Rick Ford | Smoke and Mirrors

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Recommended if You Like
Bob Dylan Bruce Springsteen Leonard Cohen

Album Links
Official website rickfordsongwriter.com

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Great Britain / UK

Other Genres You Will Love
Country: Americana Folk: Alternative Folk Moods: Type: Acoustic
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Smoke and Mirrors

by Rick Ford

Americana meets Dylan, Springsteen and Cohen. Rock 'n' Reel review '... an album brimming with unpolished gems.' Maverick Magazine ‘… authentic outlaw spirit…balances a robust roots framework with delicacy and wistfulness where it really counts.’
Genre: Country: Americana
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. A Red Rose
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4:47 $0.99
2. Smoke and Mirrors
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5:28 $0.99
3. Lonesome Rider
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3:44 $0.99
4. Reflections of Madonna
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4:58 $0.99
5. A Song for Muktar
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4:40 $0.99
6. Whispers and Screams
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3:40 $0.99
7. May Life Treat You
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4:56 $0.99
8. Beyond the Clouds
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3:59 $0.99
9. Black Crow Blues
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4:19 $0.99
10. You’ll Never Leave Me
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4:16 $0.99
11. Kiss Your Blues Away
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3:55 $0.99
12. Far Side of Heaven
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4:11 $0.99
13. Lonesome Rider Part 2
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3:39 $0.99
Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
REVIEWS FOR SMOKE AND MIRRORS
ROCK 'N' REEL REVIEW. Jul/Aug 2008 'The irresistible
melody-rich immediacy of Whispers and Screams’ and
country tones of ‘You’ll Never leave Me’ contrast with
the compelling acoustic pop-rock of ‘A Red Rose’ and the
reflective acoustics of the harrowing ‘A Song for Muktar’
on an album brimming with unpolished gems.

MAVERICK MAGAZINE.Sep 2008 '… authentic outlaw spirit… balances a robust roots framework with delicacy and wistfulness where it really counts.’ Helen Carney.


Rick’s tradition is that of the singer/songwriter and storyteller; as well as being a musician he is a writer and is the author of three best-selling fantasy novels entitled ‘The Faradawn Trilogy’. His musical influences can be detected in his songs and his playing and his musical influences seem to mesh together with a timelessness beyond fashion like the blues, folk and country music that he loves so much.
Rick’s songs are steeped in the wild beauty of the hills, valleys and moorlands around his remote home in the Peak District countryside; at once simple, raw and earthy and yet at the same time filled with an indefinable sense of yearning. Though some of Rick’s songs are heartbreaking in their unflinching honesty, the insight he brings into his portrayal of the human condition is riveting.

Rick plays and sings in the pubs and clubs around North Staffordshire in the U.K., either on his own or with various other musicians including Kelly Pointon on accompanying vocals, Tim Mundy on mandolin and Ian Woolley on dobro, all of whom appear on Rick’s new CD, ‘Smoke and Mirrors.’He also plays in 'The Sons of the Light Crust Doughboys' with JohnPaul Hill on accordion and guitars and Steve Giddings on slide and other guitars.


Reviews


to write a review

Chris James

Smoke and Mirrors
I have been listening to Rick Ford's music for several years and this is his most impressive offering to date. Unlike the minstrel who starts young and then gradually fades away, Rick got a lot of living under his belt BEFORE embarking on the singer/songwriter path. The proof is in the listening, with his lyrics carrying the weight of experience, as opposed to being the baseless imaginings of a twenty-something wannabe. If you want intelligent, widely-travelled storytelling in your music, Smoke and Mirrors will get you thinking.

Peter Bettany

Smoke and Mirrors
A brilliant debut album. Listen to the evocative words, every track tells a story. Excellent backing musicians and vocals add to Rick's heartfelt lyrics. An album I think best enjoyed late at night, relaxing in your favourite chair with a glass of your favourite tipple. Blinds drawn against the cold outside, dim lights and the comforting glow of a log fire. I think the listener will soon be totally absorbed in the mesmerising musical mix of this superb offering!

Riley S. Friend

Smoke and Mirrors
Simply to re-print all of the song lyrics of this album would draw you into the richest storytelling experience.

Opening track, A Red Rose, the listener is directly transported to strangely familiar, yet alien former Soviet lands, by celebratory jingle jangle guitars belying broken dreams and decline, “the attic’s full of broken train sets and children’s tambourines”.

Title track, Smoke And Mirrors follows. A tour-de-force which will make you cry and laugh as the verses come tumbling out. It is guaranteed you will later find yourself inadvertently singing many lines, randomly taken from this song: “I saw a man shooting at molehills, just a crazy mountain man”. “I’m still balanced on the high wire, fall off every now and then”. How great would it be if, after a couple of months of slow build, this track was pouring out of every open window radio in the summer?

There is a dark but uplifting beauty contained throughout this disc.

Inspired Hammond organ haunts the lacerating invective of May Life Treat You. Positively 4th Street indeed.
The bright, open musical texture and the joyous backing singing from Kelly Pointon lend to an almost live and spontaneous feel, particularly on Kiss Your Blues Away.
A Song For Muktar, ghostly re-telling of casual violence and loss of life in Mogadishu, counterpoints completely Whispers And Screams which could have been written in some pre-1965 time of innocence.

Songs may be the windows into the soul of an artist. What a life experience Rick portrays on this, his first commercially produced, album. Brimful of distinctive, individual songs, which point to so much more to come.
I am reminded of Springsteen’s lyrics: “I learned more from a three minute record baby than I ever learned in school”. To continue to find that magic, after all these years, in new songs and songwriters.
Do yourself a favour, buy this album.