Namoli Brennet | Namoli Brennet (Live)

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Lucinda Williams Patty Griffin Shawn Colvin

More Artists From
United States - Iowa

Other Genres You Will Love
Folk: Alternative Folk Folk: Folk-Rock Moods: Solo Female Artist
There are no items in your wishlist.

Namoli Brennet (Live)

by Namoli Brennet

Poignant, Introspective folk from one of the country's top acoustic artists. Recorded live over the course of 6 months and 14,000 miles.
Genre: Folk: Alternative Folk
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Surrender (Live)
Share this song!
X
3:55 $0.99
2. Grapes of Wrath (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:43 $0.99
3. Settle Down (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:33 $0.99
4. Rough Enough (Live)
Share this song!
X
3:58 $0.99
5. Good Life (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:33 $0.99
6. Iowa (Live)
Share this song!
X
3:39 $0.99
7. The Lottery Song (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:28 $0.99
8. Border Crossing (Live)
Share this song!
X
6:03 $0.99
9. Counting Rosaries (Live)
Share this song!
X
3:37 $0.99
10. Black Crow (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:50 $0.99
11. Dust On the Radio (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:40 $0.99
12. Isn't That Enough (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:11 $0.99
13. Stars (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:53 $0.99
14. I Will Get Along (Live)
Share this song!
X
6:14 $0.99
15. Turning Song (Live)
Share this song!
X
4:30 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
For many music listeners, there's nothing quite like a live show. There's a vulnerability and immediacy that's difficult to create in a studio setting, and much like live television there's a risk involved that just plain makes it more exciting. Namoli spends most of the year touring, and over the course of about 6 months she managed to compile recordings from shows all over the country - everywhere from the woods of Becket, MA to downtown San Francisco. This CD is the result of hours and hours of recording, and the tracks that made the cut were the ones that really stood out as being a great performance of a particular song from a particular night. Whether it's hearing "Border Crossing" in Edom, Texas or "Counting Rosaries" in Kalispell, Montana, we think you'll agree that it captures the essence of Namoli's gorgeous and introspective music.


Reviews


to write a review

Justin Rosini/Rainbow Times

For those of you who have been looking for your next folk hero, you can stop. He
The new live album by transgender songwriter Namoli Brennet, is filled with hope and melancholy, love and loss, joy and bitterness. Drawing upon six of her eight albums, dating back to her 2002 debut Boy In A Dress, the prolific country folk singer blends these emotions into themes of freedom and distance traveled in the album’s 15 tracks, three of which are previously unreleased. A deft acoustic player, the tracks feature her and her guitar with little else. Not that anything more is needed; her smoky vocals and flying fingers fill her performance spaces perfectly, the power of her voice harnessed by subtlety. Although the album features Brennet live from a variety of places and venue sizes, her voice and guitar seem to move almost seamlessly throughout, occasionally broken up by some stage banter.

Opening with the as-yet unreleased “Surrender,” Brennet immediately draws the listener in with a plea for understanding and support. “I know I’m not the only one to break up,” she sings, and one can empathize when she admits to raising a white flag and surrendering to the conflict within. She uses her guitar as a shield, deflecting the world’s weight, both here and on the beautiful ballad “Counting Rosaries,” which finds her calling out to saints and remembering childhood prayers to gather strength to forge through life’s rough patches. She is just as apt at using her guitar as a sword, however, on tracks like “Grapes Of Wrath” and “Border Crossing,” the former a marcher that poignantly captures the modern plight of disenfranchisement and the latter a tender, biting and absolutely crushing tale of a family trying to gain entry to the country and those trying to assist them.

According to her blog, Brennet has lived for over a year without a permanent address. Instead, she has traveled the country, playing venues and house concerts along the way. Listening to “Dust On The Radio,” one can easily picture her driving down an endless mid-western highway on a blindingly sunny day with the windows open, the static on the radio matched only by the static landscape, as she heads to another gig in a nameless town. In “Iowa,” her wandering seems to have found a home. Recorded at KPLV Studios in tiny Decorah, Iowa, this ballad finds her yearning “to be sown, to be grown, to belong as I belong in Iowa,” and is reminiscent of Paul Simon singing his own love song to Memphis, Tennessee in “Graceland.”

The haunting “Settle Down” has her drumming percussion on her guitar and marveling at the way voices from the past whisper what needs to be heard in the present. She challenges us, asking, “Who among us was born to settle down? We were born to rise.” There is power in her sparse playing and in her earthy vocals as she tests the boundaries of our freedom, using civil rights icons of the past to illustrate her point that change is coming, change is here, change is continuing. She leaves the burden of its continuance to us.
If you have never had the benefit of hearing Namoli Brennet sing live, this is a more than acceptable substitute and a great place to start for the first time listener. It is a greatest hits album of sorts – one that captures the spirit of her catalogue, as well as her own lofty spirit, in an hour and ten minutes. For those who have been looking for their next country folk hero, you can stop. Here she is. She has been waiting for you to arrive.