Oto | Time Capsule Sunday

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United States - Illinois

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Electronic: Ambient Avant Garde: Microsound Moods: Type: Background Music
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Time Capsule Sunday

by Oto

Having produced music for Sony, Mercedes-Benz and Heinz, Chicago based sound designer Kiku Hibino has released his first collection, concerns itself with themes of capturing and preserving fleeting moments.
Genre: Electronic: Ambient
Release Date: 

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Tracks

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1. Daidai oto
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4:14 $0.99
2. Outsideoverthere oto
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3:16 $0.99
3. Whitewall oto
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5:03 $0.99
4. Momo oto
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4:35 $0.99
5. Time Capsule Sunday oto
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4:14 $0.99
6. Ultramarine oto
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3:37 $0.99
7. Papp Zezz oto
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4:38 $0.99
8. Otokikiyama oto
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5:22 $0.99
9. Numbernine oto
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7:05 $0.99
10. Post oto
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3:34 $0.99
11. Film oto
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5:10 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
From dubby electronica to orchestral soundtrack, Chicago-based sound artist, oto (kiku hibino) explores various approaches in electronic music. His debut album “Time Capsule Sunday”, mastered by Curtis Roads (Asphodel), was just released from Otokikiyama Records* in 2007. Featuring CD-skipping sounds layered with field recordings, “Time Capsule Sunday” creates uniquely cinematic soundscapes.

As a rising freelance composer, oto has been actively producing music for commercial advertisements of major companies including Sony, Mercedes-Benz, Heinz, Toyota and so on. In 2006 oto participated in Stop-Rokkasho campaign curated by Ryuichi Sakamoto aiming to raise people’s awareness of the danger of nuclear power reprocessing plants. oto contributed a collaborative piece with Norma Field titled “Before Then” for world-wide downloading. Inspired by this experience, oto grows interests in environmental issues and starts his new project seeking creative uses of spoken words and field recordings in electronic music.


*Originally scheduled to be released from Sub Rosa in Belgium.

the wire (reviewd by ken hollings)
http://www.exacteditions.com/exact/browse/435/493/2634/3/72


more info at http://otomusic.com


Also available: Commercial Works 2004-2006 (iTunes)


Reviews


to write a review

p.j. doran

glitchy, colorful and smetimes dark instrumental electronic compositions
this experimental electronic soundscape includes a full range of found sounds to skippy-glitchy shoegazing drone. a minor comparison to OVAL could be drawn....a few tracks are joyous bliss while others venture into darker territories. beautiful.

leeloo

Enchanted with chic electronica sounds!
This album was indeed a discovery.
Sounds remind me of Oval and Takemura, but are more chic and cinematic.
Love Film and Otokikiyama the most. Momo is also amusing.
Recommended to Electronica fans looking for something unique!

otokikiyama

The Wire (May 2007)
The Wire (May 2007 #279 issue)

Having produced music for Sony, Mercedes-Benz and Heinz, Chicago based sound designer
Kiku Hibino has recently worked on the Stop-Rokkasho campaign, curated by Ryuichi Sakamoto,
to raise public awareness of nuclear reprocessing plants. This, his first collection, concerns itself with
themes of capturing and preserving fleeting moments: opener "Daidai" shakes and trembles like
a half-remembered Japanese folk tune. Elsewhere the composer uses the noises made by skipping CDs
as his source material, building them up into randomly shimmering tunes that rapidly come and go,
often disappearing beneath processed recordings of busy streets and crowded playgrounds,
as if he were trying to cram in as many memories as possible before it all disappears.
reviewed by Ken Hollings