Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui | Iwazumi & Usui Play Schumann Violin Sonatas Nos. 1 And 2

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Classical: Chamber Music Classical: Romantic Era Moods: Instrumental
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Iwazumi & Usui Play Schumann Violin Sonatas Nos. 1 And 2

by Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui

Iwazumi and Usui explore the works for violin and piano, as well as the compositional style, of late Schumann; the album includes the Fantasiestücke, initially conceived for clarinet and piano, which was the springboard for the violin sonatas.
Genre: Classical: Chamber Music
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. Fantasiestücke, Op. 73 No. 1
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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3:25 album only
2. Fantasiestücke, Op. 73 No. 2
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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3:15 album only
3. Fantasiestücke, Op. 73 No. 3
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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4:13 album only
4. Sonata für Klavier und Violine in A-Moll, Op. 105: I. Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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7:51 album only
5. Sonata für Klavier und Violine in A-Moll, Op. 105: II. Allegretto
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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3:57 album only
6. Sonata für Klavier und Violine in A-Moll, Op. 105: III. Lebhaft
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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5:55 album only
7. Grosse Sonata für Klavier und Violine in D-Moll, Op. 121: I. Ziemlich langsam; Lebhaft
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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14:41 album only
8. Grosse Sonata für Klavier und Violine in D-Moll, Op. 121: II. Sehr lebhaft
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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4:29 album only
9. Grosse Sonata für Klavier und Violine in D-Moll, Op. 121. III. Leise, einfach
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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6:01 album only
10. Grosse Sonata für Klavier und Violine in D-Moll, Op. 121: IV. Bewegt
Ray Iwazumi & Toshiki Usui
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9:33 album only
Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
As undeniably persuasive the music of Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) is, he creates many challenging moments for both performers and listeners. Turbulent thoughts and emotions are melded with a very sophisticated intellect that flirts with the cryptic, and his mode of discourse may, at first, be obtuse. But Schumann presents his ideas with such appealing beauty, and that is perhaps the invitation he extends to us. Our hearts once disarmed find his music to be immensely courageous, ingenious, and awe inspiring in its unflinching embrace of the human condition.

The Fantasiestücke (Fantasy Pieces), Op. 73, is a work originally intended for the clarinet and piano. Ferdinand David (1810 – 1873) (the concertmaster of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, particularly famous for his close work with Mendelssohn on the latter’s Violin Concerto in E minor), however, performed the Fantasiestücke on the violin, and then suggested to Schumann that he write specifically for the violin and piano. Schumann, likewise, authorized publication of the Fantasiestücke in its violin version.

Two sonatas written specifically for violin and piano (one in A minor and another in D minor) soon followed, and were composed in quick succession. The later D minor sonata was dedicated to Ferdinand David.


A note about Schumann and his tempo indications:

Schumann, who steeped himself in literature and the subtleties of poetic sentiment, chose sensitive and imaginative, yet also very disciplined and specific directions for his tempi, articulations and phrase markings. He also provides specific metronome number markings for all of the movements, and several of those metronome markings are unorthodox in that they fall between commonly accepted metronome marking divisions (e.g., The final movement of the Sonata in A minor is given a metronome marking of 94 [beats per minute] to the quarter note, whereas, on a traditional metronome, the ‘notched’ division after 92 is 96.) In this interpretation, Toshiki and I have approached Schumann’s uncompromising specificity in tempo as an indication of particular subtlety.

Ray Iwazumi


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