Rick Sowash | Sanctuary at 3am

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Aaron Copland Gerald Finzi Ralph Vaughan Williams

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United States - Ohio

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Classical: Contemporary Classical: Copland Moods: Mood: Intellectual
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Sanctuary at 3am

by Rick Sowash

\"American\" classical (like Copland, Gershwin, Barber, etc.) with French and English influences (Poulenc, Francaix, Vaughan Williams, Finzi, etc.)
Genre: Classical: Contemporary
Release Date: 

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1. Sanctuary at 3am (for clarinet & piano)
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6:29 $0.99
2. Lullabye for Kara (for cello & piano)
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7:19 $0.99
3. Variations on a Hiking Song (for piano solo)
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15:54 $0.99
4. Impressionist Suite #2: Cassatt: A Lullabye (for reed trio)
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3:35 $0.99
5. Impressionist Suite #2: Caillebotte: Precision (for reed trio)
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4:15 $0.99
6. Impressionist Suite #2: Sisley & Baziille: Joyful Skies (for ree
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5:08 $0.99
7. The View from Carew (for clarinet, cello & piano)
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10:00 $0.99
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Rick Sowash (b. 1950)
Unlike most composers, Rick Sowash has not sought an academic or commercial career in music. Following the example of Charles Ives, Sowash has retained his art as a passionate avocation, earning his living in non-musical ways. He is the author of three books about the history and folklore of Ohio, his native state. He has also been a politician, theatre manager, radio broadcaster and innkeeper. He is a member of ASCAP, both as a composer and as a publisher. His books, scores and CDs are published by the Rick Sowash Publishing Company. For more information, go to: www.sowash.com
His other CD's are:
Rick Sowash: Enchantment of April (Three trios for clarinet, cello and piano)
Rick Sowash: Eroica (Four works for various chamber ensembles)
Rick Sowash: A Portrait at 50 (Five works for various chamber ensembles)
Rick Sowash: Four Piano Trios (violin, cello and piano)
Rick Sowash: Chamber Music with Clarinet (violin, cello and piano)
Music for the Appalachian Trail includes Sowash's Fantasia on "Shenandoah"
Songs of Humor & Satire; choral music including "Philosophical Anecdotes"


Reviews


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The American Record Guide, Sept.0ct.'04 - Charles Parsons

"tonal, tender, melancholy, quietly old-fashioned and exquisitely beautiful"
The brief bio of Rick Sowash compares him to Charles Ives. “Unlike most composers, Rick Sowash has not sought an academic or commercial career in music. Folllowing the example of Charles Ives, Sowash has retained his art as a passionate avocation, earning his living in non-musical ways. He is the author of three books about the history and folklore of Ohio, his native state. He has also been a politician, theatre manager, radio broadcaster and innkeeper. He is a member of ASCAP, both as a composer and as a publisher.” Here any comparison with Charles Ives ends.
A brief quote from the composer says it all: “Even at this late hour, after the agony that characterized so much of 20th century music, we can return to the sanctuary of G major and g minor and take refuge in a slow, sad tune.”
Here we hear a collection of five slow, sad tunes, all beautifully played, mainly by members of the Cincinnati Symphony. (Sowash lives in Cincinnati.) “Sanctuary at 3am” is for clarinet and piano, “Lullabye for Kara” for cello and piano, “Variations on a Hiking Song” a piano solo; “Impressionist Suite #2” for oboe, clarinet and bassoon; and “The View from Carew” for clarinet, cello and piano.
It’s all totally tonal, tender, melancholy, quietly old-fashioned and exquisitely beautiful, exquisitely played. The music rests gracefully and gratefully in the ear. It’s music to “get away from it all.” What a treasure! What a pleasure!

Records International - June '04

"finely crafted and immensely appealing"
Sanctuary at 3 AM for Clarinet and Piano, Lullabye for Kara for Cello and Piano, Variations on a Hiking Song for Piano, Impressionist Suite #2 for Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon, The View from Carew for Clarinet, Cello and Piano. The second disc also contains a selection of Sowash's heartfelt and genuinely moving chamber compositions, from the gentle and comforting Sanctuary and Lullabye to the ingenious and elegant Variations for piano, in various styles including an infectious jazzy one, like a less deliberately funny relative of Reizenstein's Lambeth Walk variations (and concluding in serious mood, the last variation being an elegy for the composer's father, who died while Sowash was composing the piece). All the works are finely crafted and immensely appealing.

Chamber Music Journal, Winter '04 - Ray Silvertrust

"neo-classical, romantic, neo-romantic, or impressionist ... always original"
Rick Sowash (1950-), whose works, in my opinion, deserve to be as well-known as any of those of his contemporaries, is alive and composing in Ohio. His most recent CD, "Sanctuary at 3am," appeared earlier this year and features very attractive chamber works..... Mr. Sowash’s music cannot be pigeon-holed. At times neo-classical, romantic, neo-romantic, or impressionist, the music is always original and never hackneyed or low-brow. Mr. Sowash’s attractive music is always tonal although he does not, on occasion, hesitate to challenge his listeners by pushing tonality to its limits.

Classical.net - Steve Schwartz

What struck me immediately about Sowash's music is its "authenticity."
What struck me immediately about Sowash's music is its "authenticity." The music seems to express a real person and address the lives most of us lead, rather than to scale mountains with the goal of reaching God. The tone of a lot of it is what I've taken to calling American Common Sense - incidentally, not all that common. It's usually adopted by somebody really brilliant, who's trying to fly in under the ever-vigilant anti-intellectual radar: Robert Frost playing at the simple New England Farmer... It's a strategy almost exclusively confined to the U.S. It has a modesty, ingrained rather than put on. Musically, I'd compare it mainly to French composers like Françaix and Poulenc....