Larry Pegg | Afterlife

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Afterlife

by Larry Pegg

Larry Pegg aka LPGroove is Pre-releasing the American love song “Ogdensburg” as part of his album “Before and Afterlife: The Theory of Positivity”, an album that is raising funds and awareness for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention.
Genre: Folk: like Joni
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Ogdensburg” from the upcoming album “Before and Afterlife: The Theory of Positivity”

Scheduled for full release on World Suicide Prevention Day (Sept. 10th, 2013), Before and Afterlife: The Theory of Positivity is Larry Pegg's debut album. Five (5) Singles, including “The One You Love, Lookin’ for the One, Weight, Afterlife and Ogdensburg” are being released for Canadian Mental Health Week (May 6-12, 2013) and all the proceeds from Radio Play and Downloads (Tracked Globally and regionally) for this full week are going to support the cause.

THE CAUSE: Larry Pegg has devoted this soon-to-be released album to raising awareness and funds for the cause of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention. On an ongoing basis, he is donating 100 percent of all proceeds from downloads of the song Weight and 50 percent of any full album download proceeds to support the cause. 100 percent of proceeds are being donated during specific events such as World Suicide Prevention Day (Sept. 10, 2013).

Entering Canada’s Mental Health Week (May 6-12) Pegg hopes to engage Canadians in support of his music and to learn more about the issue and the cause. With a pre-release of selected songs, he’s approaching radio stations across Canada to air the music and for supporters to download it during Canada’s Mental Health Week. He will donate all of the radio royalties and download revenues for all of the music during this week of building awareness. Pegg is asking that we all try our best to spread the message of patience and strength, not only to those that are in crisis, but also to ourselves.

“We can all learn more about how to recognize the signs of emotional crisis and to help those that are suffering to step out from the darkness. If you’re feeling the weight of suffering, my message is “Please wait!” Consider the crushing burden that your survivors will carry forever if you don’t. You are needed. You are loved. Please Wait. Reach Out!” says Pegg.


The “search for hope” and “rising from the ashes” are poignant themes in our human struggle and they are often reflected in the art that connects us. Larry Pegg’s musical offering is a symbol of this pursuit, literally crossing over into the largely uncharted domain of a suicide survivor. He takes listeners into unimaginable and foreign territory — a journey of trying to live life after losing a child to suicide.

This album may be the first to connect us to the devastating anguish of loss and the reality of living as a suicide survivor. Pegg’s stories are sculpted in songs that emerge from the darkness in music that brings us closer together. Collectively they carry and send an uplifting message, one of determination, and to keep constant vigil in the struggle to make peace, and to find hope and meaning.

Pegg's material draws on a repertoire created over the last two decades — work that includes the happier times before, and the darker ones that came after losing his cherished daughter in December 2007. His songs are infused with driving rhythms, hooks and melodies that ring out from his acoustic guitar, conveying moving and powerful emotions. His supporting artists bring it all together, skillfully matching the energy and intent.

His song Weight — written while attending the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention’s National Conference in October, 2012 — became the catalyst for moving forward with the album. On the same day it was written, Weight was entered into the CBC’s Lynn Miles Song Writing Competition where it was judged in the top five. Weight is now completed and features a guest appearance by Lynn Miles, providing her vocal touch in a gracious gesture of support for the project.

Perhaps most importantly, Pegg is devoting this album to raising awareness and funds for the cause of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention. As an ongoing commitment, Pegg is donating 100% of the all proceeds for Weight to this cause.

Entering Canada’s Mental Health Week (May 6-12) Pegg hopes to engage Canadians in support of his music and to learn more about the issue and the cause. With a pre-release of selected songs, he’s approaching radio stations across Canada to air the music and for supporters to download it during Canada’s Mental Health Week. He will donate all the radio royalties and download revenues to the cause during this week. Pegg is asking that we all try our best to spread the message of patience and strength, not only to those that are in crisis, but also to ourselves.

“We can all learn more about how to recognize the signs of emotional crisis and to help those that are suffering to step out from the darkness. If you’re feeling the weight of suffering, my message is “Please wait!” Consider the crushing burden that your survivors will carry forever if you don’t. You are needed. You are loved. Please Wait. Reach Out!” says Pegg.

The Musicians

The amazing artists on Pegg’s album are Ross Murray (drums), Stuart Watkins and Patrick Giunta (bass), Fred Guignon (guitars), Jeff Rogers (keyboards and background vocals), and include guest appearances by Lynn Miles (background vocals) and New Orleans-based Aaron Fletcher (saxophone). Additional support came from many musical friends: James Clugston (drums and background vocals), Lynda Collins and Marion Xhignesse (background vocals) and Edmund Eagan (continuum operator).

“In making this album with these outstanding Canadian musicians, we’ve created something very rare, an epic soundscape that pays tribute to the serious subject matter and feeds back to the artists themselves. We shared moments of hard work and collaboration, of joy, compassion, tears and pain. I am indebted to each of these amazing friends and artists for helping me create this tribute to those that suffer and to those we’ve lost."

A Couple of Mental Health Facts:
Clara Hughes told us in February that Canada loses $50 billion in lost productivity annually. (Bell Let’s Talk). With the USA population about 10 times Canada’s perhaps their number could be $500 billion? Globally, each country around the world pays a high cost due to Mental Illness, emotionally and economically and in terms of lives.
Suicide risk is at its highest in the spring.

More about the songs coming on the album

Canada’s America?

You can like it, or leave it, there is no denying how close Canadian’s are to America, both geographically and inspirationally. There is so much about America that draws us to it. The border between us was once the world’s longest un-guarded border. Times have changed, and the world is a scarier place. As I have crossed this border so many times over the last two years, this in search of love and hope, in the aftermath of grief, I’ve come to know you better. This album is a test for me. Americans and Canadians and trotters of the Globe alike will be the judge of whether I have tapped into whether I have reasonably captured our similarities and differences.

Ogdensburg is a song of two hearts searching for and finding love. In finding that love, it comes with an acknowledgment of each other’s loss, and their insecurity and it comes with fear, in this case, a hybrid of homeland insecurity and the growing economic and social depression of small-town America. I’ve combined that with the risks that we all take, crossing over to find our way through hard times and to better ones.

Last of the Hot Summer Days was written on September 11th, 2011, ten years after 9-11. It speaks to my strong feelings of connection to America’s 9-11 grief, a grief that we all shared. Unintentionally, it speaks to America’s continued loss of innocence in tragic events like Newtown where parents also lost their beautiful children in December. At the time of the albums final tracking, another American tragedy in Boston. Let’s stop the madness.

Written in better times, Business is Business is a ‘yacht rock’ parody about the absolute sociopathic businessman. The great alto saxophone work was performed by New Orleans musician Aaron Fletcher. I wanted to include it as a tribute to The Occupy Movement and in particular I think it fits Occupy Wall Street. I can imagine the Gordon Gekko’s slicing their way through people’s savings with impunity. I’ve actually run into a few along the way. You? It’s a song that has brought many laughs and great harmonies when I played with my good friend James Clugston (BG on this) and friends. In a sense, it’s a tribute to those better days, the days before my loss. There’s a Flight of the Concords reference for good measure.

The Canadian Connection: Canadian landscapes and imagery are woven into songs like Even in the Cold, Still Standing, The Well and Afterlife.

Even in the Cold was written to celebrate the legacy of Pierre Elliot Trudeau, arguably Canada’s most famous and certainly Canada’s most flamboyant prime minister. I wrote it following his funeral in Montreal, October 2000. I attended with my daughter from

I was moved to attend Pierre’s funeral for a number of reasons. Primarily I was very moved by his legacy, but on a human scale, the loss of his son Michel in 1998 affected me the most. It showed us all that public heroes and icons are still fragile and vulnerable people like the rest of us. Many believe that Pierre's loss of Michel was his undoing, and that he lost his will to fight for life. Little did I know that I would experience the same anguish when I lost my daughter. Was this experience and others preparing me for what was to come in my life?

I wrote Still Standing in January 2008, only 6 weeks after losing my daughter. It would have been her 21st birthday on January 20th. It snowed relentlessly that winter, the 2nd highest snowfall on record. I was staring at the rock garden where my daughter had proudly built her Inuksuk. Although the garden is overrun with weeds now, it still stands untouched there today 5 ½ years later.

I wrote The Well as a coming of age song for my living daughter, my youngest, as she prepared to go to Italy for a summer trip in 2008. It was very hard to see her go.

More details are on the LPGroove(dot)ca website. Please buy and support the cause.


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