Susan Ferré | Stories from the Human Village: War & Peace

Go To Artist Page

Album Links
Ninetydays Classical More about Susan Ferré

More Artists From
United States - Texas

Other Genres You Will Love
Classical: Organ Spoken Word: With Music Moods: Type: Compilations
There are no items in your wishlist.

Stories from the Human Village: War & Peace

by Susan Ferré

This recording combines original narrative and organ music to take the listener on a journey through over 400 years, expressing a yearning for peace through the story-telling power of music.
Genre: Classical: Organ
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Buy 2 or more of this title and get 20% off
Share to Google +1

Tracks

Available as MP3, MP3 320, and FLAC files.

To listen to tracks you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin.

Sorry, there has been a problem playing the clip.

  song title
share
time
download
1. Europa! (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:25 $0.99
2. Domenico Scarlatti, Sonata, K. 255
Share this song!
X
2:30 $0.99
3. Not Serious Enough (narrative)
Share this song!
X
1:04 $0.99
4. Fr. Antonio (Soler?), Batalla on the Fifth Tone
Share this song!
X
2:03 $0.99
5. But the King's Armada (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:20 $0.99
6. Anonymous, My Lady Carey's Dompe
Share this song!
X
2:07 $0.99
7. Years Pass (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:43 $0.99
8. Michel-Richard de Lalande, Dinner music for the King, Louis XIV
Share this song!
X
9:31 $0.99
9. The Young King's Musicians (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:54 $0.99
10. Johann Sebastia Bach, Pièce d'Orgue (Fantasia in G Major), S. 57
Share this song!
X
9:18 $0.99
11. Not So Fast (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:52 $0.99
12. Anselmo Viola, Sonata
Share this song!
X
5:06 $0.99
13. Hélas! (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:23 $0.99
14. Padre Rafael Angles, Aria in D minor
Share this song!
X
3:41 $0.99
15. Eventually (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:21 $0.99
16. Anonymous, Toccata
Share this song!
X
3:58 $0.99
17. For the First Time (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:21 $0.99
18. Louis Vierne, Étoile du Soir (Evening Star), from Pièces de Fant
Share this song!
X
6:17 $0.99
19. Some Remembered (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:38 $0.99
20. Jean Langlais, Chant Héroïque, from Neuf Piéces
Share this song!
X
4:19 $0.99
21. Europa Today (narrative)
Share this song!
X
0:52 $0.99
22. Louis Vierne, Carillon, from 24 Pièces en style libre, Opus 31
Share this song!
X
4:07 $0.99
preview all songs

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
On Telling Stories Through Music
All pieces of music tell stories. They evolve from a variety of historical and cultural settings. At the very least they describe the stories of their own creation. Some are composed with the intention of setting a mood or creating a certain impression; some are not. This program contains pieces of both genres, put here in a larger context – an entertaining journey through the history of organ music. It is a story which expresses a yearning for peace.
The narrative involves a mythical place called Europa, a global village which keeps going to war. Eventually, exhausting all reasons for warring. its people conclude that peace must be earned. The story alludes to history, though nothing depicted is purely historical. The story-line both informs and creates a context for the various pieces, all perfectly delightful in and of themselves, now enhanced by their new placement within ideas quite relevant to our current lives. Do these pieces need the story to be effective? Certainly not. Can they speak to modern ears, with new meaning? Yes, absolutely.
Thanks are due to the Episcopal School of Dallas, Father Stephen Swann, Headmaster, to Choirmaster and Organist, Joseph Snyder, and organ builder, Fritz Noack, for their kind support of this project, as well as to Charles S. Brown, Craig Ferguson, and Miryam Hammond for their stories and inspiration.
Susan Ferré

Susan Ferré maintains an active concert career, having performed widely in Europe (including three visits to Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris), Scandinavia, Brazil, Canada, and throughout the United States. She has served the faculties of Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, Southern Methodist University, Perkins School of Theology, University of North Texas and the University of Paris at Vincennes. For more than twenty years Miss Ferré directed the Texas Baroque Ensemble, which brought distinction to performances of little known works on original instruments. She holds degrees from Texas Christian University and the Eastman School of Music. A Fulbright Scholar, recipient of the Diplome d’Orgue et Improvisation from the Schola Cantorum in Paris, as well as the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from University of North Texas, Susan Ferré was honored with a Distinguished Alumna award from that university in 2001. She is married to Charles Lang, a physician and musician, dividing time between Lake Texoma and New Hampshire. Their musician son, Carl, makes a brief appearance on this CD.

CD Review from The American Organist, January 2009, p. 97:

Stories From the Human Village: War and Peace (etc.)
This delightful recording demonstrates both the musical and the literary talents of Susan Ferre. She has conceived an imaginative original story about a mythical global village, Europa. Over an extended period, the characters, including royalty and common folk, experience times of tranquility and harmony, punctuated by times of war. The underlying themes of religion and music (especially organ music!) are the driving forces. Ultimately, a consensus is reached that peace must prevail; war is futile. In a pleasant, engaging manner, Dr. Ferre narrates each segment of the fictional story, which is inspired by history without quoting any particular event. She has selected a wide range of repertoire to aurally portray her tale, thus effectively transforming "absolute" organ works into program music. She has also provided a short historical survey of organ literature. Early music by ....... are balanced by music of Langlais ... and Vierne.... Each piece aptly describes the previously narrated event or amplifies the corresponding emotion. Dr. Ferre was the consultant for the lively, colorful organ in All Saints Chapel. The voicing is incisive, bold, and musical, enhanced by the excellent acoustics. The instrument is most effective in the early works, less so (as may be expected from an instrument this size) in the two large French works. Dr. Ferre's son, Carl Ferre-Lang, assists in two of the pieces by winding the "bird" stop (Pajarito), borrowed from a Regal built by Susan Tattershall. Susan Ferre is to be commended for her creativity in exploring new ways to present organ literature. By connecting organ music with human events (fictional or otherwise), it becomes relevant to new audiences. It is an effective way of introducing the organ and its literature to young and old alike. This would be an excellent tool for use by AGO chapters, schools, and others looking to win new friends for the organ. - -James Hildreth


Reviews


to write a review

Creative CD that Makes You Think About War

William and the RadioIndy.com Reviewer Team
"Stories from the Human Village": War & Peace by Susan Ferre' is a creative spoken word album that takes you on a journey through 400 years of human life. The format of the album is a combination of narrative tracks with musical tracks in between. The narrative tracks are well paced and tell an interesting story about changing kings and their influence on society, especially in terms of art and war. The musical tracks nicely capture the moods introduced by the narrative, and are generally based around the organ with organic elements here and there. Highlights include " Padre Rafael Angles, Aria in D Minor,".which is a down tempo piece with an emotion stirring arrangement. "Louis Vierne, E'toile du Soir" is another down tempo piece which also has a mysterious feel, and a silent element, where one feels like you could hear a pin drop in between measures. Other pieces such as "Fr. Antonio..." and "Louis Vierne, Carillon..." use blasting organ sounds to achieve a more battling and decisive feel. If you enjoy music that makes you think, especially about the subject of war, or you enjoy classical organ, you will like this CD.