ballad of Courtney Taylor," a less-than-flattering look at the Dandy Warhols bandleader), blind patriotism ("American Fuck Machine"), an apparently personal vendetta ("Twerp") and, well, pretty much everything about the American system ("Things That Fail"). He also finds the wherewithal to roll his characters around in the mire of self-loathing in "Hayward, CA '76," "Sixsixfive" and "La," all of which are unnervingly affecting despite a complete lack of sentimentality. "Gone As They Go" and "To Be Good," while hardly uplifting, interject a surprising tenderness into the broiling anger, just enough the keep D. from seeming like a sourpuss. The band backs up his plainspoken treatises with tough, no-nonsense rock & roll that maximizes his rootsy melodies while slathering them with enough gravel to ruin an undercarriage. Speaking of gravel, D. seems to prefer it to mouthwash; his shredded throat gives each line an authenticity that prettier singers would kill for. This is one songwriter who sings what he means and means what he sings, and this is a band as long on honesty as it is on talent. Put Here to Bleed was put here to wail.

Hillary

My hole life just fell apart and this band is the only thing that is holding me
Laying in my bed, driving in my car ICLASOB blairing my my ear your words give me faith and stop some of the tears.

Tamara Turner, CD Baby


If Americana or Roots rock ruled the world, this band would be the
authority. Appropriately named, "I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the
House," while being one of the longer entries in the Webster
dictionary, can conveniently be found between to the words "ache" and
"nasty." With the "I'm not taking no crap from anyone" vibe, dressed
in tattered cowboy boots and with a box of cigs within reach at all
times, this band won't leave you wanting for aural stimulus. They
have got the balls of all out hard rock and punk, the twangy
gun-tootin' grit of Country and the spankin' delivery of the blues.
Any way you see it, this album is one to covet.

Nada Mucho


Put Here to Bleed - indicates I Can Lick Any SOB is one of only two country-tinged rock bands out there that matter (the other being The Drive-By Truckers, of course).

N8


To make it short and sweet...
This is one rawkin' disc that doesn't seem to want to come out of my stereo!
Goes down smoooth and hits you hard like fine backwoods moonshine.

Jason Heller


Nineteenth-century colonialists spoke patronizingly of the Noble Savage. Today we have the Enlightened Redneck: Mike Damron, singer/ guitarist of the Oregon quintet I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House. Scrapping the sad-sack sensitivity of the Gram Parsons/Townes Van Zandt school of country-rock, Damron and his boys rip out a bluesier, ballsier brand of wistful jangle and rustic twang. But don't let the alt country tag send you packing: Put Here to Bleed leaks buckets of smarts, distortion and pure punk soul. In the album's anti-gun hootenanny "Dear Mr. Heston," the morally senile NRA president is informed: "If you ever saw a twelve-year-old boy's brains/Splattered on a kitchen wall/Well you'd hang your head in shame/You rifle totin' whore/Cold-blooded, old-blooded, sick-ass man." The burly, bearded Damron comes across like Michael Moore fronting Lynyrd Skynyrd. And not unlike Moore, Damron is no ivory-tower liberal; he speaks of firsthand pain in first-person terms, a thinking man trapped in a body -- not to mention a whole culture -- of testosterone-pumped machismo. With plainspoken grace and a Texas drawl, he tenderly growls his way through lines like "I hate everything/Kings and being poor/Guns and burnin' crosses and evils knockin' at my door" and "I hope we're angels/Not just put on earth to bleed, not just a cancer/Not just disease, not just anger." The music is tucked somewhere between Steve Earle and the Afghan Whigs, peppered with stubbly riffs and bleak, black heartbreak. In fact, "Things That Fail" steals the distinct drumbeat from the intro of the Whigs' anthem "Gentlemen," and the disc's opening cut "Twerp" could have been a hidden track at the end of Earle's Transcendental Blues. Other songs, like "American Fuck Machine" and "Sixsixfive," are meaty slabs of outrage and open-chord bashing, while "To be Good" is the album's mournful, gut-chilling ballad. Most alt-country today is made by hipster dilettantes and fake-hick opportunists, but I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House sticks out like a rusty nail, pricking egos and deflating pretension. And, in Damron, the whole genre has acquired a new songwriter of conscience, intelligence and brusque -- even savage -- honesty

Shaggy

Yes!
I haven't heard music like this since 1978.
The Clash meets Aerosmith at Stiv Bator's house!
Next time Natalie Maines wants to mouth off, she should just do a cover of one of these songs. It would mean a lot more.

CD Baby


If Americana or Roots rock ruled the world, this band would be the authority. Appropriately named, "I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House," while being one of the longer entries in the Webster dictionary, can conveniently be found between to the words "ache" and "nasty." With the "I'm not taking no crap from anyone" vibe, dressed in tattered cowboy boots and with a box of cigs within reach at all times, this band won't leave you wanting for aural stimulus. They have got the balls of all out hard rock and punk, the twangy gun-tootin' grit of Country and the spankin' delivery of the blues. Any way you see it, this album is one to covet.
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