Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann | Max Kowalski: Op. 4, Pierrot Lunaire

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Max Kowalski: Op. 4, Pierrot Lunaire

by Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann

Max Kowalski, 1882-1956, Holocaust Composer was a Polish born, German composer. His 12 song cycle, Opus 4, Pierrot Lunaire, written and published in 1913 and it was his most famous song cycle.
Genre: Classical: Romantic Era
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1. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: I. Gebet an Pierrot Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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2. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: II. Raub Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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3. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: III. Die Estrade Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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4. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: IV. Der Dandy Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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5. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: V. Moquerie Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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6. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: VI. Sonnen Ende Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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7. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: VII. Nordpolfahrt Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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8. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: VIII. Colombine Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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9. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: IX. Der Mondfleck Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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10. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: X. Die Laterne Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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11. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: XI. Abend Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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12. Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 4: XII. Heimfahrt Suzi More & Glenn Tiedemann
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Max Kowalski(1882-1956) was born in Kowal, Poland. His family moved the next year to Frankfort, Germany, where he grew up, studied and earned Doctorates in both Music and Law (his specialty was Copyrights). His teacher of compostition was Bernhard Sekles and voice, Alexander Heineman. In Germany from 1913 till 1931, Max Kowalski was a prolific composer of beautiful lieder in the Romantic style. Although he was Jewish, Max Kowalski wrote music of all styles and genres, from Japanese, Chinese, Danish, Arabic, French and that of many great German authors, he even wrote a Marienlieder in his Opus 12. He was friend to many other composers, artists and performers and every song cycle he wrote was quickly published until Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich took over the country. In the late 30's Kowalski was very involved with the "Kulterbund" in Frankfort, Germany and his music continued to have popularity in their orchestral concerts. He is mentioned and highlighted by his presence at the last Kulturbund concert(1938) in Martin Goldsmith's book entitled "The Inextinguishable Symphony". By the end of 1938, Kowalski was arrested and spent time in Buchenwald but within a month he was released and he fled to England where he spent the rest of his life teaching voice, singing in a Synagogue and making a humble living. Although no music of his was ever published again, he kept writing new works, 17 new song cycles in manuscripts which singers performed in concerts and on radio. Opus 1 is his first composition dated 1913 and first published by Leukart in Germany. It had been out-of-print many years until Dr. Walter Foster of Recital Publications in Huntsville, Texas took up the committment to bring as many of Max Kowalski's song cycles to the public as possible. So far, all of his 17 previously published cycles have been reprinted and several of the manuscripts are being printed as first editions.

A New Jersey native, Miss More has performed extensively throughout the United States and abroad. She has been soloist and has appeared in numerous operatic roles performing with the Festival Chorus of New Jersey, the Masterwork Chorus and Orchestra, Orpheus Chamber Singers, the Plainfield Symphony, Ars Musica Antiqua, the Garden State Chorale, the State Repertory Opera, Jersey Lyric Opera, Choral Baccarelli (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Academy of Vocal Arts Opera Theatre (Philadelphia, PA), Montclair Chamber Orchestra, and numerous others. In 1989, she was the award-winning collaborator along with composer Loretta Jankowski, of a song cycle entitled Phoenix, published internationally by Boosey & Hawkes, in December 1993. The work, featuring Ms. More, was presented at both the Los Angeles, California (1989), and Little Rock, Arkansas, national Association of Teacher's of singing (NATS) conventions. She is a recipient of several Lila Wallace/Reader's Digest Incentive Grants, for performance and research. She is a member of the NATS, NJ, NYC and National chapters. Also, a composer of jazz, folk and children's songs. Her voice teachers and coaches include Franco Rossi-Roudett, Terrence Shook, Helen Fenstermacher, Chloe Owens, Daniel Ferro, Marlena Malas, Dorothea Discala, Frank Valentino, Deborah Taylor, and Dolores Cassinelli. She has appeared in master classes with Elly Amelling, Jerome Hines, Judith Raskin, and Daltin Baldwin. Ms. Morehead holds a B.A. degree from Rutgers University, M.A. degree from Jersey City State College, and pursued studies at the Academy of Vocal Arts, in Philadelphia, and New York University.
She has worked as voice teacher, chorus director and Orff specialist at the Newark School of the Arts for over 27 years. As well as has taught over twenty years in the New Jersey school systems, now retired.

Glenn Tiedemann, Organist, Composer, Arranger, A native of New Jersey, his musical studies included Richard Paige Eckstein (Theory), Ralph Kneeream, David Randolph (Choral Music, German Diction) and Ting Ho (Theory and Composition) Has served as Organist Choir Director for the Belleville Reformed Church, Belleville, New Jersey, Central Brick Presbyterian Church in East Orange, and Brookdale Reformed Church, Bloomfield, New Jersey. In addition to his organist/director duties, Mr Tiedemann has been a very active church member and has worked as a member of the Advisory Board for a new hymnal for use in both the Christian Reformed Church and Reformed Church in America with denominations throughout the USA and Canada. Publication date is set for 2013.
In his own words “I am a lover of the human voice; from the effortlessly floating melodies and open harmonies of Gregorian Chant thru the nearly acrobatic melodies of the Mozart Aria. I also love the rich sounds and expansive harmonies of the Romantic Symphony and Piano Concerti; such as Rachmaninoff & Mahler. Max Kowalski's Music contains elements of all of the above - a brilliant composer who is truly worthy of being remembered.”

Final Mastering and Artwork by Max Caselnova at Clearcut Studios, Garfield, NJ.



Pierrot Lunaire, Opus 4 of Max Kowalski

1. Gebet an Pierrot (Prayer to Pierrot) Pierrot! Mein Lachen, Hab ich verlernt!
Das Bild des Glanzes Zerfloss - Zerfloss! Schwarz weht die Flagge Mir nun vom Mast.
Pierrot! Mein Lachen Hab ich verlernt! O gieb mir wieder, Rossarzt der Seele,
Schneemann der Lyrik, Durchlaucht vom Monde, Pierrot - mein Lachen!

Pierrot! My laughter I've unlearned. The image of splendor Melted away.
To me the flag waves black Now from the mast. Pierrot! My laughter I've unlearned
O give me back-- Horse-doctor to the soul, Snowman of Lyric, Your Lunar Highness,
Pierrot! my laughter.

2. Raub (Theft)
Rote, fürstliche Rubine, Blutge Tropfen alten Ruhmes,
Schlummern in den Totenschreinen, Drunten in den Grabgewolben.

Princely red rubies, Bloody drops of ancient glory,
Slumber in the coffins, Down there in the sepulchers

Nachts, mit seinen Zechkumpanen, Steigt Pierrot hinab - zu rauben
Rote, fürstliche Rubine, Blutge Tropfen alten Ruhmes.

Nighttimes, with his drinking buddies, Pierrot climbs down-to steal
Princely red rubies, Bloody drops of ancient glory

Doch da - strauben sich die Haare, Bleiche Furcht bannt sie am Platze:
Durch die Finsternis - wie Augen! - Stieren aus den Totenschreinen Rote, fürstliche Rubine.

But look-their hair stands on end, Fear roots them to the spot:
Through the darkness-like eyes!- Out of the coffins stare Princely red rubies.

3. Die Estrade (The Estrada)

Auf den Marmorstufen der Estrade, flüchtig raschelnd, wie mit seidnem Kleide,
tanzt der Staub in bläulich weissem Schimmer, wirbelnd in den Kanten jeder Stiege.

On the marble steps of the Estrada, fleetly rustling, as with silken garments,
dust dances in a blue-white shimmer, spinning on the edge of every step.

Denn die Mondesgöttin wandelt leise, leichten Schrittes die gewohnten Wege
auf den Marmorstufen der Estrade, flüchtig raschelnd, wie mit seidnem Kleide.

For the moon goddess walks softly, with light steps on her usual path,
on the marble steps of the Estrada, fleetly rustling, as with silken garments.

In den Staub vor seine bleiche Fürstin wirft Pierrot sich, im Gebet ersterbend.
Und da liegt der grosse, weisse Körper, aufgerankt und in die Höh gebreitet
auf den Marmorstufen der Estrade.

In the dust before his pale sovereign Pierrot casts himself down, dying in prayer.
And there lies that great white-robed body, stretched out and reaching upward
on the marble steps of the Estrade.

4. Der Dandy (The dandy)

Mit einem phantastischen Lichtstrahl Erleuchtet der Mond die krystallnen Flacons
Auf dem schwarzen, hochheiligen Waschtisch Des schweigenden Dandys von Bergamo.

With a ghostly light ray The moon illumines the crystal flasks
Upon the dark altar-the holy Washbasin Of the taciturn Dandy from Bergamo.

In tönender, bronzener Schale Lacht hell die Fontaine, metallischen Klangs.
Mit einem phantastischen Lichtstrahl Erleuchtet der Mond die krystallnen Flacons

In the resonant bronze basin The fountains laugh a metallic clangor.
With a ghostly light ray The moon illumines the crystal flasks.

Pierrot mit dem wächsernen Antlitz Steht sinnend und denkt: wie er heute sich schminkt?
Fort schiebt er das Rot und das Orients Grün Und bemalt sein Gesicht in erhabenem Stil
Mit einem phantastischen Mondstrahl.

Pierrot with waxen complexion Stands deep in thought: What makeup for today?
He shoves aside the red and oriental green And paints his face in sublime style
With a ghostly light ray.

5. Moquerie (Mockery)

Der Mond gleicht einem blassen Horn am duftig blauen Himmelszelt.
Cassander mit dem Kahlkopf schaut misstrauisch zu ihm auf.
Verstimmt schiebt er im Weitergehn sein letztes Haar mehr in die Stirne.

The moon is like a pale horn on the fragrant blue tent of Heaven.
Cassander with his bald head looks up at him mistrustfully.
Annoyed, as he walks on he strokes his last hair more over his forehead.

Der Mond gleicht einem blassen Horn im duftgen Himmelsblau.
Mit ängstlich scheuem Aug bewacht er Colombine, seine Frau,
die neben ihm an seinem Arm oft nach Pierrot zur Seite schielt.

The moon is like a pale horn in the fragrant blue of Heaven.
With an anxious, timid eye he watches over Colombine, his wife,
who, arm in arm with him, often casts sidelong glance at Pierrot .

Der Mond gleicht einem Horn
The moon is like a horn.

6. Sonnen Ende (A Sun's End)

Die sieche Sonne lässt ihr Blut entströmen auf rotem Wolkenbett,
es träufelt aus den Wunden nieder und färbt das Land.
Es rieselt auf der Eichen bang zitterndes Laub.

The dying sun lets her blood flow out on the red bed of clouds.
It drops down out of the wounds and colors the earth.
It trickles onto the oaks frightened, trembling leaves.

Die sieche Sonne lässt ihr Blut entströmen auf rotem Wolkenbett.
So öffnet sich ein müder Lüstling, von Ekel vor dem Tage übermannt,
die Adern, dass das kranke Leben in Staub verrinnt.

The dying sun lets her blood flow out on the red bed of clouds.
So opens a tired libertine, overpowered by disgust at the day,
his arteries, so that his sick life can flow away into the dust.

Die sieche Sonne lässt ihr Blut entströmen.
The dying sun lets her blood flow out.

7. Nordpolfahrt (Bound for the North Pole)

Einen Eisblock, schillernd weiss, scharf gewetzt vom Licht der Nächte,
trifft Pierrot, als er verzweifelt fühlt, wie schon sein Schiff versinkt.

An iceblock, dazzling white, sharply whetted by the nights light,
encounters Pierrot, as he, despairing, feels his ship already sinking.

Frischbelebten Auges starrt er auf den Retter, ungeahnt
Einen Eisblock, schillernd weiss, scharf gewetzt vom Licht der Nächte

With fresh life in his eyes he stares at the unexpected savior
An iceblock, dazzling white, sharply whetted by the nights light.

Und er scheint ihm ein Kollega, ein Pierrot mit bleichen Ärmeln.
Und mit feierlichen Gesten grüsst er seinen treuen Bruder,
einen Eisblock, schillernd weiss.

And it seems to him to be a colleague, a Pierrot with pale sleeves.
And with solemn gestures he greets his faithful brother,
an iceblock, dazzling white.

8. Columbine

Des Mondlichts bleiche Bluten, Die weißen Wunderrosen,
Blühn in den Julinachten - O brach ich eine nur!

Moonlight's pale blossoms The white wonder-roses,
Bloom in July evenings-- O I'd pluck just one!

Mein banges Leid zu lindern, Such ich am dunklen Strome
Des Mondlichts bleiche Blüten, Die weißen Wunderrosen

To ease anxious suffering, I search on dark streams
Moonlight's pale blossoms, The white wonder-roses.

Gestillt war all mein Sehnen, Dürft ich so märchenheimlich,
So selig leis – entblättern Auf deine brauenen Haare
Des Mondlichts bleiche Blüten!

All my longings would be stilled, If I might, fabled,
stalk Slightly tipsy--strew petals In your brown hair (of)
The moonlight's pale blossoms.

9. Der Mondflecht

Einen weißen Fleck des hellen Mondes Auf dem Rücken seines schwarzen Rockes,
So spaziert Pierrot im lauen Abend, Aufzusuchen Glück und Abenteuer.

One white spot from the bright moon On the back of his black coat,
So Pierrot walks in mild evening Searching for luck and adventure.

Plötzlich stört ihn was an seinem Anzug, Er beschaut sich rings und findet richtig -
Einen weißen Fleck des hellen Mondes Auf dem Rücken seines schwarzen Rockes

Instantly he's troubled by something on his suit, He looks himself over and finds sure enough--
One white spot from the bright moon On the back of his black coat.

Warte! denkt er: das ist so ein Gipsleck! Wischt und wischt, doch -
bringt ihn nicht herunter! Und so geht er, giftgeschwollen, weiter,
Reibt und reibt bis an den frühen Morgen - Einen weißen Fleck des hellen Mondes.

Wait! he thinks: that's a spot of plaster! Wipes and wipes,
but-can't get it out! So on he goes, swollen with fury, farther,
Rubs and rubs until early morning-- One white spot from the bright moon.

10. Die Laterne (The Lantern)

Eine fröhlich leuchtende Laterne,
drin ein windgesichert Flämmchen züngelt,
trägt Pierrot an einem langen Stabe,
dass er ja nicht in den Brunnen purzle!

A cheerfully shining lantern,
its flickering flame protected against the wind,
carries Pierrot on a long pole,
so that he will not tumble into the well!

Und in jedem Winkel hält er stille;
sorgsam stellt er auf das Pflaster nieder
seine fröhlich leuchtende Laterne,
drin ein windgesichert Flämmchen züngelt.

And in every corner he stops silently
carefully he lays down on the pavement
his cheerfully shining lantern,
its flickering flame protected against the wind.

Plötzlich schreit er wie von Wut besessen.
Weh der Welt! Die Leuchte ist erloschen!
Rasend wirft er sich zur Erde nieder
und mit einem Schwefelholze sucht er
seine fröhlich leuchtende Laterne.

Suddenly he cries, possessed by rage
Woe to the earth! My light has gone out!
Furious, he throws himself to the ground
and with a wooden match searches for
his cheerfully shining lantern.

11. Abend (Evening Revery)

Melancholisch ernste Störche, weiss, auf schwarzem Hintergrunde,
klappern mit den langen Schnäbeln monoton des Abends Rhythmen.

Melancholy serious storks, white, on a black background,
clapper with their long beaks monotonously the rhythms of the evening.

Eine hoffnungsleere Sonne trifft mit matten, schrägen Strahlen
melancholisch ernste Störche, weiss, auf schwarzem Hintergrunde

The sun, empty of hope, touches with dull, slanting rays
melancholy serious storks, white, on a black background.

Und der Sumpf, verträumt und müde, mit metallisch grünen Augen,
drin des Tages letzte Lichter scheidend blinken, spiegelt wider
melancholisch ernste Störche.

And the marsh, dreamy and weary, with metallic green eyes,
in which the last lights of the day blink in parting, reflects as in a mirror
melancholy serious storks.

12. Heimfahrt (Barcarole) (Homeward journey)

Der Mondstrahl ist das Ruder, Seerose dient als Boot;
Drauf fährt Pierrot gen Süden Mit gutem Reisewind
Moonbeam is the rudder, Waterlily serves as boat:

Thus Pierrot fares southward On a fair following wind.
Der Strom summt tiefe Skalen Und wiegt den leichten Kahn.
Der Mondstrahl ist das Ruder, Seerose dient als Boot.

The stream hums deep scales And rocks the fragile craft.
Moonbeam is the rudder, Waterlily serves as boat.

Nach Bergamo, zur Heimat, Kehrt nun Pierrot zurück;
Schwach dämmert schon im Osten Der grüne Horizont.
- Der Mondstrahl ist das Ruder.

To Bergamo, to Homeland, Pierrot now wends his way;
Faintly in the east Glows the green horizon.
- Moonbeam is the rudder.


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