RUNA | Stretched On Your Grave

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Folk: Contemporary Celtic Folk: Celtic Folk Moods: Type: Acoustic
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Stretched On Your Grave

by RUNA

RUNA performs high energy contemporary and traditional Celtic music from Ireland, Scotland, Canada, and the U.S.. Comprised of international musicians, this award-winning, vocal and instrumental ensemble gives their traditional repertoire a unique sound.
Genre: Folk: Contemporary Celtic
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. The Newry Highwayman
Runa
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3:43 $0.99
2. Maid of Culmore
Runa
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3:35 $0.99
3. Siobhán Ní Dhuibhir
Runa
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3:08 $0.99
4. I Wish My Love was a Red, Red Rose/ Hector the Hero
Runa
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4:17 $0.99
5. Siúl a Rún
Runa
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3:52 $0.99
6. Fionnghuala
Runa
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1:35 $0.99
7. Stretched On Your Grave
Runa
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4:00 $0.99
8. The Star of Munster
Runa
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4:59 $0.99
9. The Holy Ground
Runa
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4:24 $0.99
10. The House Carpenter / Jolene
Runa
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5:28 $0.99
11. An Buachaillín Bán / The Custard Cream Reel / Humours of Tulla
Runa
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6:54 $0.99
12. Lowlands of Holland
Runa
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4:00 $0.99
13. Cailín deas Crúite na mBó
Runa
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5:05 $0.99
Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
We have been captivated by the similarities in songs written through the ages. Whether written ten years ago or forgotten for centuries, their haunting melodies and universal themes, express the same rawness of human emotions. Perhaps, it is these similarities that make them timeless, relatable, and so very intriguing. With "Stretched On Your Grave", we explore the resemblance of humanity's past and present through music, finding inspiration within traditions and blending our newer voices with them. We hope that you will accompany us on this artistic journey, as we weave between tales of adventure, longing, laughter, and love, and as we discover our own place among them.


Reviews


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Christopher Marcus

Definitely no time for the grave yet!
I first discovered Runa a year ago, and I have been pretty much hooked ever since. I'm a huge fan of Clannad, Wolfstone, Loreena McKennitt and similar artists so it was natural for me to check them out when I got the chance. Runa's 'take' on traditional Irish and Scottish music in particular is similar to the aforementioned artists - and yet completely unique. They are a small Philadelphia-based band, but their heart belongs to the Irish world of folk music, with occassional forays into other folk genres, both old and new. What strikes me about Runa in particular is that they still are able to imbue these 'outdated songs' with a vibrant energy that is very engaging and makes them feel just as fresh as if they were written yesterday! Their line-up is pretty simple - only three people, plus some guest artists. But it works because they have that special personality and intimacy in their music that larger, more commercial bands seem to loose after a while. When I listen to a Runa version of a traditional song I almost always feel like I want to be there - heck, sometimes I almost feel as if I AM there - *with* the band, on some local scene in Philly or elsewhere 'in the neighborhood.' Much credit to Shannon Lambert-Ryan for this. Her you will quickly get addicted to! She seems to be able to combine the best of so many other singers who have chosen to venture into this wonderful, magical quest to rediscover and renew the songs of old; there's a straightforward power and sensitivity in her singing, a feeling of light joy and beautiful sadness all at the same time; and all of these feelings immediately 'get to me' - in the good way, of course, whenever I hear her. And the sure-fire professionalism of this young band, the enthusiasm and the ingeniuty (such as combining a traditional like "The House Carpenter" with Dolly Parton's "Jolene") - it all makes for something that's devilishly captivating. You should really give them a try if you like straightforward, engaging revitalizations of traditional songs from Ireland and Scotland. I am quite convinced you will quickly be addicted, too :-)

Lori Lander Murphy, writer, www.irishphiladelphia.com

RUNA: "Stretched On Your Grave"
I first heard RUNA perform live almost two years ago, shortly after they had recorded their debut CD, “Jealousy.” I fell in love with that album, and I fell in love with the band that has pioneered their own innovative style of taking traditional Irish songs and “Celting them up” in a way that is uniquely their own.

With the release of their second CD, “Stretched On Your Grave,” they have only managed to surpass themselves.

RUNA is Philadelphia-based: singer Shannon Lambert-Ryan is a home-girl who grew up at The Irish Center in Mt. Airy, first as a step-dancer with the O’Donnell School of Irish Dance, and later dancing at the Friday-night ceilis with her mom, Julie Lambert. Percussionist Cheryl Prashker may have been born in Canada, but she was adopted by the folk scene here years when she joined up with the band Full Frontal Folk. And Dublin-born guitarist, Fionán de Barra, had no choice; he became a full-fledged Philadelphian when he showed his brilliant taste by marrying Lambert-Ryan.

This is an album whose release I have long been awaiting, if only because I knew it would contain the song that I have come to think of as RUNA’s signature piece, “The House Carpenter/Jolene.” “The House Carpenter,” a traditional ballad that is also known as “The Daemon Lover” and “James Harris,” is a well-known work that tells the story of a young wife and mother who is lured away from her home by a former lover who promises her the world. Shortly into their voyage, she regrets her decision and is drowned, never to see the face of her young child again.

Lambert-Ryan and de Barra were playing around with the tune one day, working with the verses: “There are many versions of the song…we wanted to craft the song to fit our style without changing it,” Lambert-Ryan explained. At the same time, they were listening to Dolly Parton’s classic song “Jolene,” and they realized that they could both be sung in the same key. Adding Prashker’s percussion underneath, the two songs blend perfectly, and create a brilliant and addictive take on an old ballad.

This is what comes through on the cd, the band’s love of “haunting melodies and universal themes.” Lambert-Ryan’s pure vocals shine on “I Wish My Love was a Red, Red Rose/Hector the Hero,” accompanied only by de Barra’s guitar playing. Simple, quiet and affecting, Lambert-Ryan preserves the original grace of the song while imbuing it with the passion that she imprints on everything she sings.

The title song, “I Am Stretched On Your Grave,” opens with Lambert-Ryan singing sean-nos, and then builds on the raw emotion of the tune as de Barra comes in with guitar, and fiddler Tomoko Omura draws the energy of the song to its conclusion. It’s an artistic fusion that creates a captivating and satisfying arrangement to the 17th century Irish poem originally titled “Táim sínte ar do thuama”.

Lambert-Ryan also sings several songs in their original Irish, “Cailín deas Crúite na mbó” and “Siúbhán Ní Dhuibhir.” The lovely ballad “Cailín deas Crúite na mbó” is performed with an effortless straightforwardness that captures the tale of “The Pretty Girl Milking a Cow,” while “Siúbhán Ní Dhuibhir” is infused with energy and percussion and the peerless flute playing of Isaac Alderson.

de Barra displays his own vocals on “Fionnghuala,” a tour de force of what has been described as Gaelic scat. The Scottish song was made famous by The Bothy Band, but de Barra’s version is a joyful gem that deserves its own place in the annals of Celtic music.

Throw in the instrumental “The Star of Munster,” which showcases Prashker’s percussion, de Barra’s guitar, and Alderson’s flute, and you have an album overflowing with stunning tunes and songs.

“Stretched On Your Grave” is an inspired album from a group that has found its voice, and its place, in the world of Irish music. With songs like “The Newry Highwayman” and “Lowlands of Holland,” played to traditional perfection with RUNA’s Celtic twist, it’s a CD that will get frequent play when you add it to the music shelf.