Juan Carranza | Mareas

Go To Artist Page

Album Links
Juan Carranza

More Artists From
CANADA - Québec

Other Genres You Will Love
Latin: Flamenco World: African- North Moods: Featuring Guitar
There are no items in your wishlist.

Mareas

by Juan Carranza

Guitarist Juan Carranza's vibrant blend of traditional and nuevo flamenco is driven by a spirited undercurrent of Latin and North African rhythms on this collection of ten original songs.
Genre: Latin: Flamenco
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Buy 2 or more of this title and get 40% off
Share to Google +1

Tracks

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
artist name
share
time
download
1. Mareas
Share this song!
X
4:25 album only
2. Fogata
Share this song!
X
4:50 album only
3. Persiguiendo la Luna
Share this song!
X
4:11 album only
4. Cosita Buena
Share this song!
X
5:51 album only
5. Asi Me Gusta
Share this song!
X
3:34 album only
6. La Remolina
Share this song!
X
5:57 album only
7. Sirena
Share this song!
X
4:52 album only
8. Entre Estrellas
Share this song!
X
3:45 album only
9. Serenata
Share this song!
X
3:07 album only
10. Viento Embrujado
Share this song!
X
5:52 album only
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Juan Carranza was first introduced to flamenco as a teenager in New York City when he met a gypsy musician who taught him a complex guitar technique known as rasqueado. This chance meeting ignited Carranza's passion for flamenco and eventually prompted him to seek the life of a traveling musician.

Returning to Costa Rica, his country of origin, Carranza lived on the beach while performing in bars and restaurants. His travels took him throughout Central America, Mexico and Europe including Germany, Holland and Spain.

Along the way, Carranza learned from encounters with other flamenco players and gypsies and honed his skills as a musician. Over the years, Carranza has developed a highly percussive right hand strumming technique which reflects the influence of Latin American rhythms and his role as a soloist and improviser.


Reviews


to write a review

Montreal Mirror


A lot has changed for Montreal flamenco guitarist/composer Juan Carranza in the four years since his last album Playa Gitana - shorn locks, fatherhood, a misplaced middle name (José). Furthermore, his music has become more nuanced and dynamic, as his recent third disc Mareas displays. What remains the same is the inviting, positive tone he brings to flamenco, his percussive playing style and of course the undying love of sand, surf and the stars above that his formative years in Costa Rica imprinted on him.

Mirror: There's been a four year lapse between your albums. How would you say your approach to flamenco has evolved?

Juan Carranza: The compositions are maybe less predictable, but always with a very strong rhythm. The point is for it to be more upbeat - not the deep, dramatic side of flamenco, but the more festive side of it.

M: Yeah, flamenco is very energetic music, but it can be a very rigid energy.

JC: My music's not as tense. You don't feel the pain. It's more of a liberating energy, breaking out of the pain and making you leave where you are and think of other places. The sense of the beach is still there. When people go on vacation, they just let loose, forget about where they come from and replenish their inspiration.

M: You've brought in a dancer, Rae Bowhay, as well. I understand that dance is an important ingredient of flamenco.

JC: Yeah, if you don't have the dance in a flamenco show, you might be labelled commercial, like Ottmar Liebert or Jesse Cook. You have to go back to improvisation, because that's one of the biggest characteristics of flamenco. With the dancer, you bounce off each other's inspiration at the time. Rae is a very fiery, dynamic dancer and she fits well with us because she's also very creative. She also does contemporary stuff on her own, and she's able to incorporate into our structures, which aren't always typical. Sometimes the typical structures are hard for people here to digest. We try to do something that doesn't exclude people, to stay true to the traditions, but also modify them a bit so that people can enjoy it without having to take a course in flamenco.

Montreal Mirror


A lot has changed for Montreal flamenco guitarist/composer Juan Carranza in the four years since his last album Playa Gitana - shorn locks, fatherhood, a misplaced middle name (José). Furthermore, his music has become more nuanced and dynamic, as his recent third disc Mareas displays. What remains the same is the inviting, positive tone he brings to flamenco, his percussive playing style and of course the undying love of sand, surf and the stars above that his formative years in Costa Rica imprinted on him.

Mirror: There's been a four year lapse between your albums. How would you say your approach to flamenco has evolved?

Juan Carranza: The compositions are maybe less predictable, but always with a very strong rhythm. The point is for it to be more upbeat - not the deep, dramatic side of flamenco, but the more festive side of it.

M: Yeah, flamenco is very energetic music, but it can be a very rigid energy.

JC: My music's not as tense. You don't feel the pain. It's more of a liberating energy, breaking out of the pain and making you leave where you are and think of other places. The sense of the beach is still there. When people go on vacation, they just let loose, forget about where they come from and replenish their inspiration.

M: You've brought in a dancer, Rae Bowhay, as well. I understand that dance is an important ingredient of flamenco.

JC: Yeah, if you don't have the dance in a flamenco show, you might be labelled commercial, like Ottmar Liebert or Jesse Cook. You have to go back to improvisation, because that's one of the biggest characteristics of flamenco. With the dancer, you bounce off each other's inspiration at the time. Rae is a very fiery, dynamic dancer and she fits well with us because she's also very creative. She also does contemporary stuff on her own, and she's able to incorporate into our structures, which aren't always typical. Sometimes the typical structures are hard for people here to digest. We try to do something that doesn't exclude people, to stay true to the traditions, but also modify them a bit so that people can enjoy it without having to take a course in flamenco.

Montreal Mirror


A lot has changed for Montreal flamenco guitarist/composer Juan Carranza in the four years since his last album Playa Gitana - shorn locks, fatherhood, a misplaced middle name (José). Furthermore, his music has become more nuanced and dynamic, as his recent third disc Mareas displays. What remains the same is the inviting, positive tone he brings to flamenco, his percussive playing style and of course the undying love of sand, surf and the stars above that his formative years in Costa Rica imprinted on him.

Mirror: There's been a four year lapse between your albums. How would you say your approach to flamenco has evolved?

Juan Carranza: The compositions are maybe less predictable, but always with a very strong rhythm. The point is for it to be more upbeat - not the deep, dramatic side of flamenco, but the more festive side of it.

M: Yeah, flamenco is very energetic music, but it can be a very rigid energy.

JC: My music's not as tense. You don't feel the pain. It's more of a liberating energy, breaking out of the pain and making you leave where you are and think of other places. The sense of the beach is still there. When people go on vacation, they just let loose, forget about where they come from and replenish their inspiration.

M: You've brought in a dancer, Rae Bowhay, as well. I understand that dance is an important ingredient of flamenco.

JC: Yeah, if you don't have the dance in a flamenco show, you might be labelled commercial, like Ottmar Liebert or Jesse Cook. You have to go back to improvisation, because that's one of the biggest characteristics of flamenco. With the dancer, you bounce off each other's inspiration at the time. Rae is a very fiery, dynamic dancer and she fits well with us because she's also very creative. She also does contemporary stuff on her own, and she's able to incorporate into our structures, which aren't always typical. Sometimes the typical structures are hard for people here to digest. We try to do something that doesn't exclude people, to stay true to the traditions, but also modify them a bit so that people can enjoy it without having to take a course in flamenco.