Jarrad Powell | Stonehouse Songs

Go To Artist Page

Album Links
Present Sounds Recordings

More Artists From
United States - Washington

Other Genres You Will Love
Avant Garde: Classical Avant-Garde World: Gamelan Moods: Type: Vocal
There are no items in your wishlist.

Stonehouse Songs

by Jarrad Powell

Vocal music from another planet. Gamelan instruments, and powerful lush textures.
Genre: Avant Garde: Classical Avant-Garde
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. The Rain
Share this song!
X
3:30 $0.99
2. Buffalo Solo
Share this song!
X
7:38 $0.99
3. Rapt Away to Darkness
Share this song!
X
14:47 $0.99
4. Mountains and Waters
Share this song!
X
7:30 $0.99
5. Real Emptiness Is a Tranquil Sea
Share this song!
X
2:13 $0.99
6. When the Red Sun Bites the Mountain
Share this song!
X
2:24 $0.99
7. When Mountains Are Nourished By Rain
Share this song!
X
2:20 $0.99
8. To Get to the End the Absolute End
Share this song!
X
2:03 $0.99
9. Beyond a Door I Made but Don't Close
Share this song!
X
2:17 $0.99
10. Around the Summit I Only See Pines
Share this song!
X
2:20 $0.99
11. Listen
Share this song!
X
2:51 $0.99
12. Goro-goro
Share this song!
X
3:38 $0.99
13. Fragments and Ecstacies
Share this song!
X
14:09 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
STONEHOUSE SONGS

Compositions by Jarrad Powell
Vocals by Jessika Kenney

Instrumentation
Jessika Kenney (vocals, sruti box), Eyvind Kang (viola), Adam Diller (clarinet), Annie Lewandowski (accordion), Tom Swafford (violin), Jarrad Powell (metaharmonium; spoken voice on Listen), Stephen Fandrich (vocal on Buffalo Solo)

Gamelan instrumentation
Jesse Snyder (gender), Julija Gelazis (siter), Michelle Doiron (slenthem), Stephanie Helm (slenthem), Jarrad Powell (gambang & kendhang), Stephen Fandrich (ketuk & kenong), Stephen Parris (kempul & gong)


CONTENTS

1) The Rain 3:31
2) Buffalo Solo 7:46
3) Rapt away to Darkness 14:45
4) Mountains and Waters 7:38

Stonehouse Songs
5) real emptiness is a tranquil sea 2:12
6) when the red sun bites the mountain 2:25
7) when mountains are nourished by rain 2:20
8) to get to the end the absolute end 2:02
9) beyond a door I made but don’t close 2:17
10) around the summit I only see pines 2:15
11) Listen 2:50
12) Goro-goro 3:36
13) Fragments and Ecstacies 13:36

TOTAL DURATION 67:13

Buffalo Solo
vocals: Jessika Kenney & Stephen Fandrich
Fragments and Ectasies
voice, gamelan, and viola
Goro-goro
voice, viola, and sruti box
The Rain
vocal solo
Listen
vocals: Jessika Kenney & Jarrad Powell
Mountains and Waters
voice and gamelan
Rapt away to Darkness
voice, violin, clarinet, and accordion
Stonehouse Songs
voice and metaharmonium

Powell and Kenney have worked in a close collaboration for many years, both in Gamelan Pacifica and in a variety of other performance projects. The vocal compositions featured on this CD were composed, in most cases, specifically for Kenney. She, in turn, brings her own musical expression and eclectic vocal background to help create the unique genre of this music.

Recorded at Hanzsek Audio, Seattle, Engineer: Troy Swanson
Fragments and Ecstacies recorded at Litho, Seattlw, Engineer: Mel Dettmer
Mixed by Jarrad Powell
Mastering in Seattle at Master Works by Barry Corliss
Produced by Jarrad Powell for Present Sounds Recordings
Cover art and design by Renate Golkl

All compositions © by Jarrad Powell
2006 Present Sounds Recordings. All rights reserved.
www.presentsounds.com

Special thanks to Gamelan Pacifica and Cornish College of the Arts

Jessika Kenney is an unusual singer involved in the deep layers of music of the past through interpreting, learning, and creating music. She lives on Vashon Island in the Puget Sound.

"I met Jarrad Powell in 1995 at Cornish. At the time I was studying vocal improvisation with Jay Clayton. When he invited me to sing with Gamelan Pacifica, and to become a part of his work with Molly (Mary Sheldon Scott), I did not quite realize what lay in store. Soon enough I was immersed in microtonally shifting modes, incanting mythopoetic imagery, cutting sheet aluminum on a table saw, and departing for Indonesia alone in 1997. There I lived and studied with two great pesindhen (Javanese vocalists), Nyi Mujinah in the Baluwarti Kraton and Nyi Supadmi of STSI Solo. The way I have experienced singing Jarrad’s music has partially been a form of integrating musical and philosophical knowledge that I was exposed to at this time. The elements of singing are so numerous and awe-inspiring, and I am so grateful for this music as a place to touch these elements in some way. Words, melodious spirits, centripetal forces…."

Jarrad Powell was born in Montana. His early musical training began around age 5 with piano lessons from his mother. He later also studied percussion and guitar. In college he studied Philosophy, Religious Studies, English, and Music and received his Masters in Music Composition from Mills College. He has worked as a dance accompanist, bicycle mechanic, ski instructor, music teacher, performer, and college professor. He has been composing, performing, and teaching in Seattle for more than twenty years. His compositions have been performed internationally and include numerous pieces for voice, gamelan, various western and non-western instruments, and electro-acoustic music. His work also includes numerous cross-cultural collaborations, particularly with Indonesian artists, and he has been directing Gamelan Pacifica since the early 1980’s. He has collaborated with noted choreographer Mary Sheldon Scott for more than a decade through their company Scott/Powell Performance. He is currently a Professor at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle.

If you wish to create music you must first learn what music is, not an easy task, since so many of its secrets are clothed in mystery. The singing of Jessika Kenney has been for me a window into some of those secrets. I am eternally grateful to her for somehow understanding the music of my heart and for bringing her own incredible creative insight to the realization of this music.

The metaharmonium is actually an electronic instrument. I call it metaharmonium because its sound and function remind me of the harmonium, an instrument often used in Indian music to accompany vocals in a heterophonic manner. I use the metaharmonium in a similar way. The instrument is actually based on clarinet samples and has the advantage over the normal harmonium of a wider range, the ability to effect timbral change that allows it to imitate somewhat the phonemic inflection of the voice, and the ability vary pitch microtonally.

Texts:

Stonehouse Songs from The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse, translated by Red Pine, published by Empty Bowl, 1986. Used by permission of Empty Bowl Press.
Rapt Away to Darkness from “Pythagorean Silence” by Susan Howe, from EUROPE OF TRUST, copyright © 1990 by Susan Howe. Used by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp.
Mountains and Waters from Mountains and Waters Sutra by Zen Master Dogen; translated by Arnold Kotler and Kazuaki Tanahashi; published in Moon in a Dewdrop, Northpoint Press, 1985. Used by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC
Fragments and Ecstacies from Rumi: Fragments and Ecstacies; translated by Daniel Liebert, originally published by Source Books, 1981, second publishing by Omega Publications, 1999, used by permission of Omega Publications, Inc.
The Rain: “I am rain” from Praises of the Bantu Kings; versions of Bantu self-praises by Jerome Rothenberg, from literal translations by Jacques Chileya Chiwale, published in Alcheringa, Issue One, Fall 1970, and “The rain of the white valley” from June Rain by W.S.Merwin, published in The Compass Flower, Atheneum, 1980, © 1977 by W.S. Merwin, permssion of the Wylie Agency.
Goro-goro and Listen by Goenawan Mohamad from the libretto for the opera Kali. Used by permission of the author.
Buffalo Solo by Jarrad Powell and Jessika Kenney.


Present Sounds Recordings
www.presentsounds.com


Reviews


to write a review