Mr Free | Writes of Passage

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Black Thought Nas Talib Kweli

More Artists From
United States - California

Other Genres You Will Love
Hip-Hop/Rap: East Coast Reggae: Roots Reggae Moods: Type: Lyrical
There are no items in your wishlist.

Writes of Passage

by Mr Free

Forceful flavor, with a touch of consciousness, all pulled together with an East Coast edge.
Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap: East Coast
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Buy 2 or more of this title and get 10% off
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. The Christening
Share this song!
X
3:45 $0.99
2. At the Door
Share this song!
X
4:21 $0.99
3. FreeDem
Share this song!
X
5:40 $0.99
4. Tell Momma
Share this song!
X
3:56 $0.99
5. Discipline
Share this song!
X
3:36 $0.99
6. Elementree
Share this song!
X
4:11 $0.99
7. Freedem Cry
Share this song!
X
4:04 $0.99
8. Mystic Man (feat. Shin-Q)
Share this song!
X
4:11 $0.99
9. Intentions
Share this song!
X
3:31 $0.99
10. Move On (feat. Lisa Taylor)
Share this song!
X
3:43 $0.99
11. Never Forgotten( feat. Omar Samaha)(In Memory of Reema Samaha and)
Share this song!
X
4:00 $0.99
12. Do Ya Thing
Share this song!
X
2:53 $0.99
13. Step To Me (feat. Crista Cappelletti)
Share this song!
X
4:22 $0.99
14. Wondering
Share this song!
X
3:55 $0.99
15. Mystic Man Remix (Matty G Dub Step Flex)
Share this song!
X
4:53 $0.99
16. Last Writes
Share this song!
X
4:13 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
For lyrics and more please visit: www.wellrootedmusic.com

1. The Christening
Strange as it may sound, I believe we chose our parents before we came to Earth. Actually, we chose it all. Our brothers, sisters, friends, jobs, everything. We did so in order to come here and gain the Soul lessons we are looking for. That's not to say that there are no choices to make here or that all things are happening the way they "should." Merely that we come from a timeless realm in which we can access the future without inhibition because we are not defined by the same laws that apply to humanity. If you consider time to be one of those laws. (because there are still humans who experience timelessness)
2. At the Door
As you can imagine, leaving the Bronx for a town in upstate NY with a population of 20,000, mostly white people, was quite a shell shocking experience. In the city, at least at the age I was, color and appearance was not really an issue. My classroom demographics represented countries from all over the world. To transition from there to a place where I not only looked different but for the 1st time in my life was being told so, was a challenge to say the least.
Aside from my personal struggles I also witnessed that of my father and older brother, whom each had much more city in their blood than I did. Prejudice is a dynamic that manifests in various different ways. Sometimes it was blatant and in the face, others, more covert and equally hard to swallow.

This piece is not only recalling that transition, but also beckoning those who, as adults, embodied some of the most fierce hatred and ignorance I've ever witnessed. "Is your skin so deep? Have you lost no sleep?" It's one thing for my younger peers to be ignorant. Although age is no excuse, it somehow softens the blow compared to the rationale of grown ups who were well calculated and aware of the depth of their actions.

Composing this was pretty intense, as Speaks' instrumental really took me back and had me re-living experiences I had not thought about in years. It's not that they were 'repressed' but this is the type of stuff that I choose not to give much energy to on account of striving to embody light. Ultimately that is why I feel I chose this path prior to incarnation. To not only grow through the struggles, but also teach or shed light upon the dark spirited or ignorant. In my lifetime alone we've come a long way. Although we haven't reached a utopia just yet, I feel as if we are at the very least, At The Door.


3. FreeDem
FreeDem is based on my sophomore year in high school which was without question, the 'worst' year of my life. On account of many forces, (some internal, some external) I found myself darker and lower than I'd ever been.

There is something to be said for that age/phase of life when a boy feels like he is a man (which is usually not the case just yet) and isn't being treated like one. As an educator my heart goes out to many of my students who I see enduring this same dynamic as their parents are pressuring them, friends swaying them, teachers irritating them to the point where there really seems to be no escape. Disheartening as it is, it strikes me as no surprise when those same students show up to class red-eyed (high), searching for just that, an escape.

It's my belief that the source of such frustration is the infrastructure we rely on to shape our children. Education is essential and empowering, yet the means by which we educate our youth are archaic, monotonous and downright depressing at times. There's a book entitled "This Book is Not Required" by Inge Bell which gives an in depth look at some of these dynamics within our education system.

One would think that at such a tender age, youth could enjoy a care-free lifestyle. Yet something about the impending decisions and all the conflicting voices that seemed to be vying for attention within, truly made for borderline insanity.

It was around this time that I began reading books about quests. It soon came to light that these were the determinant years of my existence. The ones where the greats started to differentiate themselves by way of mentors and great teachers. Yet, although everything inside of me wanted to walk away in hopes of finding a true teacher, I was socially required to sit, be quiet and regurgitate all that was being force fed. "In Babylon, they don't murder you they slowly bleed you."

Free Dem is simply a call to shatter all those walls and barriers that keep youth caged in and chasing after an ever-elusive potential.

4. Tell Momma
This was the 1st song written on the album. It also gave birth to not only the album title but the entire basis of this project. Conceptually, it takes the anguish of FreeDem and says 'Finally, I'm steppin out.' "I gotta do my thing." For one reason or another American culture (or lack there of) fails to definitively crown a boy a man. The result of which leaves many lingering in a psychological limbo of sorts as they strive for self definition and worth. This is in sharp contrast to many indigenious cultures which have rituals and the like that proclaim to all who gather that this is a child no more.

I can't recall the exact words, but the Bible states that Prophets do not get recognized at home. Which I've always thought is such a beautiful passage (so beautiful I can't remember it) because I couldn't help but imagine Jesus returning to Bethlehem (or Nazareth) and all his boys talking trash to him like, "Miracle Man? Whatever Duke, I remember when Miss Spencer put you in the corner for actin up in class!" I feel this is a testament to presence. Until you break free from the thoughts of others and are no longer binded by your past, you may never know your true potential.

In all, Tell Momma is a song of liberation. The relief of being released into the world, no holds barred and allowed to go where inspired and grow accordingly.


5. Discipline
"With great power comes great responsibility." Now that manhood's been achieved and most blockades removed, there is no one to blame or hold accountable outside of self. No matter how I was raised and what I was taught, I'm awake and aware now, it's up to me to cultivate this path according to what I know to be truth.
I was talking to my favorite college professor, Doug Allen, one day about the peace of mind and clarity that I was experiencing in light of my new commitment to meditation. He chuckled and said, "One would think that with such distinct results we would all do it everyday. But trust me, there will still be periods where you go months without practicing." And he was right. I do.
Much of my youthful disdain has been replaced with an awareness that I can do anything I want to. The only challenge is making up my mind to do it, again and again. As a child, I begged for a drum set. My parents, lectured me at great length before giving in and purchasing one for me. I beat them things up off beat for a few good months. And no longer than a year later, were those drums sitting in the basement unattended to, well on their way to becoming a distant memory. No question I could be a phenomenal drummer had I stuck with the program, but without commitment all those dreams float by like clouds.
And it's this same dynamic that pertains to all facets of life. I now understand why my coaches were telling me they weren't just talking about football and basketball. They were addressing Life. And it's true, the mindset that I approached athletics with has undoubtedly carried over to everything I choose to sink my teeth into. If it's greatness you desire, then it's discipline you require.

6. Elementree
I remember when Jeri Nova gave me this instrumental. I think I listened to it for at least 5 hours without even a word coming to mind. The music itself captivated me, it told such an intense story. I knew I had to dig deep to match that intensity.

Being the 2012 fanatic that I am, it only made sense that I address such a profound message with the palate provided. On the brink of such massive Earth Changes I (ideally) strive to use music as a platform to shed light on concepts or beliefs that may not get much attention in the public eye. In this case, I feel there's a culmination between prophecies (Mayan Calendar, White Buffalo Calf, Revelations) and the natural progression being set into motion by man's population expansion and ever increasing dependency on technology.

Written from the perspective of the Timeless One, there's a constant ebb and flow between past and future. "Previous lives many kings have assassined me ~ Mortal I'm not there'll be more of me after me" A contrast that's fitting on account of our past inevitably shaping our future. Yet there's an overall sense of darkness that sets the tone, which really captures my impressions of the days to come. Although I am not on some doomsday, fear-based, apacolypse state of mind, I do believe there will be great loss on account of the pending transition. One (transition) I feel the majority of humans are continuing to overlook for one reason or another.

Regardless, the truth will be told, as 2012 is soon approaching.


7. Freedem Cry
This is a true story based on the life of Selam Gerzher Alemayo. A good friend of mine, whose journey here in America I've been blessed to witness first hand. Yet I should emphasize, although that which is spoken here pertains to her, it is in no way only her story. Whether it's Ethiopians getting pushed out of Eritrea, or vice versa, or Palestinians getting pushed out of "Israel," or Native Americans off of their land here, there is a universal struggle in which politics are displacing humans throughout the globe. Her story strikes a chord which resonates cross-culturally.

The entire story is pretty gut-wrenching, but for some reason the 3rd verse is the one that hits me hardest. Probably because I've witnessed this so many times within my own classrooms. But to think that after enduring such great adversity and barely escaping with her life, she and all who are like her are greeted with ridicule and belittlement on account of not knowing the language not only reflects ignorance on our behalf, but also insensitivty on many levels. Disheartening indeed. But at least this story has a happy ending.


8. Mystic man feat. Shin-Q
Probably the 1st decent song I ever wrote was a piece written in Kaua'i (Hawaii) entitled Mystical. So when I got my hands on this track it kinda took me back to living there and many of the dynamics I was choosing to value over a full-on plunge into the rat race.
It's funny cause I usually find myself restraining or toning down a lot of the inner mystic when it comes to hip hop. But in thiis piece, the reggae palate somehow freed me up to say alot of things I think about, but rarely speak on musically. Not to mention, Shin-Q spit his verse to me before I had written mine, and he set the bar REAL high. I already knew from our work on the 13th Floor project, and "Dem Know" from the 1st album, that anytime we link up I've gotta bring some Fiya cause the brotha is gifted.

In terms of the grander scheme, this is the ideal self. The Free that renounces all attachments to humanity and it's interweavings. Of course there has to remain a balance between this and mundane responsibilities, yet I feel each of us has that inner Mystic Man (Woman) screaming to break loose and just live!


9. Intentions
"Project intentions~next dimensions~make arrangements~plans they change in armed engagement." This is the premise to my entire life view. The Universe is very much alive and responsive to our thoughts words and actions. However, it cannot manifest our dreams or visions unless we tell It what we're envisioning. The more we continue to project, the more energy surrounds those intentions, hence aligning the series of events that provide the opportunity to make the dream real.
The powerful element of this song is I actually wrote it a good 6 months before I got word I was moving to Tokyo. So at the time it was merely my prayer, so to speak. Needless to say, THIS was the song I listened to when bording the plane in DC..and arriving in Tokyo!

10. Move On feat. Lisa Taylor
God Bless Lisa Taylor! (Buddha Too!)
I ran into an old friend who recounted the ups and downs, trials and tribulations of an ongoing relationship she'd been in and out of for a good 5 years+. And as she told her story, it sounded all too familiar as I'd witnessed similar dynamics play themselves out in the lives of many of my closest girlfriends.

The underlying theme was Good Girl, with a Bad Dude, and everyone could see it but her. And the main reason she couldn't see it is she doesn't recognize her own worth. Although Love is Love and I respect that there are energies at work there that transcend all Earthly definition, sometimes roping us back in to what seems senseless to all outsiders. I still wanted to convey (to all) that you are beautiful. See that, and don't be afraid to recognize that despite what society tells you you should think about yourself. Find strength in that knowledge. So much so, that you may have to dismiss some potential (inept) lovers before you can attract the ideal partner.

But this is still very much about the internal wrestling match. Try as we may, there is no escaping the biological clock. As disappointing as it is to see a friend compromise, ultimately..I UNDERSTAND! "If my parents had a been this picky, Earth would never get me, what you want me wait til 60?" It is not my role as a friend to play God in anyone's life or pass judgment on them. (God doesn't judge anyway!) But I will forever be that voice in her/your ear helping evaluate the situation and the deicions adding up to that moment.

And that's when Lisa Taylor steps in! All I did was tell her what the song was about and pass her the music. She took this piece to such a powerful place. Simply put she's got soul! And it's never been more evident than here.


11. Never Forgotten feat. Omar Samaha
{In Memory of Reema Samaha and Erin Peterson}
I was living in Santa Cruz, California when the Viriginia Tech "massacre" happened. But unlike most of my neighbors and fellow friends, I had personal ties to the slaying. Just a few years prior I had been teaching at Stone Middle School, where both Reema and Erin attended. In my 1st full year of teaching, any student affiliated with that building felt like my very own. To this day, I still remain connected to a handful of them.

It was interesting for me to be on the west coast when this happened because the impact wasn't quite as forceful as it was back east. Yes, it was tragic and moving, but most of my community seemed unaffected by the news. Obviously it had a dramatically different effect on me. Which raised all sorts of questions about media and the dehumanizing effect of all the violence we witness on a daily basis.

Many of my old students reached out at this time and I never felt so helpless in my life. "Old students hollerin do somethin do somethin, said you had powers Mr. You Frontin You Frontin"

My initial intent was to script a piece that paid tribute to the light they brought to their days, but I couldn't get past the pain. Unlike most news stories, this one hit home. And it really stuck with me. In my humble attempt to pay homage, I found myself more of less describing the disbelief of it all.

Reema's brother Omar, was gracious enough to grant me an interview. A man in his young 20's, it was absolutely beautiful to see how the passing of his sister transformed his entire life. A naturally positive person, he began to focus his energies at the politics and establishment surrounding gun lobbying. His story was insightful in itself.

All in all, this was my way of looking toward the heavens and proclaiming I'll never forget.

Director's Notes: I was questioned by the police in Toronto for appearing to be drunk while walking down the street, working on this peice in the middle of the night.

12. Do Ya Thing
Sometimes you gotta move.

13. Step to Me feat. Crista Cappelletti
For those that don't know, Crista is an up and coming star. We had talked about putting something together since we met. So, it was an honor for me to rock with her. But more than anything it was fun. So much of my material is real intense, so it was refreshing to put a piece together that was thoughtful, but playful as well.


14. Wondering Why
Heartbreak Hotel right? This is actually a remix to the original (which my dad swears is better) that I laid down with Speaks years ago. The 1st time i heard the track (DJ Boom/Listen Vision), I spit this to it and it was a perfect fit.
How could I possibly have a commentary on a boy becoming a man without a discussion on heartbreak? I love the vulnerability of this song. Most hip hop songs take a stance of superiority. As if the MC is all powerful. In this case, I set out to reveal the weakness that most gloss over. And even give a little insight at it's roots..."All the hearts that I slain, guess the karma came back"


15. Mystic Man Remix (Matty G Dub Step Flex)
I shot out to Santa Cruz and played a few ruff cuts from the album for my man Matty G. The second he heard this one, his eyes lit up. He volunteered his powers and I was like Hell Yeah!! I rememeber when I heard this I went nuts! Then drove over to Shin-Q's and went nuts again! Ya'll need to check Matty G, he's rippin the dub-step scene up!


17. Last Writes
I must say this is my favorite song on the album. In part cause I was working with Oddisee on this, and he's a producer i have a great deal of respect for. Watchin him build this from scratch was enjoyable in itself.

The message speaks for itself, but the playfulness of the lyrics is what separates this song from the rest for me. I actually wanted this to be a 10 minute piece where the muic just rode out for awhile and you could just zone to it. But Oddisee wasn't trying to hear all that, and in hindsight he prolly made the right decision.

It was only fitting to close out the album with the last step in the life cycle. From reincarnation to resurrection to heaven's gates, there's a wide variety of spiritual paths and beliefs in this one. But ultimately, the viewpoint is to simply have fun with what we're given and trust all that will fall into place when the time is right.
Bless


Reviews


to write a review