Jorge Isaac | Sin Descanso

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Classical: Contemporary Avant Garde: Electro-Acoustic Moods: Instrumental
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Sin Descanso

by Jorge Isaac

Recorder virtuoso Jorge Isaac performs the exciting work 'Sin Descanso' by Roderik de Man.
Genre: Classical: Contemporary
Release Date: 

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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Sin descanso” for blockflutes and cd(tape) was composed at the request of Jorge Isaac and is dedicated to him. This work was commissioned by the Amsterdam Fonds voor de Kunst.
One who has experienced the pleasure of attending a concert by Jorge Isaac, will understand why the piece was named “Sin descanso”, which means “without rest. He is the type of musician who tirelessly searches for new possibilities and extensions of his instrumental domain. These musicians are of great importance to composers, because they stimulate them to investigate the possibilities and positively exploit the characteristics of these instruments.

“Sin descanso” may be regarded as a journey through a landscape, which is formed by the multi-coloured possibilities of the Sopranino, Tenor, Basset and Paetzold Contrabass. In the beginning as well at the end of the piece is a passage which refers to folkmusic. The piece starts in a “Sardana”like fashion, empoying the simultaneous playing of theSopranino and a small drum attached to the wrist.

All sounds in the electronic part were derived from a beat on a drum and sampledblockflute sounds.The larger part of the piece is strictly notated, the musician however is given  the opportunity to improvise at certain points. The live and the electronic part are intended as equal partners, in the end  the live musician turns out to be the true soloist after all.
Roderik de Man


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