Ne'er Do Evers | 100% Wrong

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Official Ne'er Do Evers Site Ne'er Do Evers on the End Up Records Site MySpace

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United States - NY - New York City

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Rock: Hard Rock Rock: Shoegaze Moods: Featuring Guitar
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100% Wrong

by Ne'er Do Evers

We found a hidden case of 90's indie rock, turned up our amps, and drank it.
Genre: Rock: Hard Rock
Release Date: 

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1. Lhasa Apso
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3:28 $0.99
2. Who Forgot You
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2:21 $0.99
3. Closing the Coffin
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3:26 $0.99
4. Matt1
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3:56 $0.99
5. Down Time
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4:02 $0.99
6. Choose Your Own Adventure
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2:45 $0.99
7. Floory Anna
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2:02 $0.99
8. Ditch
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2:53 $0.99
9. Rat Rat Ratty Hole
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Borne of the pulsating musical scene that is post-millennial Brooklyn, The Ne’er Do Evers have been making their chaotic punk-pop since August of 2006. With a line-up of experienced musicians playing the songs of frontman Chris Buckridge, the Ne’ers are an animated mix-tape of anger, humor and vulnerability, each emotion likely to merge into and/or trample on the others at any moment. The Ne’ers play music that is fifty percent heavy thoughts and fifty percent knee-jerk reactions with a sound best described as full-on in-your-face visceral mooning, a distillation of art, alcohol and attitude—not only intoxicating but mind-numbing in a good way.

The band’s name reflects Buckridge’s slacker trappings: “I’ve always admired people who weren’t ambitious,” he says. “We don’t think about it too much, we just play.” But that’s not the whole story. Buckridge has worked incredibly hard to craft the illusion of indifference: the band’s EP Vessels and full-length record Idiot Garden were recorded on a 4-track machine pre-2006, with Buckridge playing virtually all instruments on all tracks, with a sprinkling of guest musicians thrown in for color.

The Ne’er Do Evers have an eclectic mix of influences, many of them based in the do-it-yourself aesthetic exemplified by Daniel Johnston, Sebadoh, Frank Black & the Catholics, Dinosaur Jr., Paul Westerberg, Iggy Pop, The Stooges, Black Flag, The Minutemen, Todd Rundgren, and They Might Be Giants, just to name the most important. As far as they’re concerned, if someone else got away with it, so will they.

Before the current version of the band, the Ne’ers had an earlier life with a rotating cast modeled on Guided By Voices’ rotating lineups of the late ‘90’s. Tiring of the inconsistency, Buckridge folded the band for three years, didn’t record, didn’t play, but kept writing new Ne’er Do Evers songs. In August 2006 he and guitarist Mike Quoma, one of the regulars from the earlier lineup, got back together. They brought in bassist Matt Moon, a veteran of the Brooklyn scene, as well as talented drummer Jason Bemis Lawrence, the four of them gigging whenever and wherever. Jason has brought a new and exciting intensity to the group, helping push the music farther and faster in a thousand directions at once. The foursome toured the Northeast with great success and plan to get out on the road again asap. As far as Buckridge is concerned, this is the band he always imagined the Ne’er Do Evers would be.

100% Wrong is the Ne'er Do Evers' most recent record. A return to the studio, and the first for this line-up, it also marks the entrance of group writing and arranging in the constantly-on-the-move Ne'ers dynamic.


"Chris Buckridge is Brooklyn's best-kept musical secret. Dreamy pop, spikey rock, demented glee...he does it all--often in the same song. Some say he's Frank Black's long-lost kid brother; I say Mr. Black better watch his back." --Andrew Hultkrans, author, "Forever Changes" (33 1/3 series)


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